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The Ancient Hydraulis

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  • The Ancient Hydraulis

    I found this earlier and thought I would share it. It Explains about the very first organs, which were water powered. It's a good way to get to know where our beloved instruments derived from.

    It is about 10 minuets long, so this is for the people with the faster broadband connections.

    Windows Media 300k
    Real Media 300k


  • #2
    Re: The Ancient Hydraulis

    10 'Minuets' long, eh?
    And just how long is each minuet, and who wrote them? LOL
    Could this be rare footage of one of Laurens Hammond's earlier prototypes of the famous 'Waterwheel Generator', perhaps.

    Seriously, nice bit of info to share, thanks.

    Andy G
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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    • #3
      Re: The Ancient Hydraulis

      Ah, the ancient Hydraulus!

      That's when organists had a fun job, playing at street carnivals and orgies.

      Wasn't one of the earliest examples of a hydraulus discovered at Roman Aquincum in Hungary, which has a re-created copy of the original?

      The one in the picture looks suspiciously like a modern player-organ to me, but maybe it doubles up as an automated Archimedes screw; delivering water to the fire department.

      Not much chance of "fiddling while Rome burns" with that little number, I guess.

      Regards,

      MM

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      • #4
        Re: The Ancient Hydraulis

        AndyG- Minutes, sorry, listening to Bach, you know how it is

        MusingMuso- I believe the article I read said that the above picture was a recreation to the exact plans that they found in Rome somewhere. I'll have to re-read it though.

        Interesting Note: Looks like the keyboard is all naturals.....kinda hard to play I would think.

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        • #5
          Re: The Ancient Hydraulis

          I'll re-check my sources on the Aquincum organ also and try and post a URL for comparison.

          Regards,

          MM

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          • #6
            Re: The Ancient Hydraulis

            It proved much easier than I thought.

            Here is the URL required:-

            http://www.orgona.hu/index_e.html


            Once into the site of the Pecs organ-building company of Hungary (choose the English version with the Union Jack flag), click on the words "organ construction," then on the words "our organs," and finally, on the "details" tab below the photo of the Hydraulus Organ entitled "Budapest fire museum".

            The history is quite fascinating, and there are details of the ancient Roman remains found in a cellar. The blowing arrangement is obviously more authentic on the Hungarian example by Pecs, and of course, there is no player mechanism, as appears to be the case on the organ shown in the first photo leading this thread. I guess that had been added so that people can hear the sort of musical sound it might make.

            Regards,

            MM

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