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    Enlarging music

    I was prompted by Dogstar's earlier post to write this.

    I have never had good vision but it is good enough to drive with doctor's consent. I'm sixty one. Needless to say I'm no road warrior.

    My question is about getting my music closer. My Electone E-50 has a music rack that is too high and too far away. I could copy music larger and in landscape but I'm also wondering about a modification to the organ itself. I'd rather have not enlarged as much but closer.

    I was considering the use of plexiglass to make it. How does one cut plexiglass with a tablesaw? What kind of blade to use?

    I'd like to see some solutions if anyone in here has ever done something like I've described.

    #2
    You can cut plexiglass with a table saw. Use a reasonably sharp wood saw blade. Don't force the material through. Let the blade do the cutting, don't try to force it or you will crack the plexiglass. Leave the protective plastic on so that it doesn't get scratched while you are cutting and drilling it. The edges can also be sanded but it doesn't take long for a sander to heat up the plastic enough to melt and gum up the sandpaper.
    Last edited by samibe; 02-22-2019, 02:28 PM.
    Sam
    Home: Allen ADC-4500 Church: Allen MDS-5
    Files: Allen Tone Card (TC) Database, TC Info, TC Converter, TC Mixer, ADC TC SF2, and MOS TC SF2, ADC TC Cad/Rvt, MOS TC Cad/Rvt, Organ Database, Music Library, etc. PM for unlinked files.

    Comment


      #3
      Being near Dallas there are probably several plastic suppliers, any of which should cut you a piece to your specifications for very little cost. A piece of .25" thick acrylic cut to size probably wouldn't even be $15
      Tom in Tulsa

      Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

      Comment


        #4
        Libraryguy , I'm with you on wishing for a music desk that's closer to the eye. The Galanti Praludeum II had not much to brag about it's console except that it had a great music desk that was adjustable. It could slide forward towards the organist. I no longer have the organ or any photos but perhaps someone on the Forum owns a PII and can provide some photos. Good luck with your plexi. Use a saw with as many teeth as possible that's designed for fine cut.
        Sam

        Allen ADC5400, Allen ADC4000, 1910 Chickering QuarterGrand
        Past---Galanti Praeludium II, Yamaha Clavinova, Hammond A102, W.W. Putnam Reed Organ

        Comment


          #5
          If I am not mistaken, some music racks have been created which allow the music rack to be rotated up and down to get out of the way of the roll top cover. They are on L brackets, which also allow them to be pulled forward for closer viewing. I've seen it on at least 2 pipe organs and 1 Allen organ. It's probably a custom job.

          Hope that gives you a start.

          Michael
          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
          • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 4 Pianos

          Comment


            #6
            As others have said, cutting plastic on a table saw works nicely. I actually prefer using one compared to other methods. A fine tooth plywood / veneer style blade is what I usually put on the saw to do it. That said, I have occasionally just used the hollow ground combination blade that I usually have in the saw ( too lazy to change blades for a single cut situations ). That worked OK too, but you have to feel how the cut is going to feed it at the correct speed.

            If you are worried about chattering as it cuts, you can sandwich it between two sheets of thin plywood.

            I use a hand held sanding block to finish the edges. Slower of course than any mechanized method, but good results.
            Regards, Larry

            At Home : Yamaha Electones : EX-42 ( X 3 ! ), E-5AR ( X 2, 1 parts, 1 not ), D80 ( parts ), FX-1, FX-20, HS-7T ( parts ), EL-25 ( X 2, 1 chopped, 1 not ). Allen organs : T12-A, T-12B, ADC-6000D. Baldwin 626. Hammond Concorde. Lowrey CH32-1. A bunch of Synthesizers and Keyboards. At Churches I play for : Allen Q325 ( with VISTA ), Hammond A105, Baldwin 720T, Several small and medium size pipe organs of many sorts and builders.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Larrytow View Post
              If you are worried about chattering as it cuts, you can sandwich it between two sheets of thin plywood.
              Thank you for reminding me of this technique. I had forgotten about using this method, and where I'm now entering the stages of finishing the interior of my garage, it is a very timely reminder.

              Michael
              Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
              • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
              • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
              • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 4 Pianos

              Comment


                #8
                Also, if you want clear edges on the plexiglass, you can carefully heat the edges with a heat gun after sanding. Only heat until it goes clear. To much heat and it will bubble.
                Sam
                Home: Allen ADC-4500 Church: Allen MDS-5
                Files: Allen Tone Card (TC) Database, TC Info, TC Converter, TC Mixer, ADC TC SF2, and MOS TC SF2, ADC TC Cad/Rvt, MOS TC Cad/Rvt, Organ Database, Music Library, etc. PM for unlinked files.

                Comment


                • myorgan
                  myorgan commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Would a hair dryer get hot enough?

                  Michael

                • samibe
                  samibe commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I'm not sure. My wife hasn't let me try that one, yet.
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