Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mac and Cheese

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mac and Cheese

    Is anyone out there familiar with the music term "macaroni carol"? I came across this reference in a book last night and was unable to find anything much about it. (A google search bears only pasta recipes!) I don't see it listed in any music dictionaries I have. As nearly as I can figure, its a remote reference to a song or carol such as "Angels We Have Heard On High" that includes complete lyrics in two different languages as a normal part of the work. Does anyone know if this is true and if so, where does the term come from and why?

  • #2
    The problem with google searches is that they provide only what you ask for. If you look in a paper dictionary, you are more likely to see that after the entry for "macaroni", you are likely to find the entry for "macaronic" which will answer your question.

    With the correct spelling, a quick google search yields the following definition:

    "macaronic adjective
    mac·​a·​ron·​ic | \-ˈrä-nik \
    Definition of macaronic
    1 : characterized by a mixture of vernacular words with Latin words or with non-Latin words having Latin endings
    2 : characterized by a mixture of two languages"

    Here's the Wikipedia entry:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macaronic_language

    One of the most famous macaronic carols is "In dulci jubilo", mixing Latin with either English or German, depending on where you live or what your mother tongue is.
    *****
    On a related note....

    The question "Why did Yankee Doodle call the feather in his cap 'macaroni'?" is answered in this article:
    https://www.atlasobscura.com/article...what-you-think
    and this one:
    http://mentalfloss.com/article/65651...ather-macaroni

    Comment


    • #3
      Regeron, thanks for the enlightenment!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by regeron View Post
        The problem with google searches is that they provide only what you ask for. If you look in a paper dictionary, you are more likely to see that after the entry for "macaroni", you are likely to find the entry for "macaronic" which will answer your question.

        With the correct spelling, a quick google search yields the following definition:

        "macaronic adjective
        mac·​a·​ron·​ic | \-ˈrä-nik \
        Definition of macaronic
        1 : characterized by a mixture of vernacular words with Latin words or with non-Latin words having Latin endings
        2 : characterized by a mixture of two languages"

        Here's the Wikipedia entry:
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macaronic_language
        You learn something new every day, thanks for this one.

        Comment

        Working...
        X