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organist in residence - meaning

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  • organist in residence - meaning

    Hello
    I am not native English speaker, I am translating into English some documents about a fund raising for a restoration of an instrument from 19th century.
    The question is about the exact meaning of "organist in residence". Does it mean just that the musician is the main player of a certain organ, even if on voluntary basis or it explicitly means that he earns a salary?
    If the organist of a church is there permanently but unpaid, would you use a different term?

    thank you

  • #2
    The term "organist in residence" probably refers to the person who is currently the regular player of the organ, the one who plays for services and oversees the organ. This is probably a salaried position, but could in fact be just an honorary title. Some universities have a "composer in residence" who is normally a member of the faculty, who also composes and publishes music. Adding "in residence" to the title simply means that he or she is currently using the church or school as a "home base," but the title does not necessarily mean it is a salaried post.

    I hope that isn't too confusing. Since you are not a native English speaker, could you tell specifically who the person is with that title? Someone on the forum may be familiar with that person's situation and be able to give you details about the meaning of the title.
    John
    ----------
    *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

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    • #3
      Also, not yet pertinent, but please tell us your native language. It can help us understand if you use an unfamiliar idiom. But so far your English is excellent. I would not have known that it wasn't your primary language if you hadn't mentioned it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by doppiopunto View Post
        If the organist of a church is there permanently but unpaid, would you use a different term?
        Would the term presiding organist work? It would indicate the organist would be the head official over the organ, but not necessarily be paid.

        Welcome to the Forum, BTW.

        Michael
        Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
        • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
        • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
        • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
          [...] Since you are not a native English speaker, could you tell specifically who the person is with that title?
          The person with that title is myself!
          I need to translate an interview that I released, talking in third person. When I refer to myself, I am not sure if I have to say "the organist in residence" or not. I am not paid even if I am qualified because it is not very common in my country, except for very important parishes in large cities which is not my case.
          The purpose is to let the reader understand that I am the person who regularly plays that instrument and who has the knowledge to talk about it's history, problems, and so on.
          For example: "The organist (in residence??), Mr....., said that the organ at the moment is affected by several problems like woodworms... " and bla bla.

          Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post
          Also, not yet pertinent, but please tell us your native language. It can help us understand if you use an unfamiliar idiom. But so far your English is excellent. I would not have known that it wasn't your primary language if you hadn't mentioned it.
          Wow! I did not expect that! I thought I use some inappropriate phrasing sometimes. I am Italian, BTW (as my nickname suggests).
          Last edited by myorgan; 02-14-2018, 06:32 PM.

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          • #6
            Without any further information, I would say that your usage of the title is correct. The only way that I think it would be incorrect is if there was at least one other person you could apply it to.

            Again, your English is better than most native speakers these days.

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            • #7
              Is this what the French mean with the phrase "Titular Organist"? i.e. - organist in title only, not necessarily a salary?
              I'm not sure about this, so feel free to correct me.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by regeron View Post
                Is this what the French mean with the phrase "Titular Organist"? i.e. - organist in title only, not necessarily a salary?
                I'm not sure about this, so feel free to correct me.
                My understanding is that you are correct. In Italian we say "organista titolare" which is very similar to the French expression.
                However, as I said, in Italy it is widely used but in an inappropriate way. In fact, it is very common that the organist is there, playing the organ of that church (exclusively?), just because he agreed with the priest that he would do so, maybe unpaid, but in any case on the basis of a verbal agreement only. In other words, usually there is no official appointment of the "organista titolare".
                This is why I asked: the literal translation is easy, but I suspected that in English it necessarily meant that there is some kind of formal appointment.
                However, I think I will use this translation without worrying too much, based on the replies I got here.

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                • #9
                  When I hear "organist in residence", it makes me think of "artist in residence" which is different from what you describe. The "artist in residence" is someone intentionally invited to practice their art in a way that allows for cultural interchange for a specific and limited period of time. Here are two articles about "artists in residence". I'm not sure if that has an influence on what others think about "organist in residence", but it doesn't feel like a permanent appointment.

                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artist-in-residence
                  https://www.definitions.net/definiti...t-in-residence

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                  • #10
                    I once asked to the adorable lady and marvelous organist JOYCE JONES about the meaning of this title...her title in Waco University: Organist in Residence. She told me that it referred to her official position at the university, her residence there, and the freedom to travel to give concerts, seminars, etc. elsewhere.

                    Luis

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