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    #16
    Teaching is a two-way experience! Or at least it should be. I think I pick up on what my students are thinking and feeling, but it's great to have a conversation with them about their successes, failures, challenges and aspirations. Too often, a student (age is immaterial) will just not say much. That makes it hard for some teachers.

    I hope you do indeed have a good teacher, but you should not feel overwhelmed, nor intimidated by them. I learnt the hard way a long time ago (losing a student or two in the process) that it never pays to showboat during a lesson - or after it. By all means set an example, but don't show off and put them off.

    Stick with it and we're always on hand to give you as much support and advice as you ever need!
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current organ: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.

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      #17
      Originally posted by Wannabee View Post
      I know I'm gonna get raked over the coals for this, but what is the secret to learning to read music? (pay attention prolly is one)
      Especially when you don't like it, but love music and in particular the piano and organ.

      I guess if there are any dumb questions, this is a whopper
      Thanks and cheers to all.
      The fastest way to learn to read music is to practice doing it with your instrument. It does take time, but it eventually becomes an automatic thing . . . . In the eye and out the fingers, in other words you get to the point where you don't think of the names of the notes or which finger is playing it, you just do it.

      There are no dumb questions except for the ones that are never asked. There are however plenty of dumb answers.
      Good luck,
      Dr Bill

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        #18
        Welcome Dr Bill,
        Read your comment with interest. If I am learning a new piece, I do sometimes 'practice' without the instrument. Often taking music to 'read' on the train. Depending on the type of music will depend on my approach to it. Anything other than classical pieces I generally look through the piece and check out the chords, looking at perhaps alternative ways to play them, different inversions for example to make hand movements easier. I may also think of what registrations to use and where to change them. Always having a pencil to mark the copy as necessary.
        When back at the console or piano I have a complete run through, mistakes and all, but I find having 'read' the music first a big help.
        Hope this isn't a dumb answer!
        Mac

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          #19
          Perhaps the best "alternative" means of reading music is when my Piano Pedagogy teacher in college turned the music sideways and asked me to play what I saw. It gave me a new perspective into people who are "right brained" but are forced to learn "left brained." Even my wife thinks this method is molly-coddling wimps. However, I use it with my students every quarter, and many are quite surprised they can actually do it that way!

          I'm in the camp, whatever helps the person learn, the better. That said, however, I do turn the music back the customary way once the student has overcome his/her initial fears, barriers, etc.

          If you'd like, I can make a photo of what I'm talking about and share it. Let me know.

          Michael
          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
          • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 4 Pianos

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by mac View Post
            Welcome Dr Bill,
            Read your comment with interest. If I am learning a new piece, I do sometimes 'practice' without the instrument. Often taking music to 'read' on the train. Depending on the type of music will depend on my approach to it. Anything other than classical pieces I generally look through the piece and check out the chords, looking at perhaps alternative ways to play them, different inversions for example to make hand movements easier. I may also think of what registrations to use and where to change them. Always having a pencil to mark the copy as necessary.
            When back at the console or piano I have a complete run through, mistakes and all, but I find having 'read' the music first a big help.
            Hope this isn't a dumb answer!
            Mac
            You obviously have some experience reading music, whereas Wannabee seems to be a complete or almost complete beginner. Your approach is sound, and would also help Wannabee learn to read music. However I think we all want to get beyond the "phonics approach" sounding out each syllable of every chord or word. As experienced musicians we should be able to recognize the chord or word as a whole and automatically playing it without a great deal of intervening thought.
            Dr Bill

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              #21
              Originally posted by myorgan View Post
              Perhaps the best "alternative" means of reading music is when my Piano Pedagogy teacher in college turned the music sideways and asked me to play what I saw.
              Interesting. Ever heard of "Klavarskribo?" Check this out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klavarskribo

              Developed in Holland it is basically keyboard tabulature (similar to guitar tabulature). Supposedly a more intuitive way of reading music for keyboard instruments. I've not learned it myself, but know a few church organists (trained in Holland) that use it. The website (listed at the bottom of the wikipedia article) has a free tutorial available for download.
              -Gary

              If it's not baroque, don't fix it.
              YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/thevande...?feature=guide
              Web Site (with sheet music): http://www.garyvanderploeg.com

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by thevanderploegs View Post
                Interesting. Ever heard of "Klavarskribo?" Check this out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klavarskribo

                Developed in Holland it is basically keyboard tabulature (similar to guitar tabulature).
                Puts me in mind of the "picture music" system developed for the Hammond Chord Organ:

                http://users.rcn.com/clonk/ChordOrgan/chordomus.html
                -------

                Hammond M-102 #21000.
                Leslie 147 #F7453 in the queue.
                Hammond S-6 #72421

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                  #23
                  That's an excellent tip- using pencil you can not only stimulate the memory to recall what was jotted down, but upon erasing you test and hone your ability to seal into your memory what you believe you will remember. These hands on paper can be very effective in training the memory. As a kid I was extremely coordinated. I could ride a unicycle and juggle etc. Playing guitar as a teen involved dexterity and a good bit of coordination for sight reading ( which never clicked). For some reason as an adult, and having the footwork thrown in on an organ at first it seemed impossible, but as the lessons continue it's bringing back some of that full body coordination that came from playing sports etc. Except one of the tricks I've found in practicing is to never take more than 1 day off in a row, but it is good to walk away completely from site reading for one day a week and play everything you've learned from memory. Ear training exercises are important separate from the reading lessons. I'm sure there are plenty of ear training links online. I am not one who ever wanted to play jazz, but to learn the elements of theory can help anyone be a better improvisor and arranger. In fact I just hit the head of the nail- even if you hate jazz, theory is needed for arranging music. If you want a basic piece of music to have more embellishments, be snappier sounding, or say you want to make a song up? Learn the progression of the tune, the basic chord changes. Then with this you can practice at changing the entire piece into a different tonal texture simply by taking the basic chords of the song and making them Major/Minor/Augmented etc. While doing this you will realize that the melody that plays over top can now have some extra notes that were different than the original melody thrown in, or even replace those original notes all together. Different rhythms can change the mood of a tune as well. Even if you hate jazz ( and I say this because ALL music benefits from understanding the principles of music) you need music theory. Even if you can play by ear and are happy with that, learning to read music will increase your ability to use your ear. By all means learn how to cheat a little too. In theater organ playing you don't have to play an entire chord with all five fingers, once you learn theory you can play as little as two or three notes of the chord because you understand the musical thread that holds the tune together. At this stage of my organ playing I am telling this stuff to myself as much as you because it's easy to slip and rest on the music you already know. I have a habit of learning tunes at my skill level and then get lazy about the next lesson. It's okay to go at your own pace and even take breaks, but if you slip just flip on youtube and watch some videos of organ music. I made up a very good playlist called 'Organ Music even Organ Haters will love!' It's a youtube playlist, but because youtube took away the random feature, whenever you play the list it's always in the same order so put the following info in the link to randomtube ( which follows this info). This page stays here and random tube opens in another window. Lots of very good organ music posts from all over the world.

                  1. user name= paulj0557
                  2. playlist= Organ Tunes even Organ Haters will love!

                  Use the above info at the following site:

                  http://youtube-playlist-randomizer.valami.info/
                  Wurlitzer '46' Model 31 Orgatron & 310 rotary cab, 56' 4410 , 65' 4300
                  Hammond '55' S6 Chord Organ,HR-40,ER-20, 1971 X66/& 12-77 tone cabinet w/ 122 kit & TREK Transposer- of which I've retrofitted a Wurlitzer/Lowrey 'PedAL gLIdE' awesome!
                  Gulbransen 61' 1132 '76' Rialto II & Leslie 705 + two 540
                  Conn '57' 406 Caprice '59' 815 Classic (the 29th 815)
                  PLEASE SAVE THE WURLITZER ELECTROSTATIC CONTINUOUS-FREE-REED ORGANS 1953'-1961' Hammond TW's ONLY TRUE COMPETITOR! (Ggl> NSHOS WURLI 4600)

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