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    So I have a Casio keyboard (just a normal one). I just play some easy songs on it. Whenever I find a piano I use that instrument.
    How should I go from there to learn playing the pipe organ?

  • #2
    Now, that IS a big step!!! Casio keyboards range from just over an octave to full-sized 88-note piano keyboards. Is there a way you could provide a model number so we'd have a reference for what you're used to? That would help us advise you better.

    On a totally different note, the Casio keyboards I have at work all have lost touch sensitivity on G above Middle C. The velocity appears to range between 10 and 127. Is that a common flaw of the instrument?

    Welcome to the Forum, and hope you enjoy your stay here.

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

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    • #3
      Originally posted by myorgan View Post
      Now, that IS a big step!!! Casio keyboards range from just over an octave to full-sized 88-note piano keyboards. Is there a way you could provide a model number so we'd have a reference for what you're used to? That would help us advise you better.

      Michael
      Casio WK-3000

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by henrik.hank View Post
        Casio WK-3000
        Henrik,

        Check the following posts:I obtained these results by doing a quick search from the main page for "beginning organist".

        I'd suggest starting with some beginning classical pieces like Haydn's Clock pieces (available free online), and other pieces that were written for organs without pedals (i.e. English Voluntaries--there's been a thread on that lately).

        Maintaining a legato touch by using finger substitution and proper fingering, as well as learning to share the parts between hands will help you transition from a keyboard/piano to the organ. There is no sustain pedal, and often no reverberation to continue the sound, so once the key is let up, the sound stops. The trick is to play with legato technique.

        I hope this gets your started.

        Michael
        Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
        • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
        • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
        • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

        Comment


        • #5
          But how do I practice my organ feet on my Casio? Sometimes I may be able to practice using a small electrical organ which has organ pedals.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by henrik.hank View Post
            But how do I practice my organ feet on my Casio? Sometimes I may be able to practice using a small electrical organ which has organ pedals.
            I apologize for not getting back to you sooner. In your original post, you didn't specify that you were wanting to learn pedal technique. My recommendations were for hands only, and learning the basic technique used to play organ with your hands. I thought you were wanting to learn organ technique using your Casio.

            For pedal technique, search the entire Forum for "Pedal Technique", and I'm sure you'll find a thread that came around about 1-2 years ago. There were excellent suggestions in that thread.

            Hope this helps.

            Michael
            Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
            • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
            • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
            • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

            Comment


            • #7
              what kind of keyboard/synth should I buy if I want to learn playing both rock/Liturgical music? NORD C2D?

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              • #8
                A hammond RT2 or RT3 would have 32 pedals and two 61 key keyboards like a pipe organ, and rock and roll sounds. About $200 unrestored around here. They have the same tone generator as a Hammond B3 (R&R standard organ) but don't cost very much because the case is long and difficult to move.
                Hammond E100 or E300 and H100, H200, H300 are durable instruments that don't cost very much. $50-100 around here. The H100,H200 or H300 has better pipe organ sounds. Both of these have 25 pedals, more suited for low church literature than high, although I'm playing both JS Bach (2 part inventions, Passacaglia & Fugue in C min) and Lynyrd Skynyrd on mine. Also Johnny Mercer, Kingsmen, and Henry Mancini. Both have two 61 key keyboards. JSB's P&F in Cmin has a very repetative bass line and I've learned 3 pages of it cold without any boring exercises or tuneless student pieces to grind through. I'm a pretty fair piano fan, however. Page 3 has some tricky fingering turns.
                The RT2 or RT3 will need about 6 electrolytic caps replaced. A E100 needs about 6 and sounds more like new with two dozen. An H100 needs 6 and sounds more like new with 71 electrolytic caps. I'm one of the low budget do it yourself repair persons, you can tell. These organs are going to the dump daily, and need to be played by someone, as the tone generators are built to last 100 years IMHO.
                The Lowrey CH32 with 32 pedals can sometimes be found for $200, as it is a rebranded Rogers analog (repairable) organ with a Lowrey case and amp. It is not very suited for rock and roll, however. Actual analog Rogers organs run more to $1000-$2000, and often have deep cases difficult to move into a residence. Baldwin organs are cheap, and often quite repairable. Some model Baldwin are more suited for classical and church music, some are more suited to pop music (the theatre models). The church model Baldwins can have deep cases that won't go through a door, also.
                I avoided buying a spinet organ with 12 or 13 pedals for 25 years because they don't fit the JS Bach piece I wanted to play. At least 25 pedals gets you used to using both feet at once, instead of left foot only like a lounge popular or gospel player. Rock and Roll players tend to not use the pedals at all, but they all have friends that can play the bass line on the bass guitar. I find it more convenient to play the bass line with my feet on R&R and pop.
                Last edited by indianajo; 10-14-2012, 02:09 PM.
                city Hammond H-182 organ (2 ea),A100,10-82 TC, Wurlitzer 4500, Schober Recital Organ, Steinway 40" console , Sohmer 39" pianos, Ensoniq EPS, ; country Hammond H112

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                • #9
                  The Nord is quite a capable instrument in that it has Hammond and baroque pipe sounds, but you'd need a set of pedals to go with it, and for liturgical use, that means at least 25. Roland make a suitable set but they are expensive.

                  Depending on where you are, you should be able to pick up a decent practice organ for next to nothing. That rock/liturgical combination makes me lean towards Hammond. Indie's mentioned some of the suitable Hammonds, add the A100 to that list.
                  It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

                  New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

                  Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
                  Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
                  Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
                  Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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