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  • Royal Wedding - Windsor Chapel

    Just watching and listening to the Royal Wedding in Windsor Chapel. As an American, it's nice to hear music done well in a wedding, in a church/chapel, and publicly. I would imagine for some of the Americans there (& maybe some of the English), it's an education on what music in the church could be.

    It was disappointing to hear snippets of the organ, and orchestra prelude; all the while people were talking rather than listening. It made me not feel so alone as I play the prelude at my church. Even then, Ralph Vaughn-Williams' Greensleeves and other English music did command the attention of those present.

    Now, to the organ. I don't remember if John reviewed the Windsor organ in his recent travels, but if he's watching the wedding--pass the tissues! Arkansas is about to have a flood.O:-) The Harrison & Harrison organ sounded so nice. I couldn't imagine playing such an instrument on short notice--with divisions all over the chapel--some in the choir screen, some in the nave, and some in the balcony. I would imagine it would allow the organ to be heard well in every location of the chapel. It would certainly be a privilege to play that instrument. I wonder who the organist is?

    Sorry for the long post. At least it's shorter than the sermon!;-)

    Michael

    P.S. I wonder if Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller ever thought Stand By Me would be used for a Royal Wedding?

    P.P.S. The announcer just stated the organist for the wedding is Luke Bond.
    Last edited by myorgan; 05-19-2018, 04:52 AM.
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

  • #2
    Truly lovely organ! A gem that doesn't get a lot of publicity. This is one that I have not seen or heard in person, though it's on my "bucket list" for England. Luke Bond certainly acquitted himself well and displayed some of the most beautiful sounds.

    It is such a joy to see and hear a wedding "done right" in this day of "anything goes" ceremonies. I understand that a bride and groom have the privilege of choosing their music and even designing their own vows (in non-liturgical churches at least), but there is something to be said for TRADITION and ORDER and MAJESTY! Whoever started telling brides "it's YOUR day, so do it YOUR way" ???

    I was actually sitting there thinking that church can be that glorious (well, almost) every Sunday if people would just stop demanding their "preferred style" of music. Why can't we have the BEST music in church all the time? Why do we have to stoop to bringing in a type of music that is just one step removed from the night club, the rock concert, the cocktail lounge?

    End of that rant. Thanks for starting this thread, Michael. It was a lovely event indeed filled with wondrous music!
    John
    ----------
    *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

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    • #3
      Originally posted by myorgan View Post
      I couldn't imagine playing such an instrument on short notice--with divisions all over the chapel--some in the choir screen, some in the nave, and some in the balcony. I would imagine it would allow the organ to be heard well in every location of the chapel. It would certainly be a privilege to play that instrument.
      After making this post, upon further research, I discovered the organ was originally housed entirely in the choir screen, but was split and moved to either side to reduce the obstruction of the window over the altar.

      I would also be remiss to not mention how much I enjoyed hearing the 32' Double Trombone at the end of Guide Me, O Thou Great Jehovah!;-)

      Michael
      Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
      • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
      • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
      • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes! I thought the pedal reeds were among the best features of it. Just pleasant all around -- and it shouldn't surprise me. That's what the Brits do best -- smooth, rich, powerful, ear-pleasing, room-filling. Just the right power too, not overbearing, never shrill or piercing, just perfect support for the singing at every point.

        The rest of the world could learn a thing or two from the British organ builders ;-)
        John
        ----------
        *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

        Comment


        • #5
          The music was perfect.

          The service started out appropriately in the name of God and not as a modernist secular wedding like I had feared. But the sermon about the mysticism of fire was an abomination. I can't get past it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post
            The music was perfect.

            The service started out appropriately in the name of God and not as a modernist secular wedding like I had feared. But the sermon about the mysticism of fire was an abomination. I can't get past it.
            Methinks you wouldn't do well down South.O:-)
            Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
            • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
            • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
            • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

            Comment


            • #7
              A couple of comments: "It was disappointing to hear snippets of the organ, and orchestra prelude; all the while people were talking rather than listening. It made me not feel so alone as I play the prelude at my church. Even then, Ralph Vaughn-Williams' Greensleeves and other English music did command the attention of those present."
              Somewhat in the congregations defense, I'm sure they had to be in their seats a LONG time without a break before the start. And a long concert deserves an intermission. And (I'm sorry) preludes and postludes have been relegated to "elevator music" by society.
              The church I attend is on the campus of a large university and the choir is largely music students and graduate students. At the time our organist was the professor of organ (obviously [and he certainly is] a skilled musician). At the end of the service they would start gabbing. So I made the comment back in the choir room as we were removing our robes; about professional courtesy. There was a was a professional musician performing and they deserve their respect, just as they would expect if they were performing. So the choir would sit quietly in the loft and listen to the postlude. That lasted for a couple of years until the pastor said the congregation wants to jump up and leave and that exchanging greetings with them was important. So now some of us still stay and listen quietly and others rush back to the business of the world.
              Oh and I started singing along with the Rutter.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by myorgan View Post
                Methinks you wouldn't do well down South.O:-)
                Are there many sermons praising fire in the South? I've not heard any such things come from the Southern Baptists we have in the North.

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                • #9
                  I was actually waiting for the "customary" Canon in D (Pachelbel) which is one of my favorites. This piece featured prominently at William and Kate's wedding. To me it was a bit of a let down not being played at least at some point of the proceedings. But then, it was mentioned that Prince Charles had a finger in the choice of music so he likely does not like Pachelbel enough to have it included.

                  It was a pleasure to watch the entire proceedings thanks to the BBC's full coverage and more.

                  PS. Cannot help but feel sorry for Prince Philip who obviously did not look well at all. He must have made a very special effort to attend. Our best wishes go to him for his health.

                  Nico
                  "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request... B-)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As someone who has played for hundreds of weddings in my career, I personally am not sorry when Pachelbel's Canon is not requested. No offense intended for those people who like it, I do as well. However, there was a time when it was de rigueur for weddings in this area. I have always been grateful when it is not requested because it has become such a cliché. There is such a wealth of great literature that can be played at a pre-nuptial recital, it is a shame when people just want to hear the same selections that have been played at every other wedding in town.
                    Bill

                    My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

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                    • #11
                      I appreciate that they didn't because I really like playing it and hate when people say "that's for weddings."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post
                        Are there many sermons praising fire in the South?
                        I'm not so sure it was praising fire, as it was an extended allegory equating the importance of fire in human history to the importance of love in human history. It's a fair comparison. People who do such sermons do not always necessarily connect the dots for the listener.

                        Michael
                        Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                        • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                        • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                        • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by myorgan View Post
                          I'm not so sure it was praising fire, as it was an extended allegory equating the importance of fire in human history to the importance of love in human history. It's a fair comparison. People who do such sermons do not always necessarily connect the dots for the listener.
                          I hope you're right, and you may be.

                          The impression I (and my wife) got was that he was strongly implying that God is far in the background. And that man, man's invention of fire, and fire itself are far more important.

                          In any case, he made a cardinal error by emphasising that the guy he was quoting was a mystic. I may have lost my ability to listen objectively at that point.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            As someone who has played for hundreds of weddings in my career, I personally am not sorry when Pachelbel's Canon is not requested. No offense intended for those people who like it, I do as well. However, there was a time when it was de rigueur for weddings in this area. I have always been grateful when it is not requested because it has become such a cliché. There is such a wealth of great literature that can be played at a pre-nuptial recital, it is a shame when people just want to hear the same selections that have been played at every other wedding in town.
                            No offense taken! I personally would prefer the old tried and trusted Wedding March meself but alas, been married for decades and not likely to hear it again at my wedding...:->

                            I would have liked to hear more organ though, any wedding without grand organ pieces is kind of half done in my opinion, especially since that beautiful organ was sitting right there...

                            Nico
                            Last edited by myorgan; 05-23-2018, 06:04 AM. Reason: Fix quote.
                            "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request... B-)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Our Sanctuary has the longest main aisle in several counties, so I'm told. We tend to attract "major production" weddings. I've often made the comment "She may never again want organ music again, but when she is at the end of the aisle..." She wants the trumpet fanfare followed by the big processional music. That might not be typical of what happens in most churches.

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