Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A fiingering problem...

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    A fiingering problem...

    I am teaching myself to play my Hammond organ. Apparently, I have "fat" fingers because when I try to play a chord with my left hand (as it is written), D7th in particular, I've got my thumb on D, index finger on C, third finger on A, and fourth finger on F#.

    Well, I can't fit my third finger between G# and Bb, so I have to curl it back while I slide my hand forward. Otherwise, I get the A and the black keys, too. But I watch videos of people playing organ & piano, and they all seem to have their fingers "stretched" out, in a very relaxed position as they play.

    What should I do: sand the edges of my fingers to make them thinner?
    Help!!

    Thanks,
    Arden
    Arden

    Hammond/Suzuki A205 Chapel Organ with 971 Leslie
    Howard studio piano
    Yamaha p_105 Digital piano
    Allen 301B with 2 HC-14 speakers

    #2
    Try using a different inversion. You should know all the inversions of all chords.
    Sanding your fingers would be very painful I imagine.

    Don

    Comment


      #3
      I use my left hand third finger on the A for a D7 and I just curl it so that it doesn't get stuck between the black notes. Seems natural enough to me.
      My MIDI controlled, module and software driven virtual 'organ' thread is here: http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...l=1#post427320

      Comment


        #4
        Try a different inversion. If you have a fifth finger (I know a couple who don't) try using it. Practice, practice, practice, with lots of experimentaion. I have had these problems in the past and as I try out different chords I run into new problems. As I get more dexterous from practice these issues become less frequent and easier to solve.
        When I become dictator, those who preach intolerance will not be tolerated.

        Comment


          #5
          Yes, do practice it, but practicing won't make the fingers shrink. You could easily omit the A! Of the four notes in that chord, the A adds the least musical information. The D is the root, the F# the major 3rd and the C the 7th. The A is the 5th and isn't that vital. I'm sure that, later on in your learning, you'll find that you really don't need three or finger chords all the time. There will be a melody note and a pedal note, so maybe you'll only need one or two notes on the lower.

          For example, a D7 pver an alternating root/5th pedal could be played with just the F# and the C, with the pedals providing the D and A.

          I have an arrangement of My Funny Valentine given to me by one of my mentors, the British theatre organist Jackie Brown. For most of it, it has one note one the upper, one on the lower and one on the pedals. As I was told at the time, "Bach got away with it, so can you!"
          Last edited by andyg; 12-19-2010, 10:31 AM.
          It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

          New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

          Current organ: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition
          Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
          Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by ShadyJoe View Post
            Try a different inversion.
            I DO know the different inversions, but I'm pretty good with reading the treble clef, and am for the first time learning to play bass cleff and then add the pedal parts. When I just played the melody and the chords written above, it was simple. Use what ever inversion was easy from the chord preceeding.

            However, now I am playing the bass line, I'm trying to play it as the notes are written on the staff... So actually I don't understand how a different inverstion would come into play. The music (lesson) I have has chords written on the top of the page, and I'm playing a piece (Second Hand Rose) that I've played before with simple notation, so I'm familiar with the chords and transitions, but I'm trying to ignore the chord notation so I CAN learn to read the bass cleff.

            As to the fiinger position I mentioned, it just happens that the D7 is the one giving me trouble right now. Again, I've watched many U-tube performances, both piano lessons, and organ videos and they seem to play with a very relaxed finger position, with the fingers stretched out for the most part. But I am practicing, practicing, practising as suggested. I do find that if I curve the finger on the A, I am able to play it as written and I belive that continued practice will resolve the issue. I have no expectations of playing even semi-professionaly; I play for my own enjoyment and hopefully am not inflicting too much audio pain on my friends!

            Thanks for all your comments. I have learned SO much since I joined the forum. I will continue to read and post.

            Arden
            Arden

            Hammond/Suzuki A205 Chapel Organ with 971 Leslie
            Howard studio piano
            Yamaha p_105 Digital piano
            Allen 301B with 2 HC-14 speakers

            Comment


              #7
              Glad to hear that you're learning to read bass clef for left hand. Persevere with it, it's one of the best things you can do. I get all my home organ students off chord symbols and onto bass clef as early as I can. Good quality music for home organ is virtually non-existent new. The publishers think that as so few organs are being sold that it isn't viable, simply ignoring the many thousands of owners who already have an organ and play it! Ebay and Craigslist will have some organ music on them and there are some great arrangements out there by the likes of Bill Irwin, Eddie Layton and William McMains. Also look out for a series called Organ Gold, another called The Gentle Touch, and a whole load of books published by Hal Leonard, arranged by the manufacturers' artistes of the day - Rosemary Bailey, Ralph Wolf, Seth Rye etc. All of these move away from fixed chords and into much more interesting left hand work. Well worth aiming for!
              It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

              New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

              Current organ: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition
              Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
              Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.

              Comment


                #8
                Andy, I am curious to hear what you think of the Readers Digest music books??? I also have never had lessons and have given up trying to find a teacher. So, I play for 1-2 hours a day and sometimes wonder if I am getting better or worse (I am 69) in this tug of war between musical proficiency and age. I learned to play entirely from books: scales then major is 1st+3rd+5th then diminshed 1st+b3rd+b5th etc etc. I play chord conversions often depending on the piece and my mood. If there are any distractions while playing (conversations/TV), I play from the chord symbols above the music. When alone, I try to read the left hand. For some reason that I can not explain, I am very comfortable playing the bass pedals and have great difficulty playing without the pedals. I rarely use auto rhythms and never use any of the auto keying/chord functions. I only play for my own and family enjoyment and a rare performance for friends. I taught myself to play while recovering from a bad commercial airplane crash in 1974. The doctor said either learn to play the organ/piano or become a secretary. It was an easy choice for me (I was a Nuclear Engineer). Bought a Lowrey H25R and my first book was one of the 10+/- Readers Digest series. I can always find a piece that will challenge me. I recently had a very accomplished organ/piano player once tell me that since I wasn't playing the music (as written), I really didn't need the score. He reached over and took it from the music rest and I froze. I will admit that if I ever play the same song the same way twice it is by accident. (I bore quickly.) Roy.... on the Technics F100

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by andyg View Post
                  Also look out for a series called Organ Gold, another called The Gentle Touch, and a whole load of books published by Hal Leonard...
                  Andy, thank you for your support. I like your signature: "It's the fact that you're playing that counts." That pretty much sums up my attitude. I have the Hal Leonard web site bookmarked, and I have found thier books at Amazon. I do have some of the Organ Gold books, too. I'm excited to be learning bass clef and pedal. The very next lesson is in waltz tempo, and it has the pedal for the first note, then left hand for the next two. I played just the first two bars and it sounds great - very different from just holding a chord for several measures. My fingering may not be perfect, but as long as I can play the notes I think that's all that matters.

                  As an aside, on Friday I'm having a Baldwin Cinema II organ delivered. With my current Hammond A-205 and Leslie 971, I'll be in organ heaven!!

                  Arden
                  Arden

                  Hammond/Suzuki A205 Chapel Organ with 971 Leslie
                  Howard studio piano
                  Yamaha p_105 Digital piano
                  Allen 301B with 2 HC-14 speakers

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Arden,

                    Try arching your fingers more. You shouldn't be playing with your fingers stretched out. Good luck!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by FrenchHorn8 View Post
                      Arden,

                      Try arching your fingers more. You shouldn't be playing with your fingers stretched out. Good luck!
                      Thank you. I will try that. I try to observe how people play, but there seems to be no "standard". The piano player at my church plays with what I can only call "gusto!". She's very good, don't get me wrong. But she seems to attack the keys. Then I've seen videos of people playing, and it seems they have thier fingers almost stretched out strait. I'm finding my way, slowly. Note reading is becoming easier, especially the higher notes on each staf.

                      On a slightly different note (no pun intended!!), the house where I have my organ is not the one I live in. I have my organs there, and my shop. Since (forced) early retirement is different financially than I anticipated, I'm trying to save money on utilities - like everyone these days, working or not - so I've lowered the thermostat WAY down, to 50 degrees. Well, I don't spend enough time there -- an hour or two practicing - to bother turning on the heat. By the time the house warmed up, I'd be leaving. Well, today I decided that is just TOO DARN CHILLY!! I took my shoe off for pedaling, and my foot got cold and my fingers stiff, even with my coat on. So I'm splurging, and I raised the thermostat to 55. We'll see how it goes. Brrr!!

                      By the way, I hope everyone has a safe and happy holiday, whether you celebrate Christmas, Hanauka (sp?), or what ever. I belong to various forums, and the people on this one are by far the nicest (no "flames"), and most helpful.

                      Thanks!
                      Arden
                      Arden

                      Hammond/Suzuki A205 Chapel Organ with 971 Leslie
                      Howard studio piano
                      Yamaha p_105 Digital piano
                      Allen 301B with 2 HC-14 speakers

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Check out how Joey DeFrancesco curls and twists. The man has some thick fingers.

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwJZBDJF08E

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Viceroy View Post
                          Check out how Joey DeFrancesco curls and twists. The man has some thick fingers.

                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwJZBDJF08E
                          THANK YOU!! This is EXACTLY what I've been looking for. An overhead shot of his hands. I'm going to do a vid-cap, then study it in slow motion.
                          Arden

                          Hammond/Suzuki A205 Chapel Organ with 971 Leslie
                          Howard studio piano
                          Yamaha p_105 Digital piano
                          Allen 301B with 2 HC-14 speakers

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Viceroy View Post
                            Check out how Joey DeFrancesco curls and twists. The man has some thick fingers.

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwJZBDJF08E
                            THANK YOU!! This is EXACTLY what I've been looking for. An overhead shot of his hands. I'm going to do a vid-cap, then study it in slow motion.
                            Arden

                            Hammond/Suzuki A205 Chapel Organ with 971 Leslie
                            Howard studio piano
                            Yamaha p_105 Digital piano
                            Allen 301B with 2 HC-14 speakers

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Viceroy View Post
                              Check out how Joey DeFrancesco curls and twists. The man has some thick fingers.

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwJZBDJF08E
                              THANK YOU!! This is EXACTLY what I've been looking for. An overhead shot of his hands. I'm going to do a vid-cap, then study it in slow motion.
                              Arden

                              Hammond/Suzuki A205 Chapel Organ with 971 Leslie
                              Howard studio piano
                              Yamaha p_105 Digital piano
                              Allen 301B with 2 HC-14 speakers

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X