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Who owns the Conn Organ trademark?

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    Who owns the Conn Organ trademark?

    So, when Kimball killed off its organ division, what happened to the Conn organ trademark? Would it be possible to revive the Conn brand (separate from Selmer-Conn)?
    Conn 427M Deluxe Caprice (1959) | Kimball 792 Swinger (1975, gutted for MIDI)

    #2
    Hard to know whether C G Conn licensed the brand name to Kimball or sold it. I doubt if anyone would be able to revive the brand name without Conn's say-so (and plenty of $$$) !
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current organ: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.

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      #3
      Originally posted by andyg View Post
      Hard to know whether C G Conn licensed the brand name to Kimball or sold it. I doubt if anyone would be able to revive the brand name without Conn's say-so (and plenty of $$$) !
      Bummer. Guess I'll have to kiss up to the Conn powers-that-be now.
      Conn 427M Deluxe Caprice (1959) | Kimball 792 Swinger (1975, gutted for MIDI)

      Comment


        #4
        Hi,

        Why would you want to revive the Conn name for organs?

        The Conn Organ name brand did very poorly by the late 70s, I seriously doubt the brand name and any trademarks associated with it would do very well in this very diminished market of today.

        AV

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by arie v View Post
          Hi,

          Why would you want to revive the Conn name for organs?

          The Conn Organ name brand did very poorly by the late 70s, I seriously doubt the brand name and any trademarks associated with it would do very well in this very diminished market of today.

          AV
          I suppose that's true. What would probably be more successful is Conn-sponsored software emulation of their organs (an iPad with a theatrette or artist loaded on it, hooked up to some midi keyboards and a pedalboard, would be awesome beyond belief).
          Conn 427M Deluxe Caprice (1959) | Kimball 792 Swinger (1975, gutted for MIDI)

          Comment


            #6
            Hi

            Why? If there was such a demand that it might be a commercial success, I could understand it, but really, there is no demand to emulate analog classical organ sound, let alone Conn.

            But I'm sure that you are a free man, and there is nothing stopping you from throwing a million or more bucks at a project to emulate Conn organ, and then flog it to all enthusiasts out there. Just don't expect your money back.

            Conn is dead......it is finished............never to be resurrected...........unless someone is really stupid.

            Best is if you are infatuated with Conn...........get a used one. There are still quite a few around.

            AV

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              #7
              Conn 427M Deluxe Caprice (1959) | Kimball 792 Swinger (1975, gutted for MIDI)

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Firepowerforfreedom View Post
                Would it be possible to revive the Conn brand (separate from Selmer-Conn)?
                Why would any sane person want to recycle that which was a dog in the first place?
                sigpic
                Hammond X77GT & Leslie 77P
                Lowrey C500 & Leslie 720/540
                Hammond T524 & Leslie 710
                Gulbransen Theatrum & Leslie 700
                Yamaha EL90T

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by crossyinoz View Post
                  Why would any sane person want to recycle that which was a dog in the first place?
                  Are we talking solid-state or tubes? 'Cause my tube Conn is the sweetest organ I've ever heard (next to most of Hammonds's line).
                  Conn 427M Deluxe Caprice (1959) | Kimball 792 Swinger (1975, gutted for MIDI)

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Firepowerforfreedom View Post
                    So, when Kimball killed off its organ division, what happened to the Conn organ trademark? Would it be possible to revive the Conn brand (separate from Selmer-Conn)?
                    According to the US trademarks database, C.G Conn and CONN are still a live trademarks of Conn-Selmer, Inc.
                    Last edited by gtc; 03-22-2011, 06:36 AM. Reason: Corrected
                    -------

                    Hammond M-102 #21000.
                    Leslie 147 #F7453 in the queue.
                    Hammond S-6 #72421

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Hi,

                      I think you are dreaming in technocolour. But I will not stand in the way if you really want to proceed with this.

                      First of all, for a emulation of an organ (of any type), requires more than a little programming ability. It requires a deep knowledge of programming and what makes what one wants to emulate. I'm not sure whether an i-Pad is even powerful enough to do the project well enough to do a serious emulation. Even then, it will take considerable amount of time to get it to the point of releasing it.

                      Second, even if you get the front end done (the electronic simulation), you then have to copy the audio. Conn used speakers as the final filter, and also used Leslies on some channels. Having heard some of the latest Leslie simulators, I can tell you, that they still have not duplicated the rotor speaker which moves air physically like the Leslie does. I doubt that one could easily emulate Conn pipe speakers through just a simple "app".

                      Anyways, I am waiting with eager anticipation for the Conn app.

                      Or, am I being conned here?

                      AV

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by gtc View Post
                        According to the US trademarks database, C.G Conn and CONN are still a live trademarks of Conn-Selmer, Inc.
                        So they must have licensed, rather than sold, the name to Kimball then.

                        Well, I've got to find a developer first, but I know a few personally who might be interested. I wonder what it would take to get Conn-Selmer onboard?
                        Conn 427M Deluxe Caprice (1959) | Kimball 792 Swinger (1975, gutted for MIDI)

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by arie v View Post
                          Hi,

                          I think you are dreaming in technocolour. But I will not stand in the way if you really want to proceed with this.

                          First of all, for a emulation of an organ (of any type), requires more than a little programming ability. It requires a deep knowledge of programming and what makes what one wants to emulate. I'm not sure whether an i-Pad is even powerful enough to do the project well enough to do a serious emulation. Even then, it will take considerable amount of time to get it to the point of releasing it.

                          Second, even if you get the front end done (the electronic simulation), you then have to copy the audio. Conn used speakers as the final filter, and also used Leslies on some channels. Having heard some of the latest Leslie simulators, I can tell you, that they still have not duplicated the rotor speaker which moves air physically like the Leslie does. I doubt that one could easily emulate Conn pipe speakers through just a simple "app".

                          Anyways, I am waiting with eager anticipation for the Conn app.

                          Or, am I being conned here?

                          AV
                          Hmm, sampling might work. It'd preserve some of the tube sound. I know the B3 has been sampled extensively for the iPad already.

                          As to the speakers, there could be an option to use a virtual Leslie or a real Leslie (if you own one). The new Leslies are midi-compatible, so they could be interfaced with the app via USB.

                          The speaker pipes could prove troublesome. I suppose if Conn saw enough of a business opportunity, they might (BIG "might") start to produce them again.
                          Last edited by Firepowerforfreedom; 03-22-2011, 09:14 AM.
                          Conn 427M Deluxe Caprice (1959) | Kimball 792 Swinger (1975, gutted for MIDI)

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Firepowerforfreedom View Post
                            So they must have licensed, rather than sold, the name to Kimball then.
                            The registration trail on the database shows just two owners: CG Conn in 1912 and now Conn-Selmer, however I suspect the full record would show a chain of trademark ownership changes through the years.

                            Well, I've got to find a developer first, but I know a few personally who might be interested. I wonder what it would take to get Conn-Selmer onboard?
                            If you can put together a professionally developed business case then you may get them interested. In the meantime you could sound them out via their CEO at the expense of a postage stamp. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
                            -------

                            Hammond M-102 #21000.
                            Leslie 147 #F7453 in the queue.
                            Hammond S-6 #72421

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by gtc View Post
                              The registration trail on the database shows just two owners: CG Conn in 1912 and now Conn-Selmer, however I suspect the full record would show a chain of trademark ownership changes through the years.



                              If you can put together a professionally developed business case then you may get them interested. In the meantime you could sound them out via their CEO at the expense of a postage stamp. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
                              Worth a shot, I guess.
                              Conn 427M Deluxe Caprice (1959) | Kimball 792 Swinger (1975, gutted for MIDI)

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