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Lowrey TLO-R needs a home in Minneapolis area - at least for now.

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  • Lowrey TLO-R needs a home in Minneapolis area - at least for now.

    I am moving out of my apartment - have to be completely out in a week, and have no way to move this organ or a place to move it to. Is is worth me going to great expense to try to keep it? Or should I give it away to someone who will haul it away for parts? Or is there a chance of finding a buyer before then or someone who would just keep it for me for awhile? It does have built in Leslie speakers and I understand there is some demand for those. Its best characteristics, I think, are that it can play loud enough to send the dog into hiding (especially the bass pedals) or soft enough that the neighbors across the hall can't hear it. Please advise!

  • #2
    It's an old lady now, approaching her 50th birthday. If it's still working fine and you enjoy playing it, then I'd try to keep it. Great expense? I guess you mean transport costs. Well, the organ, nice though it is, is not a 'classic' instrument and realistically is worth zero in todays' market. Selling it will be difficult even if it's 100% perfect. If it needs any work (and at nearly 50 I'd guess that it might do) then no-one will buy it and you may well struggle to give it away. The only hope on that score is that someone might just want that inbuilt leslie unit. Sad to see a nice organ parted out but better than landfill for the whole thing, though that's the even sadder fate that may await it. That's just the way the market is. Best of luck with finding a home for it.
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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    • #3
      Try to keep it. No one will ever love it as well as you do. If you have any friends with a truck it will be an easy move if you aren't leaving the area.

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      • #4
        Does it have a "Marimba Repeat" button? If so, it's best quality is that it can play Baba O'Reily!

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        • #5
          No, it's the Heritage that had that feature Wes, along with some later models, TBO Berkshire and the GAK series.
          It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

          New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

          Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
          Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
          Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
          Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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          • #6
            A small correction: the TLS, TLS-R, TLO and TLO-R Holidays all had the repeat circuit called Marimba Repeat in some models. The secret was that the upper manual keyswitch voltage keying buss was broken up into alternate 3-note groups connected to two pulse generators which turned the signals off and on alternatively, simulating a marimba. The repeat circuit was on a chassis, usually mounted atop the expression pedal dog house.

            . . Jan
            the OrganGrinder

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            • #7
              That's interesting, Jan. I've played plenty of them that haven't had it. Maybe a US thing, as our early Lowreys may have been assembled from kits.
              It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

              New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

              Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
              Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
              Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
              Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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              • #8
                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZwOq0tTEPE
                I might be able to keep it if I could find a couple strong folks to help me move it. I have until Wednesday morning to get it and everything else out. My friend came over with his pickup but said there was no way the two of us could do it.
                Also, would be terrible for it to sit in a garage for awhile. I am moving in with my Mom and there is just no place to put it.

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                • #9
                  I don't know, I have 2 organs in the garage. Keep sheet plastic or tarps over them, the dust is terrible out there.
                  I've moved a 400 lb Wurlitzer up the stairs and into the house by myself. Two guys should be able to handle any console or spinet (not church building sized). You need a ramp probably, I use 3 2"x8"x8' boards salvaged from a water bed frame out for the garbage. I slide the organ up the ramp on UHMW plastic, a 2'x4'x1/16" piece I bought from Mcmaster.com. In Minneapolis you probably have a Cadillac Plastics outlet in town that might sell UHMW. I wrap a car tow strap around the organ, under the legs, tie a rope loop on one end, stick a pipe through an interior door padded from the wall by phone books, loop a rope around that. Then I hook up the organ to the pipe with chain and a porta-pull (lever/winch engine pulling device) and crank the organ up the ramp. I keep the organ from tipping over by suspending it from a lifting eye above the porch, but if you have a second guy, he can balance it upright.
                  As far as horizontal moves, the 4 wheel dollies you can rent at U-haul aren't too bad. Tip the organ on its side, the pedal unit is fragile in some models. Lifting the organ, my reliable helper has a hernia repair, so he doesn't lift. I lift one end, he stacks 2"x6"x18" boards under the end I am lifting. Then I lift the other end and he puts the 4 wheel dolly under it (hammonds can ride on the cart from the bottom). Models without a substantial bottom, you'll have to tip it on its side first.
                  city Hammond H-182 organ (2 ea),A100,10-82 TC, Wurlitzer 4500, Schober Recital Organ, Steinway 40" console , Sohmer 39" pianos, Ensoniq EPS, ; country Hammond H112

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