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The Postlude - How to get people to listen?

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  • #31
    Re: The Postlude - How to get people to listen?



    Thank you, SB32!</P>


    Actually, that nice wooden sign does appear to be capable of lighting up. I am notorious for posting various notices around at church and our parishioners are notorious for ignoring them. It must the the old "that sign applies to everyone else by me" syndrome?! SIGH!!</P>


    []</P>

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    • #32
      Re: The Postlude - How to get people to listen?

      [quote user="MenchenStimme"]


      Even worse: I had to yell at two choir members who were standing right behind me conversing loudly; and I mean rightbehind me.</P>


      [/quote]</P>


      At least we don't have that problem at my church. At the 0945 service the choir files out quietly after the Benediction and during the Postlude to the choir room to prepare for the next service (or to unrobe and go home); at the 1100 service the choir leaves quietly during the Children's Sermon (before the main sermon) and the remainder of the service is not supported by the choir. Many of us in the choir are not happy with this arrangement (not serving the complete 1100 service) but when the new church was planned the congregation insisted that the choir be positioned in front so the ability of selected members to just leave when they needed to without making a distraction was lost. We used to havethe choir divided into folkswho sang at one or the other service primarily with some from the 0945 staying to sing the anthem at 1100 and then leave. With the choir in the rear balcony (at the old church) the fact that often there weren't a lot of singers in place after the 1100 anthem was not noticed; in the new facility, a choir of less than 50 people looks very meager up front and we are just not able to split the choir into 2 pieces large enough to fill the space properly, even though we have 125 singers on the books (one never has all the singers on any given Sunday unless it is a special occasion, just as one does not have a capacity congregation on ordinary Sundays). Our Choir Director is trying to expand the choir to about 175 singers on the rolls with the hope that this group would allow for dividing into 2 groups, one for each service, that would field about 45-50 singers in each group: at that point he'd feel justified in not wanting the entire choir to stay for 1 1/2 services (he won't insist on everyone staying for both complete services except occasionally). One would think that a 6000-member church could easily find 175-200 people to sing in the choir, especially when there are no auditions for joining.</P>


      You have to see our new facility to understand the visual problem we have. Here's the bare view:</P>


      </P>


      And here's a view with a full choir in place (the organ was being dedicated, which is why the console is so prominent):</P>


      http://flickr.com/photos/budkfumcror...7602884963650/(sorry, it's not my picture).</P>


      I know a lot of the above is off topic, and I apologize. I felt that after I mentioned the choir left in the middle of the 1100 service that some explanation was desirable, and I got carried away.</P>
      <P mce_keep="true"></P>


      David</P>

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      • #33
        Re: The Postlude - How to get people to listen?

        [quote user="cnr1949"]
        <p mce_keep="true">I play a postlude to end the service - in my church it appears to be a signal for everyone to get to their feet and chat
        </p>

        [/quote]</p>

        </p>

        That is the purpose of the postlude, which is to provide music while people are exiting the church. Remember, a church service is not an organ recital. There will always be people who stay to hear the entire postlude, and while that is certainly appreciated, I think it is unfair to expect everyone to sit still and listen to a postlude (going against the function of a postlude). Would you then play a post-postlude?
        </p>

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        • #34
          Re: The Postlude - How to get people to listen?



          I know a church with a fine organ and a fine organist. He plays a 30 minute prelude - the congregation is respectfully silent. He does not hesitate to play large works of literature, and does not hesitate to use full organ if the music requires it.</P>


          Duringthe postlude (which he purposely keeps short) any members of the congregation wishing to chat know to exit quietly; a large portion of the congregation remains to listen, in silence.</P>


          I like that! []</P>

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: The Postlude - How to get people to listen?

            [quote user="soubasse32"]

            I know a church with a fine organ and a fine organist. He plays a 30 minute prelude - the congregation is respectfully silent. He does not hesitate to play large works of literature, and does not hesitate to use full organ if the music requires it.</p>


            Duringthe postlude (which he purposely keeps short) any members of the congregation wishing to chat know to exit quietly; a large portion of the congregation remains to listen, in silence.</p>


            I like that! []</p>

            [/quote]</p>

            </p>

            It's nice, but I think to expect it is to expect too much.</p>

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: The Postlude - How to get people to listen?



              This was a problem 15 years ago when I took on a part time organ job at a local Methodist church. They were about to gut the sanctuary and a pipe organ was to be part of the new set up. 14 months out of the room allowed new precedents to be set when we moved back in. Preludes and postludes were one of the considerations. Now we start with announcements followed by a corporate "call to worship" and then the prelude. That gets everyone settled down and "in the mood"...or mode as the case may be.</P>


              I was ready to do away with the postlude because of past experiences. The minister said that it was a part of the Methodist tradition and therefore part of the service. So it states in the bulletin that "The service is not concluded until the postlude has ended. Please use this time to reflect on your worship experience". I keep it short. Usually an improvisation on a musical part of that morning's service. It's worked like a charm.</P>


              A side note. A quick way to pick out visitors...especially kids. They are the ones standing in the aisle with a stunned look on their face wondering why everyone else isn't racing to the door like they do at their home church.</P>

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              • #37
                Re: The Postlude - How to get people to listen?

                I despair sometimes at my church. The talking was so loud this morning that I could barely hear myself of concentrate during the postlude. I fought on but at one point I almost stopped thinking ' what is the bloody point!' Its just blatant rudeness!I think next week I might just not play anything to see how they react, its not like the majority of them really care what is played anyway. Frankly I don't know why I bother.

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