Ebay Classic organs

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  • Hello...

    Hi. Just thought I'd introduce myself. I'm Clarence Chaisson, 13, from Boston MA. I've played the organ for two years and piano since I was five. I'd like to build a small pipe organ some day...

  • #2
    Re: Hello...

    Hello Clarence! Welcome to the forums! I'm glad your starting out early with the organ!

    Do you have an organ at home?

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    • #3
      Re: Hello...

      Hi Clarence. Welcome to the fold! Great to see a youngster who plays organ. There aren't many young people playing organ in my neck of teh woods, on this side of the Atlantic, these days. Enjoy yourself looking around here and never be afraid to ask a question. Someone will know the answer!
      Andy G
      It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

      New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

      Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
      Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
      Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
      Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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      • #4
        Re: Hello...

        I was amazed when I found out that two the undergrads in a class I help out with acutally have been taking lessons from the 5th and 8th grade and both own really good insturments, one even owns his own pipe organ. What hath God wrought?


        But anyway Clarence, welcome. Organists are unusually freindly and helpful, if not opinoinated. It is great that you have started so early as then you won't have to panic when you have to play your upper level juries and have to ask yourself, "Waaaaiiitt.. do I REALLY have any clue what I am doing here playing for these people? I've only have 5 years of organ lessons, maybe I should be a pediatrician.

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        • #5
          Re: Hello...

          Thanks!

          Soundboarddude, I don't have an organ at home. We're looking for a digital organ to get, but I'm not sure which brand to go with.

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          • #6
            Re: Hello...

            I think that any good organ with 2 (or more) 61-note manuals, and 36 AGO pedals is worthy of being called a practice instrument.

            Does sound really matter? I practice on a wurlitzer that uses Electric Reeds, and I don't care if its not a big Concert organ (in 1956 it was, though).

            You can find some really nice organs on eBay for really modest prices, and though a little dated, provide ample practice value.

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            • #7
              Re: Hello...

              Make thgat 32 AGO pedals--if you' ve ever run across a 36 note pedal clavier, please take a picture & post! I'd like to see such a thing.

              Toodles.

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              • #8
                Re: Hello...

                Right you are, I was thinking of something else. *hits head with frying pan*

                However:
                "At the end of 1984, after tender, the government signed a contract with the Quorin company, for the rebuilding of the organ. The work officially began on June 10th 1985 (service order on June 4th 1985).
                The pedal key consists of 36 notes from the contre-Fa-bass (FO) to Mi treble."

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                • #9
                  Re: Hello...

                  Some people in our town are selling an old Conn organ w/ a full pedalboard...I think for $200 plus the cost to move it. It has no pistons or anything like that, and it needs some work (some stops aren't working). We're not sure if we should get this or wait to see if we can find a newer organ...

                  Does Conn even make organs any more?

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                  • #10
                    Re: Hello...

                    Hey Clarence,

                    Welcome to the forum. Sorry I can't help with the Conn delema as I'm one of the resident Hammond freaks. It's great to have you along and to see more young people discovering the organ as their main instrument. You are fortunate to have the resourses available to you many of us did not when we where young. On my folks budget it was drum sticks and a practice pad or nothing!

                    Good luck and good music,

                    Rich

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                    • #11

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                      • #12
                        Re: Hello...

                        Wow! It's too bad it doesn't go down to C - I mean, I love A probably more than C, but I am amazed at how often I hit low C on the pedal board. Hah, it's like that Bosendorfer piano I brought up somewhere on here.

                        About Conn organs. We were discussing one on ebay earlier on the forums. Of course, (most likely), you won't get the sound that you'll want, but it would be great for practice, and for a cheap price!

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                        • #13
                          Re: Hello...

                          Wow. 35 pedal notes, and the manuals only have 58 keys each.

                          My only worry about the Conn organ is that if anything broke other than whats already broken, there is no Conn company left to buy parts from...

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                          • #14
                            Re: Hello...

                            if anything broke other than whats already broken

                            Haha, then it's time to get another organ! If you're only spending 200 on it, it would be good while it lasted, but if it did ever stop working, it wouldn't have been a waste of money.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Hello...

                              Clarence,

                              I used to work on Conns for many years, during and after my tenure as a tech at a music store where we sold them. They've been out of the organ business since the late 70s. They're decent organs but have too many proprietary parts to keep them running for a long time without it getting very expensive. I owned an 825 Classic (2m AGO), but finally gave up on keeping it playable and switched to analog Rodgers from the mid 60s to mid 70s vintage for my own instruments.

                              The beauty of Rodgers from that era is that except for the oscillator coils, all the electrical and mechanical components can be replaced with off-the-shelf parts from various sources. I'm in the process of rebuilding and customizing a model 34A 3m from around 1964, and so far, I've been able to find everything I need online from Digikey, Mouser, eBay, etc. Even the 2N1303 germanium transistors for the oscillators and audio circuits were apparently made by TI and Raytheon in massive numbers at the time and are still available on eBay, which is where I got my current stash of 100.

                              I also have a 1970 vintage 660 3m as my regular practice instrument and just got a 1988 vintage 760 2m for our local choral society performances. The latter is microprocessor-based and a bit more of a challenge, but it's still well supported by the dealers.

                              Tom Nelson
                              Milford, NH
                              Rodgers 660 with additional analog rack sets (practice), 36D/C in digital conversion, Yamaha CVP-107

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