Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: Do you love Reverb?

  1. #11
    Moderator jbird604's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    6,460

    Perhaps it's partly just a preference thing, but I certainly enjoy hearing any organ better in a lively room. A dead space, especially where some acoustical "expert" has put fluffy stuff all over the walls in an attempt to make speech more intelligible and controllable via the sound system -- such a space generally ruins the sound of even a good organ, whether it's electronic or pipe, classical or theater.

    While many people, including me, enjoy the unadorned up-close sounds made by pipes, and have no objection to hearing the normal noises made by the mechanism, the air sounds and attacks and so on, listening to music without the benefit of the broadening, blending, sweetening effects of room reflections can be quite tiring.

    As a rule, I find that a room of at least 1000 square feet with a ceiling 16' or higher, with smooth walls and ceiling and normally absorbent objects in the room such as padded furniture and maybe even a tight carpet on the floor will probably have sufficient reflections to make an organ enjoyable without artificial reverb added. If artificial reverb is added, it should not draw attention to itself, just enhance the natural reflections of the room.

    I have heard "too much" natural reverb, specifically when attending a service a few weeks ago in St. Paul's Cathedral in London. The reflections in there are so strong and sustain the organ tone (and human voices too) so long that the sounds run together and make both music and speech way too muddled for me. The congregation were unable to stay with the organ on the hymns because the sound was not clearly rhythmic. At least that was my impression when attending a single service, from where I sat in the nave near the front. Most other English cathedrals where I've attended services also have a lot of reverb, but less than St. Paul's. The optimum amount must be somewhat less than what you hear there, but you sure don't want to lose it all!
    John
    ----------
    Church: Allen MDS-45 with Allen MIDI-DIVISION-II expander
    Home: Allen Renaissance R-230 with expanded four-channel audio and MIDI-DIVISION-II
    Shop: Bunch of organs in varying conditions, some good, some not...
    Half of an incredible two-man organ service team -- servicing all the major digitals in Arkansas churches
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

  2. #12
    fff Fortississimo jdoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Belleville ON CA
    Posts
    6,652

    YesYesYes.....
    1956 M3, 51 Leslie Young Chang spinet, Korg Krome and Kronos

  3. #13
    ppp Pianississmo EclecticOrgan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    19

    Depends on what I am playing, sometimes the more technical I get with my playing I tend to like it a little dryer on the classical pieces. It also depends on what voices I am using on the theatre organs, don't want it to start sounding like sustain. The best advice is "use your ear".

  4. #14
    p Piano Ben Madison's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    246

    Quote Originally Posted by jbird604 View Post
    Perhaps it's partly just a preference thing, but I certainly enjoy hearing any organ better in a lively room. A dead space, especially where some acoustical "expert" has put fluffy stuff all over the walls in an attempt to make speech more intelligible and controllable via the sound system -- such a space generally ruins the sound of even a good organ, whether it's electronic or pipe, classical or theater.

    While many people, including me, enjoy the unadorned up-close sounds made by pipes, and have no objection to hearing the normal noises made by the mechanism, the air sounds and attacks and so on, listening to music without the benefit of the broadening, blending, sweetening effects of room reflections can be quite tiring.

    As a rule, I find that a room of at least 1000 square feet with a ceiling 16' or higher, with smooth walls and ceiling and normally absorbent objects in the room such as padded furniture and maybe even a tight carpet on the floor will probably have sufficient reflections to make an organ enjoyable without artificial reverb added. If artificial reverb is added, it should not draw attention to itself, just enhance the natural reflections of the room.

    I have heard "too much" natural reverb, specifically when attending a service a few weeks ago in St. Paul's Cathedral in London. The reflections in there are so strong and sustain the organ tone (and human voices too) so long that the sounds run together and make both music and speech way too muddled for me. The congregation were unable to stay with the organ on the hymns because the sound was not clearly rhythmic. At least that was my impression when attending a single service, from where I sat in the nave near the front. Most other English cathedrals where I've attended services also have a lot of reverb, but less than St. Paul's. The optimum amount must be somewhat less than what you hear there, but you sure don't want to lose it all!
    Their is a large problem with that at the boardwalk hall and from what i have read is that the organist has to sing the song he or she is playing in their head or else this giant wave of a sound that is bouncing around behind takes them off, because their is some phasing issue. renovations to the hall somewhat mitigated the problem by cutting down on some of the extra reverb.

    But recordings in the hall sound much better then if you were to record everything at the console.

  5. #15
    pp Pianissimo Piperdane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    120

    Artificial reverb, No. Natural reverb, Yes.

    I say this as my former church where I was the organist for 34 years had a II/9 pipe organ in an acoustically dead building that sat about 325 people. It was so dead that it felt like the sound stopped before I took my hands off the keys! As organists, imho, we have to adapt to the natural surroundings of where the instrument is located. I was able to play any kind of organ literature on that instrument - even performed the Mendelssohn Sonata I and the Franck E minor Chorale No 3 in concert there with absolutely zero acoustic reverb enhancement.

    My present church has a natural acoustic of about 2 seconds - perfectly ideal for organ, choir and speech. When the building is full the natural reverb is reduced to about 1/2 second but still acceptable.

    I really loathe some of the newer digital demo recordings that use so much artificial reverb to enhance the sound that it almost sounds fake. The true test of any digital or analog sound is to hear it without any reverb masking the sound.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Any love for the X5 out there?
    By HammondRye in forum Hammond Organs
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-13-2015, 09:38 PM
  2. I Love this organ
    By bartimaeus in forum Classic & Church Electronic Organs
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-05-2012, 03:46 PM
  3. The C2 seems not to get any love.....
    By alexanderarchie10 in forum Hammond Organs
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-21-2011, 09:18 PM
  4. I love this n that on the new forum....
    By Brendon Wright in forum Help & Tips Using the Forum
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-02-2010, 04:25 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •