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    New shoe's for da organ player

    Hey all,

    Well I just performed a test with very first time use of Organmaster shoe's. I can say this, it will take time for me to re-adjust to playing pedals because for 34 years I've been in stockings with no accuracy or very little of it. These shoe's are a bit narrow and very tight and I will assume in time they will relax and expand to provide more comfortable fit. Nice thing however is I am with these shoe's able to hit the pedal I want on these very narrow AGO pedalboards without hitting adjacent pedals.

    Two major issues now loom due to 1-1/2" heal, first is the new foot position (farther forward) and due to my tall height, my knee's are firmly into the keydesk. I am over six foot tall with long legs and adding these shoe's means no space under the organ keydesk. I tried pulling the bench much further back to allow leg movement but now I'm too far away from the organ and expression pedals.

    Second issue which I thought these shoe's would address is heal to pedal. They are supposed to mitigate slip and fall-off but that is not the case at all. Because of my height, I have to curl my foot to play some pedals with my heal and this angle causes incorrect positioning which I play with side of heal and it slips off the pedal.

    The result from my initial test is yes I can more accurately play the pedal note I'm after although I now find myself searching for the pedal because I can't feel the pedals. Also I noticed the right foot slipping downward on the expression pedals and falling off. I will continue to keep the shoe's on and learn to use them but alterations must be performed to the organ console to adapt to their use.

    Non-skid materials will have to be added to expression pedals to prevent foot fall-off, and somehow I need to cut the organ in half to add 3"-5" to get the keydesk away from my knee's. I haven't looked at AGO's specification book yet to see what the height between top of pedalboard to bottom keyboard is supposed to be but I can't see that adding a few inches to raise the keydesk will make all that much difference in playability.

    If my organ used a plug in pedalboard I could just raise the entire organ and that would increase distance between pedalboard and keydesk but my organ uses magnetic reed contacts and I can't honestly think of a way to move the magnetic reed contact board downward so this creates a dilemma.

    At any rate I have a design issue that I will have to carefully think out to find the best solution to add height between pedalboard and keydesk. What is the most extreme alteration anyone has made to a console to address this issue?

    Note for reference, these shoe's didn't create this problem as my knee's were already into the keydesk before but not as bad as they are now. The console and bench must be raised to higher position but pedalboard must stay down flat on the floor which it isn't now because it sits raised in keepers to keep alignment with magnetic reed contact board. I am not against doing away with magnetic reed contacts and adding the contacts directly to the pedalboard and placing a hardwired harness with disconnect in it's place but first I have to find out if such parts exist or do I need to create them.

    Why it would be good to add contacts directly to pedalboard is during that design change, I could add second touch to the pedalboard which I don't currently have. I still have twenty-nine terminals available on the pedal input board which would give me 28-pedals and one contact buss bar for 2nd-touch. Somebody talk to me, give me some idea's as to best approach. The reason I even considered cutting the console in half is because I saw a few large Wurlitzer consoles which are actually two pieces. A top half from keydesk and up, and a second section which is just under keydesk to floor with a hinges in the rear.
    James Barrow
    Crawfordsville, Indiana. U.S.
    Hobby Organist/Hobby Organ Builder
    1968 Rodgers 33E Theatre Organ
    Hardware from: Artisan Instruments
    Sound Engine Software: jOrgan
    Dispositions: Wurlitzer 260 and JL-Hammond B3-Trio
    Member of: CIC-ATOS

    #2
    Thank you for posting your experiences of organ shoes versus socks for playing the pedal keys.

    I am 5"11" inches but have wide (9 1/2 D) feet. I am a volunteer organist who plays in public only on Sundays. Organ is my avocation. My organ instructor (back in the 50's) insisted that I learn to play with shoes. He said it was more professional! He also insisted that I learn to play in any pair of shoes I am wearing. He felt that I should be available to play at a moment's and not have to demure because I did not have my organ shoes with me.

    I think, because of your height, you might have less frustration as you learn to play with shoes if you used shoes with standard height heels. The problem these days with the chic sloppy dress standards, imposed on us lesser mortals by the pop star fasion gurus, is finding decent shoes. Search for shoes with thin leather soles; soles which are glued on without the trendy single or double stiched edges. Avoid the trendy new part-leather-part-ruber sole. Avoid rubber heels; either leather or half-leather/half-rubber heels work. And stay away from the "elf" shoes which add three inches to the end of your foot!!! You will have to look at imported shoes from Italy and other fashion-conscious countries. Some of the discount shoes stores carry acceptable versions made in South America.

    Experiments you can try which will convince you that learning to play in shoes is worth the effort - -

    Unable to determine the position of your foot: You can easily detect where you are on the pedal keyboard as follows. Detect the interval B flat to D flat, or E flat to G flat, by positioning your foot between the black notes and gently swinging you foot left to right. From there you should be able, with practice, to play any note without looking at your foot.

    Normal pedal position of foot: Playing notes, when called for, with the tips of my toes is a snap. (Try that with your stockened foot.) But most of the time I have to play with the outer or inner edge of the sole, depending on the position of the note on the pedal keyboard and the foot in use.

    Heel to toe pivoting: Depending on where I am on the pedal keyboard, with standard height heels, I may play on the edge of my heel to avoid playing two notes. But the beauty of heels is a follows

    1) Try a pivot, white key (heel) - black key (toe) - white key (heel) with and without shoes. Note that with shoes your toes do not wrap around the black key! (This can be a real frustration if your feet are bare or in socks.)

    2) Try a pivot, white key (heel) to the second black key over (toe). In stockings it is impossible. (This is an example where you may need to pedal with the edge of your heel.)

    Your problem with the foot barely reaching the swell or crescendo pedal. That is a design problem of the particular organ. On the Rodgers at church I have no difficulty. On my midified pipe organ console at home I have the same problem. In the latter case I have to use the tip of foot. Fortunately, the swell pedal has a finely corrugated horizontal rubber tread and the tip of my shoe does not slip off. But I am definitely off-balance when I am trying to control the swell pedal, particularly if I am playing notes with the other foot at the same time.
    Last edited by castaway; 12-21-2010, 10:47 AM.

    Comment


      #3
      I believe that the standard AGO measurement from the top of the pedal surface to the bottom of the lowest manual key surface is about 29 or 30".

      Comment


        #4
        Thank you Austin766. I just measured my console from "E-natural" on the pedalboard to the bottom of the Accompaniment Manual (part that sticks out) and this is 28". From that same "E" note on the pedalboard to the bottom of the thumb piston rail is 26". Bottom of keydesk to pedals is 24-1/2". From the top of my knee to bottom of heal on organ shoe's is 24-1/2". I don't believe my console is regulation height. Wonder how that came to be. I have the exact same AGO 32-pedal radius/concave pedalboard as all the other large consoles.

        I have had the opportunity tonight to wear the Organmaster shoe's for another couple hours and walk around the house with them on and you wanna know something, they are so comfortable that I easily forgot that I had them on. Getting them on my feet is a task, and taking them off is just as difficult but while they are on, they are quite comfy. After I took them off, I put them up next to my bare feet and wonder in amazement how I even get my feet in them because my foot is about another inch wider than the shoe but they don't feel cramped.

        I played for about an hour with them on and geez by golly I think I'm getting better although a couple times I had to look to see where my foot went because sound was off by one note. That's not bad for an untrained organ player. I watched a professional artist just recently loose his feet during a performance and had to look for them so I don't feel bad at all. It did however put a great big smile on my face when I realized what he did and that was my ah-ha moment. Even the pro's have trouble too and that feel's so good to know. Playing with organ shoe's on is a plus because as Castaway pointed out, toes on bare feet tend to go around the note you intend to hit.

        I hope within the next year I will be able to locate a "male" theatre organ instructor who knows how to work with self taught students to help break bad habits and teach new ways to improve playing which I admit I need help. I am putting the word out there but so far no takers. I hope if things go right to be stage ready by the time I turn 50 so I have 5 years to learn to play like the pro's do so when my friends invite me to sit down to the console I will do so without hesitation. I get the invites now but as I tell my friends, I don't want to sit down to the console (especially in front of people) because I don't feel qualified to sit upon such a throne. Right now I have not earned that privilege therefore I can't be king. I'm not missing anything though because I have my own 3 manual large console here at home but it's not a real pipe organ.
        James Barrow
        Crawfordsville, Indiana. U.S.
        Hobby Organist/Hobby Organ Builder
        1968 Rodgers 33E Theatre Organ
        Hardware from: Artisan Instruments
        Sound Engine Software: jOrgan
        Dispositions: Wurlitzer 260 and JL-Hammond B3-Trio
        Member of: CIC-ATOS

        Comment


          #5
          My feet ate EEE width and learning the petals has certainly been interesting. Organmasters sizes only go to EE but, I've been thinking about sending them a foot tracing to see if they can fit me anyway. One thing that has made learning easier for me, but I'm questioning if it's right or not, is that my organ only sounds the lowest note played at any one time. It's not like a key board where key combinations all play together. Only one petal plays at one time and it's always the lowest note selected. This has actually allowed me to cheat a bit which isn't the greatest idea when learning. Organ is a Wurlitzer model 800 with the 25 note petal board. What say the experts?
          "The employment of the piano is forbidden in church, as is also that of noisy frivolous instruments such as drums, cymbals, bells and the like." St. Pius X

          Comment


            #6
            AGO specifications:

            http://organ.wicks.com/pdf/agoconsole.pdf

            Note on the schematic that the measurement from the Great manual (middle) to the Pedals is 29 1/2 inches. The Choir manual is situated below that. If measured from the lowest manual, the distance would be approximately 2 1/2 less.
            Last edited by castaway; 12-22-2010, 08:58 AM.

            Comment


              #7
              There is a custom moccasin shop in Friendship Indiana that can make round bottom moccasins from a trace or a verbal description. I had some moccasins made to width C in front and width B in back, because my foot has spread a bit as I gained weight but the heel didn't change. EEE should be no problem. The round bottom is handy for hitting the middle of the pedal. This is their website http://www.carldyers.com/ and the address/phone is
              Dyer's Original Moccasin'sDyer's Original Moccasin's
              5961 E State Road 62
              Versailles, IN 47042
              (812) 667-4852
              The leather is a little thicker than the kid moccasins you made at camp, but not suitable for street use.
              Well, Friendship is really hard to get to in the winter, and a bad drive anytime, maybe they moved to the nearest town on US 50. It is the site of the National Black Powder shootoff in the fall, and the tents are a great place for guys to find old tools.
              Last edited by indianajo; 12-22-2010, 09:50 AM.
              city Hammond H-182 organ (2 ea),A100,10-82 TC, Wurlitzer 4500, Schober Recital Organ, Steinway 40" console , Sohmer 39" pianos, Ensoniq EPS, ; country Hammond H112

              Comment


                #8
                Castaway, thanks for the AGO cheat sheet.

                Snowbandit, On my console, you can play as many bass pedals together as your feet can reach. The organmasters due to heal height can easily play 3rd's. Sometimes I forget to cancel the pedalboard and I'll stand up on the pedals for re-adjustment and mash down about a half dozen notes which nearly brings the roof down. On my little Wurlitzer spinets with broomstick pedals, they cancel each other out like yours does. When I rip those two instruments apart and rebuild those digitally, they too will be able to play as many bass pedals as a single foot can reach.
                James Barrow
                Crawfordsville, Indiana. U.S.
                Hobby Organist/Hobby Organ Builder
                1968 Rodgers 33E Theatre Organ
                Hardware from: Artisan Instruments
                Sound Engine Software: jOrgan
                Dispositions: Wurlitzer 260 and JL-Hammond B3-Trio
                Member of: CIC-ATOS

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by castaway View Post
                  AGO specifications:

                  http://organ.wicks.com/pdf/agoconsole.pdf

                  Note on the schematic that the measurement from the Great manual (middle) to the Pedals is 29 1/2 inches. The Choir manual is situated below that. If measured from the lowest manual, the distance would be approximately 2 1/2 less.
                  There is a known error in the diagram in that document, but the text is correct. The text reads, "29-1/2 in. between playing surface of the natural keys of lowest manual and middle natural key of of pedal." On a two-manual organ, the lowest keyboard is the Great, however, in a three-manual organ the Great is in the middle. Just use the lowest manual to measure, regardless of how many there are. The drawing (which is incorrect) shows 29.5" to the middle manual--wrong.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Yes I caught that, appreciate the highlight. On my organ from the keytop of the lower (Accompaniment) manual to top of natural key of pedal is 28-1/4". From bottom edge of the thumb piston rail to natural key of pedal is 26.0" That is the exact height from my knee down to soles of Organmaster shoe. The bottom of keydesk on each front side of console to pedal is 24-1/2". As you can see it's a little crowded in front of my knee panel. The way this diagram is set, for a short 5' organist, this height would be perfect but for tall players we need the extra height.

                    Can't tell you how many times I go for the far three notes on the left side of pedalboard (C,D,E) and my knee slams into the keydesk. In case you've not done it, it hurts. If you see tears coming from my eyes, it's not because I'm playing a really sad song, it's because I just bopped my kneecap to the bottom side of the keydesk.

                    BTW - I fixed the error on the "Measurement for Console" page and moved the line from Great manual to lower Accompaniment manual so now it illustrates correctly. Also I re-sized the first page so that all the information prints out correctly. If you need a replacement copies of changes I've made let me know and I'll scan them PDF and put them back on here.
                    Last edited by JAB8283; 12-22-2010, 05:07 PM. Reason: Made repair to AGO Measurement for Console page, and resized first page so all words print out correctly.
                    James Barrow
                    Crawfordsville, Indiana. U.S.
                    Hobby Organist/Hobby Organ Builder
                    1968 Rodgers 33E Theatre Organ
                    Hardware from: Artisan Instruments
                    Sound Engine Software: jOrgan
                    Dispositions: Wurlitzer 260 and JL-Hammond B3-Trio
                    Member of: CIC-ATOS

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Jim,

                      Not being blessed by as much height as you, I will try to refrain from advice except to ask if you have tried placing the bench on blocks. Why? Your toes aren't the problem, it's the heels, right? So lifting the bench might allow your knees to slope down enough to clear the bench...Ah, never mind, probably a bad idea now that I think of it.

                      Better thought: I am quite surprised the Rodgers 33E is not AGO, makes me want to check my 32B measurements. But assuming it is NOT AGO and you want to make it so (or you want to move it to the upper extreme of AGO), if you are willing to do the work, there is no reason you could not remodel the reed switch plate and pedals downward and lift the console proper up on a low block. I know this would be possible on my Rodgers 32B because (don't ask) I had to disassemble the entire organ, and moved the case separately from the innards. The reed switches are all mounted to a thin piece of wood (or particle board) which is connected to the console by screws and of course the wires going to the tone generators. There isn't a lot of slack, but I think there would be plenty to remount that board downward up to 3 or 4 inches. Of course, this would require significant cabinet work to create a mounting place for these switches, as well as to lift up the console, but when there is a will there is a way. Of course, you would still have issues if you ever guest on someone else's organ, but bench blocks might help.

                      Speaking of which - don't be shy. People are amazingly forgiving when you play. If you wait until you are Cameron Carpenter to play at someone's home, you probably won't want to. Have people over to your place and play for them. They will be honored to get in 'on the ground floor' of a learning experience. Plus, you can always blame your inexperience for any errors. Later on, they expect more so it's harder.
                      ________
                      = D e l l =
                      (no relation to company of same name)

                      Allen ADC-4900D
                      Rodgers 32B - all original
                      Rodgers 32C - now MIDI only

                      My Blog http://organquest.blogspot.com/

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I think, because of your height, you might have less frustration as you learn to play with shoes if you used shoes with standard height heels. The problem these days with the chic sloppy dress standards, imposed on us lesser mortals by the pop star fasion gurus, is finding decent shoes. Search for shoes with thin leather soles
                        I am completely agree with the above statement which was written by Mr. castaway. I think using a decent pair of shoes which suits the comfort level as well as our height is better option. No matter if you are playing a piano or guitar.
                        "Going High"

                        Comment


                          #13
                          On the organ bench, I've already run the screws out to 1-1/4". If anything this is a learning experience for me because the Rodgers Consoles feature a 32 AGO pedalboard so I ASSUMED the rest of the console was AGO spec as well. It's not but I will make some design changes to the console to increase distances to AGO spec's.

                          I have had several opportunities during open console to play the Wurlitzer, Page and Barton theatre pipe organs and I want to play all of them but outside of my new experiences on my VTPO, I have never been trained on pipe organs, I still need to learn registration and what color tones work with what. I have put word out in my chapter that I need an instructor to guide me and help teach me what I need to know about pipe organs.

                          It isn't that I can't play a pipe organ because a keyboard is a keyboard and they are all alike, but setting registration and choosing color tone is my problem. Also I want an instructor to check that I am not developing any bad habits and correcting one's I may already have developed in 34 years. Remember, until last year all my organ experience has been on spinets with 44-note keyboards, 13-broomstick bass pedals. When I bought and had flown my console to me, this is my only experience on a large console with full pedalboard. When I gutted the instrument and replaced analog sounds with digital pipe sampling, this is my first time playing an organ that sounds like a pipe organ. Still I have no experience setting registration because the way I do it now, I build one stoptab at a time until I find the sound I'm looking for which can take 20-minutes sometimes.

                          When I build registration, I try to find tones that work well together and avoid those stops which create conflict or sound off color. Just yesterday I watched a youtube video with master organist David from the Castro, and I learned more in two minutes with him than I've learned in 34-years from anyone else. I would love to have him as my instructor but he's in S.F. and I'm in Indy.

                          Another skill that makes a theatre organist is the ability to Improvise and Embellish. Early on in my musical life I had those gifts but through traumatic brain injury I lost those abilities. Right now I want to learn to play the theatre pipe organ correctly, and learn how to use the pallet of color tones to shape and texture my music.
                          James Barrow
                          Crawfordsville, Indiana. U.S.
                          Hobby Organist/Hobby Organ Builder
                          1968 Rodgers 33E Theatre Organ
                          Hardware from: Artisan Instruments
                          Sound Engine Software: jOrgan
                          Dispositions: Wurlitzer 260 and JL-Hammond B3-Trio
                          Member of: CIC-ATOS

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Regarding the poster who commented regarding organmasters:
                            "chic sloppy dress standards, imposed on us lesser mortals by the pop star fasion gurus"

                            My understanding is that organmaster heel height is not for fashion but for increased ability to straddle notes (playing thirds with one foot). Depends on the style of playing you do. If you play primarily left footed theater organ probably not necessary to be able to do this. If you do modern stuff you might have to use.

                            Regarding Jim's comment:
                            "the way I do it now, I build one stoptab at a time until I find the sound I'm looking for which can take 20-minutes sometimes."

                            There are books on organ registration (check out Amazon), but in the end, it is you ears that do not lie. Creative registration is a gift and a skill but primarily depends on listening to the sound you make. If you like it, then that is what matters. There are shortcuts and rules of thumb (principle chorus usually works for congregational singing, vox humana probably wouldn't be your first choice to lead a stirring march, etc) but don't shortchange your ability to hear and create new textures. At a recent concert by an internationally known organist, he spent what seemed like nearly 5 minutes (might have been slightly less) just thinking about the stops and setting up combination actions for his final improvisation (for which he obviously could not have prepared like he did for all the other pieces). I can only imagine how much time went into the whole concert prep. And remember, each organ is different, so a given stop name won't necessarily sound quite the same (or even close sometimes) on two different organs. Trust your ears.

                            By the way, would you mind sharing the YouTube Links for "David of Castro" - that sounds wonderful.. If he is the regular organist at the Castro I must have heard him play many times, and I always enjoy his music even though it is not my style really (he plays a lot of left foot theater organ pieces)
                            ________
                            = D e l l =
                            (no relation to company of same name)

                            Allen ADC-4900D
                            Rodgers 32B - all original
                            Rodgers 32C - now MIDI only

                            My Blog http://organquest.blogspot.com/

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Dell,

                              I can say this about my new Organmaster shoes, I like them alot. It's now been three days that I've had them and already I am noticing the accuracy improving. I deliberately got them narrower than I normally wear shoes however once I've had them on a few minutes, I forget I have them on. In just three days I've noticed that I am able to attack the note I intended and with the narrower profile, I'm hitting one note rather than two. One more thing worth mentioning, because the 1-1/2" rise in heal height which caused my foot to rotate forward, I actually found it easier to play heal-toe, heal-toe so when I come down from a black note to a white note, I can just move my heal downward and the note sounds then of course I slide the rest of the foot down while playing that note and it works beautifully. It's much easier to play heal-toe with the shoe's on rather than in stocking feet and it feel's more natural as well. On the part about feeling for the pedals, since you obviously can't feel the pedals through the shoe's, I noticed that rather than searching the for pedal I want, my foot is automatically going to the note. This was quite a surprise and I didn't expect that so maybe from here on out, I can just concentrate on what my hands are doing and reading than looking for my feet.

                              Here is the situation I am having with registration and probably the books may assist in this area, but I need to physically sit down to a pipe console and flip each stop one at a time to hear the tone color each stop makes in relationship to the name on the stop tab. Once I have done this then maybe I can use books to learn to layer the various sound colors to create the texture I'm looking for on a particular song. Of late I'm practicing three different marches, and since marches are normally heavy in brass and string I know to automatically load up on those stops for brightness and for fullness, I can layer on flue sounds. Where I am lacking is on songs with soft textures in which only a couple of stops would achieve the desired effect. This I can learn to do better if I have a seasoned organist to sit with me and show me tricks of the trade where less is more.

                              The Master Organist at the Castro Theatre with whom I speak is David Hegarty. This is the link to that YouTube video: "http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lWg43kys_8M". In this video he explains a little about the theatre organ and what sounds the stoptabs make. It is his speaking style and ability to explain in simple terms that I like. If he had a video series for the whole theatre organ from setup to playing I am sure I could improve hundred fold in my abilities. For me I learn best by "follow the leader". If I am shown how to do something, then turn around and mimic what I saw or heard then I learn it as well. I wish I lived in the San Fransisco area because I would ask David to be my guide and instructor because I understand him, he doesn't talk over my head as many people unintentionally do.

                              While my preference in organ style is the "left foot theatre organ", I do enjoy the more technically advanced players who can play "two-footed classical organ". I will never learn that style although I would like some limited instruction in playing with two feet. I love to hear and play theatre organ, but I enjoy listening to classical. As for liturgical organist, I applaud their abilities and their desire to learn that style but it's not for me. I limit myself to theatre and classical.

                              I entered the theatre organ arena a little late in life (because I didn't know they still existed), but now I've learned the truth I am serious about learning the craft if I can find the right instructor who can work with me. We had from what I understand a very very well known and knowledgeable instructor however I just learned last weekend he no longer lives in Indiana and has moved to Florida for retirement. So the search is on for a male organist with his knowledge to share with me and help teach me the ropes. I can learn this however my methods of learning are unorthodox as I was never book strong, but if someone shows me and I can turn around and emulate what I saw then I can learn it too. I am not against playing in front of people, but if I am to sit at a real pipe organ then I want the ability to sit upon that throne with authority, set my registration with confidence and play proficiently whether I foul or not is another story but if all the other building blocks are in place, then that mitigates any chances of a misfire.

                              At our monthly meetings, I am surrounded by many highly trained theatre organist and that is good however I know enough to back down and not make a fool of myself. Yes I know all these professionals got their start somewhere but I want the confidence that when I do take my place at the theatre organ, that I will be able to do so with insight so when I play people will sit down and listen rather than hearing me as they are attempting to exit the building as fast as possible as many do after the concert. My time will come, in the meantime I am not ready.

                              Incidentally, I already found the very first instrument which I will be playing. It is a Wurlitzer 3/26 which is installed in one of our high schools. I have already made a personal connection to that one instrument and it is the one I want to play first when the time arrives. The sound is balanced and more full versus some of the other installations I've heard. In a couple of months I will get to hear for the first time a Grand Page 4/16 installed in one of our theater's. This will be my first visit to that theatre and I am told that instrument will knock my socks off so I'll reserve judgment until that day. Our other Grand Page and Grand Barton I was not to smitten with. Their sounds were weak and lacking fullness. My Rodgers VTPO here at home is very full bodied, and bright. The textures are not very clear with the sample set I am using but the sample set I intend to use will clear that problem right up plus changing out my analog speaker cabinets for digital one's will add to that experience. In case you're wondering what do I consider the perfect balance in texture and sound, listen to other video's on YouTube of the Wurlitzer theatre pipe organ from the Castro Theatre. The sound is very clean, the textures are very rich and comfortable, and just enough fullness to wrap around you. I have listened/watched several recordings with Harry Garland at the console at the Castro Theatre and I am a firm believer that, that installation is number one in my book. I can only imagine the feeling I'd have if I were to ever get to sit in that theatre during a show.
                              Last edited by JAB8283; 12-23-2010, 10:26 AM.
                              James Barrow
                              Crawfordsville, Indiana. U.S.
                              Hobby Organist/Hobby Organ Builder
                              1968 Rodgers 33E Theatre Organ
                              Hardware from: Artisan Instruments
                              Sound Engine Software: jOrgan
                              Dispositions: Wurlitzer 260 and JL-Hammond B3-Trio
                              Member of: CIC-ATOS

                              Comment

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