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    Computer Question, Please . . .

    I am still happily running Windows XP. I realize that Microsoft no longer supports this. The one update that I still get sometimes is a "malicious software removal tool." I just got the December 2014 update. What does this mean? Does this tool sit on my computer and automatically remove malicious software as it comes in - or - is it a program on my computer that I am supposed to access and run if I suspect that my computer has been infected?

    I have the free version of Malwarebytes which I run almost daily and it almost never finds anything - I would go so far as to say virtually never.

    Thank you!

    #2
    I've never bothered with the 'tools' that came with the updates. In fact, my XP system hasn't had any updates for years. Good AV software and a firewall, plus common sense when on the net.

    I also run Malwarebytes on that system and it's never found anything. Same with this one in the school.

    So I guess it's a run as required tool that simply isn't required!
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Menschenstimme View Post
      The one update that I still get sometimes is a "malicious software removal tool." I just got the December 2014 update.
      It automatically runs once when it is downloaded. It's not intended to protect you from malicious software -- it's only to remove it.

      As a software developer by trade, I can say without a doubt, not applying OS patches is risky and inadvisable no matter how careful you are and regardless of what protections you have in place. Very simply, malicious software targets both the known and unknown security weaknesses of unpatched machines. Your anti-virus software can only detect known malicious software, so your unpatched system is more vulnerable to new exploits than one that has had the security holes plugged. The damage to your system and the compromise of your data can occur long before your anti-virus software vendor issues an update dealing with a new exploit and is able to detect it.

      It's your data, so how much you value it is up to you. Just know, that if you're running XP today, and especially an unpatched one, hackers have you in their crosshairs.
      -Admin

      Allen 965
      Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
      Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
      Hauptwerk 4.2

      Comment


        #4
        Very true and good advice, but of course unknown malware can also cause problems before the Microsoft patch arrives. Maybe I've just been lucky all these years, then! Not one nasty - ever!

        Yes, an XP system on line these days is open to all sorts of threats. The XP 'half' of this PC therefore has all its network connections disabled and therefore no connection to the outside world. It handles all the music apps that I just can't be bothered to spend hours setting up again on the other 'half'. XP runs them all just fine, except the 64 bit stuff, of course! Win 7 - on auto update - is the main OS on this 'half'.

        As for the one in the school, it's not mine and the school's tech staff are responsible for its welfare. And, very sensibly, absolutely no data is kept on it at all, other than a few MIDI and audio files.
        It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

        New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

        Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
        Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
        Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
        Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by andyg View Post
          Very true and good advice, but of course unknown malware can also cause problems before the Microsoft patch arrives.
          Sure, but the point of patching your system is to protect yourself from new exploits of known vulnerabilities.

          BTW, when I say patching your system, I mean more than just OS updates. Third party software such as Flash, Java, PDF readers, etc. that run in your browser as well as the browser itself are also malware vectors and should be updated when security revisions are issued.

          Yes, an XP system on line these days is open to all sorts of threats.As for the one in the school, it's not mine and the school's tech staff are responsible for its welfare. And, very sensibly, absolutely no data is kept on it at all, other than a few MIDI and audio files.
          The Internet is not the only way malware can be distributed. The Stuxnet Trojan that brought down Iran's centrifuges was likely propogated by a USB thumb drive.

          http://www.cnet.com/news/stuxnet-del...n-thumb-drive/
          Last edited by Admin; 12-10-2014, 04:21 PM.
          -Admin

          Allen 965
          Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
          Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
          Hauptwerk 4.2

          Comment


            #6
            I'll second everything admin says; I have a similar background. Update. Please.

            Comment


              #7
              I'll third everything above! Symanatec admitted that they only get about 40% in the first place. The truly new virii (zero-day) are often in the wild for weeks/months before they get added to virus signatures.

              Stux was amazing. My workplace had some vulnerable Siemens controllers, but did not get it. I had the network guys block the C&C ips regardless.

              One of the reasons I remain a Linux fanboi is that every piece of software you have installed can be continually updated, not just the OS.
              Unwanted Bitcoin? Dispose of them safely here:14hjbheQVki8eG75otRK4d2MQBarCCWQfJ

              Comment


                #8
                I think he said that the XP half of his machine does not have an Internet connection. Should that not protect him from virii?

                David

                Comment


                  #9
                  Just as a side note, you might consider upgrading your Windows. I resisted giving up XP for a long time, but now am happily using 8.1 and wouldn't go back to XP for anything. It was a no-brainer when I moved up, because I was getting a new computer and it came with 8 installed (followed soon by the free 8.1 upgrade). I had gone to the Office Depot looking for a new battery backup for my XP machine and realized that the backup device was going to cost nearly half of what I wound up paying for a brand new decent no-frills Lenovo laptop (which needs no battery back up, of course).

                  Before making the leap to 8, I had in fact used Windows Vista for a few months on another laptop that I wound up giving to my daughter, and I thought Vista was fantastic (ducking to avoid the tomatoes and rocks). People hated on Vista, but it was so much smoother and more refined than XP, had a wonderful basic photo editor built into the photo viewing program, connected to the internet almost automatically everywhere I took it, and never once gave me the blue screen of death. So I knew there was life after XP, but I needed a little push to make the move.

                  At first I didn't like the cheesy, cheap, smart-phone-looking face of 8, but with 8.1 it's easy to make it look almost exactly like any of several previous versions of Windows. I miss having a fully-functional Start menu, but I've learned to use the "tiles" and have also "pinned" every important app and program to the task bar for instant access.

                  The neat photo editor I'd loved so much in Vista was not on my new 8 machine, but I downloaded the free Microsoft Essentials package and there it was! So I'm a happy 8 user now. If you've been holding onto an XP machine out of fear of changing to 8, you might find that it's really OK.

                  Updates and lots of other stuff that you have to think about and deal with under XP just take care of themselves in Windows 8, so there's less to worry about all around. Only drawback I've found -- a couple of really nice old DOS programs that I've used for 25 years no longer run in native mode (a database and a checkbook program that work better than any Windows counterpart I've tried). But I found a program called "DOS Box" that lets even the most ancient DOS programs run under 8.1, so I was able to keep them.
                  John
                  ----------
                  *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I cleaned up lots viruses Jin the early 1990s. This was long before internet connections were available to the common man.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Admin posted a good link about the Stuxnet event, it's quite amazing. Several years ago, some software company inadvertently sent out infected CDs with their own product on it. For two years Sony purposefully delivered 22 million legally purchased audio discs with a rootkit on it.

                      Being online is the highest risk factor, but keeping XP offline does not guarantee anything.
                      Unwanted Bitcoin? Dispose of them safely here:14hjbheQVki8eG75otRK4d2MQBarCCWQfJ

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Perhaps somewhat off-topic:

                        Does anyone remember that email event February of 2005 when nationwide (or perhaps globally) many of us had access problems with our email because some kind of security patch was implemented that did not take all of the possible impcts into account?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Menschenstimme View Post
                          Perhaps somewhat off-topic:

                          Does anyone remember that email event February of 2005 when nationwide (or perhaps globally) many of us had access problems with our email because some kind of security patch was implemented that did not take all of the possible impcts into account?
                          I don't, but I remember the ILOVEYOU virus that spread via email in 2000 and caused the Pentagon, the CIA, UK Parliament, and most US corporations to take their systems offline. Damage was estimated to be $10 billion.

                          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ILOVEYOU
                          -Admin

                          Allen 965
                          Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
                          Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
                          Hauptwerk 4.2

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
                            Just as a side note, you might consider upgrading your Windows. I resisted giving up XP for a long time, but now am happily using 8.1 and wouldn't go back to XP for anything.
                            I would be wary of using Windows 8.1 for any virtual organ application. I bought a new laptop to use with my two-manual MIDIfied organ console. But its Windows 8.1 could not read the encoder MIDI messages (they were no problem to XP or to Windows 7, or to Puppy Linux or to Ubuntu Linux). So I installed a dual boot, and everything works very well under Ubuntu Linux. Even installing a dual boot with Ubuntu on a Windows 8.1 is not easy because of the new security file protocol (I forget its name), and I had to call on outside help for this.

                            John Reimer

                            John Reimer

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by j reimer View Post
                              I would be wary of using Windows 8.1 for any virtual organ application. I bought a new laptop to use with my two-manual MIDIfied organ console. But its Windows 8.1 could not read the encoder MIDI messages (they were no problem to XP or to Windows 7, or to Puppy Linux or to Ubuntu Linux).
                              I know that many Hauptwerk users are using Windows 8.1 without a problem.
                              -Admin

                              Allen 965
                              Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
                              Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
                              Hauptwerk 4.2

                              Comment

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