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Tocatta in Fugue in D minor by J. S. Bach

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  • Vebo
    commented on 's reply
    Wow Lizny! That was a superb performance...thanks!

    Listening to that, I wonder how the structures can endure the harmonic resonances of such big pieces? I think I recall reading an article that said the Boardwalk organ in Atlantic City has 64’ pipes, and they had asked organists to be “judicious” in using it/them? because it caused damage to the building due to harmonic resonance. Maybe that was an exaggeration to glorify the magnificence of the organ?
    Last edited by Vebo; 11-03-2019, 06:53 PM. Reason: I have an oddly spelled name, hate to misspell anyone else's when the name is right there to see. But yes, sometimes I shorten your names to something brief and more “familiar”

  • lizny
    commented on 's reply
    Love the dramatic entrance, but while I adore Jonathan Scott, his isn't my favorite performance of this. Try this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOyHci0j518 - it is the whole suite, toccata at 11:12

  • Vebo
    replied
    Well, for some reason, the edit button is not visible so I cannot correct it. But thank you Michael for pointing out my typo. Just as well though, your umbrage has already been provoked.

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  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    I believe the spelling is "Toccata."

    Michael

  • Vebo
    replied
    A “pipe duster?” Love the term...

    How about Toccota from Suite Gothique (Boëllmann)

    Last edited by Vebo; 11-02-2019, 11:49 PM.

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  • AllenAnalog
    commented on 's reply
    Well that is certainly not the way I learned to play it. Even Virgil Fox did not do that much damage to the piece.

  • Vebo
    commented on 's reply
    Already posted here. But thanks for being sure we didn’t miss it. This kinda thing is part of what prompted my original post.

  • Don Furr
    replied
    For those who don't care for the T&F in DM.

    Click image for larger version

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  • Vebo
    commented on 's reply
    Michael, I didn’t notice it unit third time seeing it (rewatching ONLY to marvel at the console & facade - I swear the volume was off on my iPad). Look at around 0:30 the 2nd manual is clearly moving with the first, on it's own.

    And TBH, it prompted another question, why would anyone build a modern organ with manual/tracker action?

    Regarding where it is, the script should be a clue, and yes it looks Japanese to me, but it's all Greek to me. Lol!

  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    I think someone told him to take liberties with the piece–and he certainly did! I guess the notes, timing, and ornamentation in the written version were just suggestions.

    Yes, the Façade of that organ is truly unique.I would be very curious who the builder is. From the look of the drawknobs and console, it has the look of a mechanical console, but the other manuals (if coupled) are not moving as a mechanical action.

    Curious find. This performance makes me think I could certainly be a highly-paid concert artist!

    Michael

    P.S. After listening to the end, I think it's somewhere in Japan.

  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    Sad recording–on an organ which won't be heard live for years to some. It's nice to have this recording preserved, along with the videography. Thank you for sharing it.

    Michael

    P.S. I am curious what he's doing with his feet at 7:39. It looks like a trill, but it's not written in the original.

  • voet
    commented on 's reply
    You are right, Vebo. The organ is stunning. I wish the video identified it, because I would like to know more about it. Thank you for your post.

  • Vebo
    commented on 's reply
    But what about the look of that organ!?!? :O

  • voet
    replied
    I don't usually like to comment publically on the performances of others because there should be room for different interpretations. It also takes courage to give a public concert. However, this was a mess. One comment on Ton Koopman's performance that Vebo linked to says it better than I can:

    What a train wreck! Mistakes everywhere plus very questionable interpretation and ornamentation. So embarrassing.

    This is supposed to be music. If he slowed down a bit, perhaps he would not have made so many mistakes. I guess he gets paid whether or not it goes well.



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  • Don Furr
    replied
    Enjoy playing the piece but that's too fast for my taste.

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