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    Organ Lessons

    Hi ,
    I am new to thie forum so I hope I am posting in the right place !! Can anyone help me please ? I am looking for someone in the Bedfordshire area who teaches the modern electronic organ. I am about to purchase a Roland Atelier AT 80 ( I think this is the best choice as to what I have seen so far ?) and I am looking for lessons. I have tried google and yell .com but cant find anyone. My nearest organ shop/ dealer is 40 miles away but they do not teach anymore. I have found many keyboard/ piano teachers but I guess the organ is different because of the Bass pedals. Can anyone help me please ?
    Thank you

    Just me

    #2
    Maybe check with the local churches that have organs. Maybe one of the organists likes to teach, or at least needs the money from teaching.
    When I become dictator, those who preach intolerance will not be tolerated.

    Comment


      #3
      I hope you have better luck than me. I have been searching now for six months and have found only one person willing to teach. He was 80 miles away, did NOT have an organ to teach with and wanted to charge $45.00 an hour if I could find an organ to use in his area. Needless to say, I'm trying to teach myself from books and what little is available on the internet. It's tough out there. No wonder churches are dumping their organs. My own church has a really nice pipe organ and one elderly organist who doesn't want to teach. She does a passable job, when she's there and willing to play. This week we were stuck with a piano, a poor excuse for a piano player and the organist sitting in the congregation. No one else seems interested in the organ and, I'll probably be dead before I ever learn enough to play it. Besides, she'll probably have to be dead before anyone else is allowed to touch it.
      "The employment of the piano is forbidden in church, as is also that of noisy frivolous instruments such as drums, cymbals, bells and the like." St. Pius X

      Comment


        #4
        One resoutce is the AGO (American Guild of Organists). The national web site is
        http://www.agohq.org/home.html
        From this you can find a local chapter web site, many list organists willing to teach.

        Another resource is the ATOS (American Theatre Organ Society). They have a list of organists, some of whom will be willing to teach.
        http://www.atos.org/

        Good luck in finding a teacher. My experience is that it is difficult to find a good teacher. I am lucky in that I found an excellent teacher in the Portland, OR area, Donna Parker.
        Allan

        My home organ
        Style D Wurlitzer pipe organ
        http://bluemoonwalkinghorses.com/Sty...tion5_rev3.htm
        Five Newfoundland dogs
        Sixteen Tennessee walking horseshoes

        Comment


          #5
          Does this help?
          http://music-teachers.firsttutors.co...gan-tutors.php

          I dont know your postcode but a search using MK42 2TP revealed this result.

          http://music-teachers.firsttutors.co...ch-results.php


          You may also be able to find an 'on line' teacher.
          http://schoolofeverything.com/teacher/garethgreen

          What syllabus or modern organ tuition system are you intending on using?
          Last edited by Momboc; 12-04-2010, 01:08 PM.
          My MIDI controlled, module and software driven virtual 'organ' thread is here: http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...l=1#post427320

          Comment


            #6
            If you're wanting to learn modern organ style, using the organ in orchestral mode as well as as a pure organ, then look up the London College of Music's page at:http://www.tvu.ac.uk/lcmexams/exam_centres/England.jsp

            Contact the local rep, who may well know of a teacher near you. Sadly, there aren't that many of us left teaching this type of playing, but some of my colleagues on the UK organ scene from a few years back have turned to teaching, just as I did. A local organ club may well still exist near you (there used to be many!) and someone there will surely know of a teacher. If you were nearer to me, I'd love to have a new organ student - they are few in number these days.

            Andy
            It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

            New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

            Current organ: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition
            Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
            Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.

            Comment


              #7
              Hi All , Thank you so much for taking the time to reply ,What a wonderful and interesting forum. I will follow up all your suggestions, wish me luck !
              Just Me

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by andyg View Post
                Contact the local rep, who may well know of a teacher near you. Sadly, there aren't that many of us left teaching this type of playing . . .
                I can't imagine anyone being able to actually teach someone to play that kind of music/instrument! If I were to be placed in a position of having to teach this kind of stuff, I wouldn't have the remotest clue as to where to start, or how to continue.

                I always figured that keyboards, including something like Roland Ateliers, which are merely keyboards with a few pedals attached, were something you had to pretty much figure out on your own, based upon your experience with other keyboard instruments. And when it comes to that, you either have it within you, or you don't.
                2008: Phoenix III/44

                Comment


                  #9
                  You figured rather wrong, my friend! No disrespect, but many (not all!) classical organists know as much about the home organ as many home players do about the classical organ. They are different animals, and their paths sometimes never cross. The theatre organ is nearer to home organ, by a long way!

                  The modern home electronic organ is really the father of the electronic keyboard, so you're actually looking at it the wrong way around. Instruments like the Ateliers are the culmination of nearly 80 years of electronic instruments, and the development is a long story in itself (forms part of a very long thesis for me!) You'd be more accurate to think of the keyboard as being a 1 manual organ with no pedals. It was in the late 1970's that technology had made things small and cheap enough to take what had been a home instrument, a piece of wooden furniture (or perhaps on chrome legs) and make it into a self accompanying, self contained instrument. Thank Hammond/Ace Tone/Roland for the self accompanying part, with the Piper being the first of the breed. Thank the advances in technology for making things small and cheap. Then thank Casio and Yamaha for getting the ball rolling in 1980 and probably sealing the fate of the home organ in so doing! I was with Kawai back then, and actually designed a keyboard in 1979, they even built a prototype. Kawai didn't think they'd take off the way that they did, and I was put back to helping design and voice their organs. Exciting times back then.

                  During the heyday of the home organ, hundreds of thousands were sold all around the world, with the USA and UK being massive markets. Naturally, teaching methods were developed and teachers started to teach! They had to keep up with the advances in technology (or get left behind), of course. With the decline of the home organ market, teachers switched to keyboards as their popularity rose. Older organ teachers retired or died and there were few or none to replace them. There are a few still around over here in the UK and no doubt in the USA. We know our stuff, as all teachers should, but I'm sure that many of the home organ teachers would not have had a clue how to teach classical organ. A small few, like me, are happy to teach all types of organ, classical, theatre, hammond (jazz/blues or 'standards'), or modern orchestral style. However, almost all my teaching these days is piano/keyboard/music tech. I'd love a few more home organ students, but those who need the tuition never seem to be near to me!
                  Last edited by andyg; 12-08-2010, 03:20 AM.
                  It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

                  New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

                  Current organ: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition
                  Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
                  Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by andyg View Post
                    You figured rather wrong, my friend! No disrespect, but many (not all!) classical organists know as much about the home organ as many home players do about the classical organ. They are different animals, and their paths sometimes never cross. The theatre organ is nearer to home organ, by a long way!
                    Andy, I agree with everything you have said in your posting. The thing that really prompted my comment, was the suggestion that the initial check with local church organists for a teacher. The Alteirs and church organs are such different instruments, that the possibility of a church organist being able to teach someone how to play an Alteirs is rather remote.

                    I have a high end Yamaha keyboard PSR-2000. It is so much fun that I bought one for both of my kids. I was surprised what I learned about myself with this instrument; particularly all that big band stuff hiding inside, just waiting for a way to get out; 50's rock and roll is a natural with with these instruments. No one ever taught me how to play it; after 10 minutes with it, I instinctively knew what to do. And although I play this keyboard very well, I wouldn't have a clue how to teach someone else how to play it. And perhaps this is because no one ever taught me how to play a keyboard, whereas I clearly remember how I was taught to play the organ; so to teach organ, I would just teach it the same way I was taught.

                    As for which instrument is better: before my grandchildren could even talk, they would take me by the hand and drag me over to the keyboard, and place my hand on the keys. So I would start to play with my right hand. They instinctively knew this was all wrong, and would go around and take my left hand and place it on the keyboard as well. They have never ever taken me over to play the piano or organ.
                    2008: Phoenix III/44

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I too, agree with Andy's comments.

                      And

                      Originally posted by Clarion View Post
                      something you had to pretty much figure out on your own, based upon your experience with other keyboard instruments. And when it comes to that, you either have it within you, or you don't.
                      also agree with Clarion.
                      Organs: Yamaha D-85, Technics U90 Pro, Wersi Helios W2S, 2x Yamaha HS8's.
                      Keyboards: Roland E-70, Yamaha Tyros 3.
                      Retired: Technics K700.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Do you mean Bedfordshire, UK? If so, why not give the RCO a call? They should give you a list of RCO organists in the area

                        Comment


                          #13
                          As I said earlier, not all classical organists will know how to teach this style of organ (or even want to!). So, RCO may be worth a try but I wouldn't hold out too much hope, unless you can find a RCO qualified organist who isn't afraid to dabble with the 'dark side' (and do it properly).
                          It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

                          New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

                          Current organ: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition
                          Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
                          Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I started with a classical organist teacher. Fingering and reading music worked out well, however I did not learn how to get character in the music. I am studying with a theatre organist now and making much more progress in playing both classical and popular music. She teaches how to make the playing 'musical'.
                            Allan

                            My home organ
                            Style D Wurlitzer pipe organ
                            http://bluemoonwalkinghorses.com/Sty...tion5_rev3.htm
                            Five Newfoundland dogs
                            Sixteen Tennessee walking horseshoes

                            Comment

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