Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How would you weigh an organ?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How would you weigh an organ?

    How would you determine the weight of an organ before moving it to make sure it won't overload the floor, truck, or trailer or to make sure you have enough help with the move?

    This is running off the assumption that there isn't a published weight for the organ.
    Sam
    Home: Allen ADC-4500 Church: Allen MDS-5
    Files: Allen Tone Card (TC) Database, TC Info, TC Converter, TC Mixer, ADC TC SF2, and MOS TC SF2, ADC TC Cad/Rvt, MOS TC Cad/Rvt, Organ Database, Music Library, etc. PM for unlinked files.

  • #2
    I estimated the weight of mine, and figured 2 people could probably handle it, but I weighed it when I got home. On a hard surface I lifted the organ and kicked a scale under one side, then quickly went to the other side to lift the organ level. I waited until I thought the scale got it's reading which it displays for a few seconds, then went around to check it. I did the same on the other side and added both sides. My Allen 530 is about 270lbs, not easy to lift over steps and through a door without piano lifters, but still manageable. Once inside, a sheet of cardboard and/or plastic furniture sliders made pushing it around easy. The HC-15s are about 75lbs each. I'll guess 35lbs bench and 100lbs pedals.
    Allen 530A

    Comment


    • #3
      It appears that the minimum load bearing required for floors is 40 pounds per square foot; an average church console covers about 25 square feet (5 ft by 5 ft) with pedals and bench, so the code would permit a minimum weight of 1000 pounds. I doubt you'll find an organ you'd want to put in your home that would exceed this.

      One of the heaviest electronic organs I know of is the old Rodgers 990, which was specified at 800 pounds. I can't imagine an electronic organ exceeding this.

      Comment


      • #4
        The 40psf is correct for typical residential floor loading, but the majority of the console weight is not distributed evenly over 25sf. If the console base is only 2ft deep then the allowable console load would be around 400lbs.

        Nutball, I might try your method. I was thinking that my organ weighed around 700lbs but maybe it is only 400lbs. It is certainly more awkward to handle than my piano (probably because it is so much larger).
        Sam
        Home: Allen ADC-4500 Church: Allen MDS-5
        Files: Allen Tone Card (TC) Database, TC Info, TC Converter, TC Mixer, ADC TC SF2, and MOS TC SF2, ADC TC Cad/Rvt, MOS TC Cad/Rvt, Organ Database, Music Library, etc. PM for unlinked files.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Nutball View Post
          My Allen 530 is about 270lbs, not easy to lift over steps and through a door without piano lifters, but still manageable. Once inside, a sheet of cardboard and/or plastic furniture sliders made pushing it around easy. The HC-15s are about 75lbs each. I'll guess 35lbs bench and 100lbs pedals.
          Fortunately, Allen posts all their weights in their materials, and a helpful tech will be your best bet.

          Quick correction on the weights:
          • HC-12/HC-14/HC-15 Speakers--90 lbs.
          • Standard Allen AGO Pedals--90 lbs.
          • Bench--46 lbs. (w/o backrest).

          The consoles are differing weights depending on the hardware contained inside. Amplifiers will make the greatest difference in weight. See the attached file for a sample of the information provided by Allen (& a friendly tech).

          Michael
          Attached Files
          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
          • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

          Comment


          • #6
            Don't forget that there is a lot of the weight of the organ in the pedalboard and bench. I've never had any trouble with floors and consoles in the range up to 800 pounds. Also, the PSF distributes, so while there are pressure points, it does get distributed to some extent.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by toodles View Post
              It appears that the minimum load bearing required for floors is 40 pounds per square foot; an average church console covers about 25 square feet (5 ft by 5 ft) with pedals and bench, so the code would permit a minimum weight of 1000 pounds. I doubt you'll find an organ you'd want to put in your home that would exceed this.
              .
              40 pounds per square foot? The surface area of each of my feet is probably less than a square foot total. With my close to 200 pounds, wouldn't I go crashing through a floor that comes anywhere near that low of a requirement? And what about when I throw my wife over my shoulder to carry her? Could it be 40 pounds per square inch?

              The weight of an organ is not borne on the entire bottom, rather than just around the frame of the bottom that touches the ground, so the calculation for weight requirement of the flooring needs to account for that.

              This is probably putting too much thought into it. If your house can't handle an organ, you should probably move to some place safer. Even if you want to fill the room with heavy furniture there probably still isn't a problem in most houses with reasonable structural integrity.
              When I become dictator, those who preach intolerance will not be tolerated.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ShadyJoe View Post
                And what about when I throw my wife over my shoulder to carry her? Could it be 40 pounds per square inch?
                So, what are you trying to say? I won't tell your wife!
                Originally posted by ShadyJoe View Post
                The weight of an organ is not borne on the entire bottom, rather than just around the frame of the bottom that touches the ground, so the calculation for weight requirement of the flooring needs to account for that.
                Good point. For an Allen, the console rests on 4 casters (unless they're removed), so an 800 lbs. console could be said to be 200 lbs. per caster. Of course it's not that simple, but you've made a good point about the structural integrity of a house.

                Michael
                Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

                Comment


                • #9
                  Here's an article that explains why its OK install your organ on your home's floor, although the subject is a safe, the article gives a good understanding. https://www.deansafe.com/will-my-flo...rt-a-safe.html

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I should have checked in on this thread a bit more regularly. Most suspended floors (and stair treads) are also capable of supporting at least a 300lb concentrated load anywhere on the floor (something like one person jumping on floor or picking up their SO). Most concrete suspended floors in public buildings are capable of supporting a 2000lb concentrated load. Additionally, wood capacities are usually adjusted with a factor of safety somewhere between 2.0 and 4.0 depending on several factors. So a floor designed for 40psf and a 300lb concentrated load, it is possible that the floor would likely support 80psf or a 600lb concentrated load. However, if there are any defects then the floor might fail at 80psf or 600lb concentrated load in places. There are a few places in my house where, due to water damage (that I'm in the process of fixing), the floor can't support 200lbs.

                    The issue I was having was that if my console weighed 700lbs (like I thought) and I placed it against certain walls in my house, it would only be supported by two floor joists (which would overload them slightly especially if I stand/sit or put a bookcase of music next to the organ). If I weigh my console and find out that it's less than 500lbs, then I can put it anywhere in the house and not have to worry about anything (except my wife grumbling about it being in the way).

                    I was more curious about ways that an organ could be weighed.

                    Michael, thanks for posting that pdf.
                    Last edited by samibe; 01-10-2018, 09:59 AM.
                    Sam
                    Home: Allen ADC-4500 Church: Allen MDS-5
                    Files: Allen Tone Card (TC) Database, TC Info, TC Converter, TC Mixer, ADC TC SF2, and MOS TC SF2, ADC TC Cad/Rvt, MOS TC Cad/Rvt, Organ Database, Music Library, etc. PM for unlinked files.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The easiest way to weigh an organ is to weigh a truck, then load the organ and weigh it again, subtracting the original weight. That's how the movers do it when they transport the organ. Public scales are available in many places--any trucking firm likely has one or knows where one would be.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by toodles View Post
                        The easiest way to weigh an organ is to weigh a truck, then load the organ and weigh it again, subtracting the original weight. That's how the movers do it when they transport the organ. Public scales are available in many places--any trucking firm likely has one or knows where one would be.
                        I second that! On the farm, we often sent trucks out overweight because my father would put another pound or two in each bag of potatoes we shipped. He said it was for shrinkage, but it was in case there were any culls in the bag. I don't know if any of the trucks were ever stopped for being overweight, but they were required to get weight slips--both empty and full--just in case.

                        Michael
                        Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                        • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                        • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                        • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I found out recently that there is one of those scales at my local landfill. If I don't figure out the weight some other way, at least I'll get a printout of its weight when I take it to the dump at the end of its useful life.

                          I was hoping someone might recommend lugging your organ down to the friendly neighborhood airport and weigh it on the checked bag scales.
                          Sam
                          Home: Allen ADC-4500 Church: Allen MDS-5
                          Files: Allen Tone Card (TC) Database, TC Info, TC Converter, TC Mixer, ADC TC SF2, and MOS TC SF2, ADC TC Cad/Rvt, MOS TC Cad/Rvt, Organ Database, Music Library, etc. PM for unlinked files.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by samibe View Post
                            I was hoping someone might recommend lugging your organ down to the friendly neighborhood airport and weigh it on the checked bag scales.
                            I would think that almost any organ would weigh a lot more than the maximum designed into baggage scales, not to mention the problem with size.

                            David

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by davidecasteel View Post
                              I would think that almost any organ would weigh a lot more than the maximum designed into baggage scales, not to mention the problem with size.

                              David
                              i agree with you!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X