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  • Johannus Opus 250 Organ

    Our Church has owned the above organ for approx 20 years and we are now having trouble getting enough volume from the controls is there asimple answer.

  • #2
    Re: Johannus Opus 250 Organ



    Lox,</P>


    Yes. It involves a dolly, four strong guys, and a dump truck. (Oops, forgive the saracasm.)</P>


    Seriously, that's a pretty old Johannus, and they weren't building (IMHO) a very durable product back then. I wouldn't encourage you to put a lot of money into it, but it might be a simple fix just to restore the volume.</P>


    If all stops in all divisions are affected equally, it must be something that is common to them all. Does the same expression pedal control all of them? Or is there a master volume control? Those two items could be checked out rather easily just with a physical and mechanical inspection. The master volume knob might need a shot of cleaner/lubrication if it has gotten dirty. If the expression pedal has a small lamp inside it could be burned out.</P>


    Along the same lines, you should carefully check every connection inside the console, especially push-on plugs and card-edge connectors. With great care you can pull out boards that are in sockets, wipe the connectors using a clean cloth dampened with WD-40, and re-insert. In general, you can clean up and tighten up things, on the chance that your problem is merely one of electrical connectivity.</P>


    There are other potentiometers ("volume controls") in the system, and they may take the form of thumb-wheels or miniature screw-turn pots. Again, using extreme caution, you might gently turn each one, applying a tiny drop of control cleaner/lube with a Q-tip if you find one that causes scratchy sound or popping. But you must use care because you could mess things up big time if you don't know what you're doing here. Put the controls back exactly where you found them.</P>


    Beyond that, you could have a voltage that has gone missing or low in the audio system. If you are able and fearless, you might test all the power supply voltages. If you find one that is low, you'd need to determine if a fuse is blown, a rectifier diode has opened up, regulating chip or resisitor gone bad, etc.</P>


    If these simple fixes don't do the trick, you may need a tech. You can find one at www.mitatechs.com</P>


    Search by state or zip code. Good luck!</P>


    John</P>
    <P mce_keep="true"></P>
    John
    ----------
    *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

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    • #3
      Re: Johannus Opus 250 Organ



      Hi,</p>

      I agree with John on these organs. The Opus 220/230/240 and then the 250/260/270 were organs of analog tone generating variety made from the early 80s to late 80s. Generally cheap construction, and cheap sounding as well. To me they had a sound that was akin to an amplified accordion. Not my favourite organ type, even of that era.
      </p>

      Besides what John has mentioned, determine is you have all amps going. Turn the reverb. control off (counter-clockwise), and check every stop for volume level. If you find that certain stops are not sounding you have a dead audio channel. That could mean a dead input to the amp., and blown fuse, bad amp. or bad speaker. Does your organ have external speakers? It is possible that connectors to the reverb board could be the problem or potentiometers on the reverb board.
      </p>

      Unfortunately, these organs are more durable than John gives them credit for. In my neck of the woods, there are still quite a few of them toiling away. To me they are lasting too long and not overly troublesome, other than the usual key contact problems, burned out stop lamps (which are a pain to replace). These organs are not nice to play, don't inspire confidence, and show that they were sold on the basis of low price.</p>

      If you want to do some work on it yourself, make sure you have the schematics of the instrument.</p>

      Arie V.</p>

      </p>

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      • #4
        Re: Johannus Opus 250 Organ



        Arie,</P>


        Is there a listing of Johannus models (old ones) somewhere? I am not familiar with many of them more than 8 or 9 years old. I was speaking only in generalities about this 250.</P>


        My copy of the Mother Of All Organ Lists is not a current one, but it omits Johannus completely, going straight from Hammond to Kimball. (How's that for a steep slope?)</P>


        Anyway, I wonder if anyone out there has the latest version and if it does have Johannus organs on it. (Yes, Jan, I need to cough up the small fee and get me a new one, and I will soon, I promise.)</P>


        John</P>
        <P mce_keep="true"></P>
        John
        ----------
        *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

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        • #5
          Re: Johannus Opus 250 Organ



          John,</p>

          I don't know of any formal listing of Johannus organs. What I can tell you is that very few came to North America before about 1980. The early Johannus organs had Opus #s like 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 etc. Confusing as they resurrected these same numbers for low end digitals in the 90s. </p>

          In about 1981 they came out with a series of digitally keyed divider organs. This series was the 220/230/240. The bulk of their sales were these 3 models, at least in North America. There were some 300 series organs, that were higher end (you could get them in moving drawstop even), and they had more pitch sources, more amps., chiff effects, wind noise to try to make them more realistic sounding. </p>

          In about 1986, they came out with a revised version of the above mentioned organs. They were called the 250/260/270. Sounded and played much like earlier ones. They did improve the capture action a bit, maybe the voicing slightly. For those that wanted a somewhat better sounding instrument, they came out with the 520, which was sort of like the 260, but had chiff and some other extra goodies on them. </p>

          But in the end, just about all of them sounded like budget, square wave sourced organs. </p>

          I suppose considering what else was out there at the time, they were not a bad deal, but I never thought they were all that musical.</p>

          The Johannus company, sprouted some competitors that basically built organs that were similar. All used square wave, divider chips. Companies that come to mind are Cantor, Content, and Eminent. They all sounded like organs of Dutch origin too.</p>

          I'm glad technology has moved on, so the marketplace has better instruments to choose from.</p>

          AV.</p>

          P.S. You could probably get a listing from the Johannus company if you asked them.</p>


          </p>

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          • #6
            Re: Johannus Opus 250 Organ



            Hey guys, I have been ask to check out a Johannus Opus230 for an old lady that is having to leave her home and move in to assisted living. Apparently this console belonged to her husband that passed away about 10 yrs ago. I would appreciate any tips. </P>


            From your posts above, I gather these were imported into in the early 1980s, so these are 25 or more old in age. I have recently repaired and restored a Baldwin 510 analog and a Thomas three manual Trianon analog. Remember the .Welk shows and Bob Ralston ! </P>


            My greatest challenge has been the Orchestrial Manual on the Thomas. The percussion stops have two buss bars for keying. The release of the key, kills the sustain and RESETS the circuit for the next key-down. If the Key-UP contact fails, then the percussion circuit will not respond on the next Key-DN. </P>


            So back to the Johnnus 230 : What proceedures/ck points should I follow to check out this console ? I would start with testing every key-DN of every manualTIMES all stops and ALL pitches. Then all coulpers, etc... Also where would I find schematics, theory, diagrams.. etc ? </P>


            Any tips will be appreciated. </P>

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