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  • Baldwin Electro Piano



    http://rochester.craigslist.org/msg/546780254.html</P>


    Does anybody know anything about these?</P>

  • #2
    Re: Baldwin Electro Piano



    Here's my personal experience: </p>

    An electric piano is an electric keyboard, but with a piano style keyboard(with 88 keys) and fewer voices. Also electric pianos will have the usual piano pedals, including soft, reverb, and sustain. Usually the keys are weighted to simulate a piano-like feel. The piano samples are usually the best on these things, followed by the organ and string samples.
    </p>

    On that Craigslist post, they talk about hammers. The hammers on electric pianos are used for touch sensitivity purposes. The hammers work like they do on real pianos, except they strike a device that measures the velocity of the hammers, and therefore the velocity of the keys.</p>

    Of course, electric pianos will have the sound of an electric piano, which is widely imitated by other electronic keyboards. But the real electric pianos are imitative keyboards themselves. I suppose they probably get their electric piano sound from synthesizer samples. My other theory, for what it's worth, is that the original electric pianos weren't imitative keyboards themselves, but used some electromechanical action to get their famous sound. I don't know.</p>

    As for the one on Craigslist, I'd buy it if I were you. $100 sounds like a good deal for these things, if you want one.
    </p>

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Baldwin Electro Piano

      Like a lot of keyboard instrument makers, Baldwin tried their hand at electro-mechanicals. ...And like many of the others, their designs missed the mark in authenticity of piano sound. However, like so many electro mechanicals, they had their own sound characteristics that made them unique and enjoyable. The Rhodes is a prime example of this, it really sounds nothing like an acoustic piano... and can't be made to be. It's great tone and various timbre changing abilities effectively make it a new instrument. For that reason, I really like electros. You ought to try it it out. If you like it, get it. I would.

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      • #4
        Re: Baldwin Electro Piano



        Also, In reference to the first reply: The description given is a reference to digital pianos or "Stage" pianos. The instrument being asked about is an electromechanical or electric piano. An analogue electronic piano, is one that uses electronic circuitry to generate 'piano' tones. Since the Baldwin seems to use strings and electromagnetic pickups, it might sound more like a Yamaha or Kawai (strings) EP, than a Rhodes (tines) or Wurli (reeds). I hope that makes sense.
        </p>

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Baldwin Electro Piano

          [quote user="Hammondlover"]


          http://rochester.craigslist.org/msg/546780254.html</P>


          Does anybody know anything about these?</P>


          [/quote]</P>


          Looking at the previous responses, it looks like NO ONE actually looked at the link. The pictures indicate it has piano strings, probably much shorter than regular pianos. It looks similar to the Yamaha CP-70. If so, they were designed to give a acoustic piano-like sound. Because the strings were shorter, the sound quality wasn't as good as a good acoustic piano. Pianos like this did not have much of a sound board and had pickups to amplify the sound.</P>


          Some more info can be found here:</P>


          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_piano</P>
          <P mce_keep="true"></P>

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Baldwin Electro Piano



            How do you suppose, Bill? I avoided references to the CP-70 because with all the different pickup arrangements that are possible, it may not sound at all like the Yamaha. I try to leave room for that distinction. Also, while the CP-70 is one of the more realistic sounding EPs, (especially in the mid-upper range), the use of two strings per note, length of the bass strings, and lack of a soundboard made them scarcely more realistic than a an electronic clone at the time. The dull rubber band like thud in the bass range makes it especially obvious. </p>

            </p>

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Baldwin Electro Piano

              Those looked like strings, but I was sure they weren't. The buttons on the side looked like preset selector buttons.I had no idea there was actually an instrument like this! I didn't think these existed, so I was thinking that maybe I'll be the first to make one later. Once again, someone stole my idea, 30-somethingyears before I was born. Hey, is this where they get those famed E piano sounds you hear on so many keyboards and stage pianos?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Baldwin Electro Piano



                The patches/tones you'll be looking for on your keyboard/digital piano/synth will be called "E Grand" or "Electric Grand", or possibly "CP70". Not to be confused with "E Piano" etc, which usually refers to Rhodes, Wurli and FM piano type tones.</P>


                I can remember touring with the Kawai equivalent of the CP type grands. Still weighed a ton and you were glad for the roadies (when you had them!). We gave the prototype, called the Pialina and finished in a mix of see through perspex, gloss white and silver, to the James Last Orchestra and they used it for a few years, I think.</P>


                Had the same sound as the CP70, and we did an upright version of it as well. Suffered from the usual 'OMG it's out of tune again!' problems - had to carry a tuning crank around in my case all the time.</P>


                Love the 'rubber band thump' description - I may 'pinch' that!</P>


                Andy</P>
                <P mce_keep="true"></P>
                It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

                New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

                Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
                Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
                Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
                Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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                • #9
                  Re: Baldwin Electro Piano

                  [quote user="Clavier"]


                  How do you suppose, Bill? I avoided references to the CP-70 because with all the different pickup arrangements that are possible, it may not sound at all like the Yamaha. I try to leave room for that distinction. Also, while the CP-70 is one of the more realistic sounding EPs, (especially in the mid-upper range), the use of two strings per note, length of the bass strings, and lack of a soundboard made them scarcely more realistic than a an electronic clone at the time. The dull rubber band like thud in the bass range makes it especially obvious. </P>
                  <P mce_keep="true">[/quote]</P>
                  <P mce_keep="true">"No one" is perhaps incorrect. Another poster seems to be talking about "electronic" pianos with samples. This piano, if labeled correctly, is an electric piano with hammers and strings. The hammers are not there just for "touch sensitivity purposes." Furthermore, "The hammers work like they do on real pianos, except they strike a device that measures the velocity of the hammers, and therefore the velocity of the keys" is not correct. That hammers work like they do on real pianos because they are ALSO hitting REAL strings. I personally feel they were still more realistic than electronic pianos of the same time period (which were analog) simply because they contained many of the same complex overtones that regular acoustic pianos did. The bass was awful on those pianos, though. They simply didn't have the beautiful tone that a regular piano had. Thus they were pretty appropriate for most rock bands.</P>

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Baldwin Electro Piano



                    [quote user="radagast"]</p><p mce_keep="true">"No one" is perhaps incorrect. Another poster seems
                    to be talking about "electronic" pianos with samples. This piano, if
                    labeled correctly, is an electric piano with hammers and strings. The
                    hammers are not there just for "touch sensitivity purposes."
                    Furthermore, "The hammers work like they do on real pianos, except they
                    strike a device that measures the velocity of the hammers, and
                    therefore the velocity of the keys" is not correct. That hammers work
                    like they do on real pianos because they are ALSO hitting REAL
                    strings. I personally feel they were still more realistic than
                    electronic pianos of the same time period (which were analog) simply
                    because they contained many of the same complex overtones that regular
                    acoustic pianos did. The bass was awful on those pianos, though.
                    They simply didn't have the beautiful tone that a regular piano had.
                    Thus they were pretty appropriate for most rock bands.</p>[/quote]

                    </p>

                    Agreed.</p>

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Baldwin Electro Piano

                      Sorry about the incorrect info. On my last visit to Sam Ash, I saw on display in a glass casea cross section of thekey action on a stage piano. That's where I got my information.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Baldwin Electro Piano



                        [quote user="TAlexBrock"]Sorry about the incorrect info. On my last visit to Sam Ash, I saw on display in a glass casea cross section of thekey action on a stage piano. That's where I got my information.[/quote]</P>


                        No problem. Confusion has always happened over the terms "electric" and "electronic", in terms of musical instruments. Throw in "electro-mechanical" and it gets worse.</P>

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                        • #13
                          Re: Baldwin Electro Piano

                          Don't forget electro-pnuemetic []

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                          • #14
                            Re: Baldwin Electro Piano

                            Michael, did you get a chance to try it out?

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                            • #15
                              Re: Baldwin Electro Piano

                              Unfortunately no. I don't have the room for it at the moment, nor

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