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Tocatta in Fugue in D minor by J. S. Bach

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  • Larrytow
    commented on 's reply
    I have never heard it played that fast ! I'm worn out just listening to it. One of my organ teachers ( very early on ) told me " just because you can play something that fast, does NOT mean you should ". I don't think Anthony Newman even plays that fast, and he tends to quick tempos. Impressive technique for sure of course. That may well have been a recital encore, so some showing off can be excused.

    For the record, I am not a hater of the piece - many years ago I could even play the whole thing from memory.

  • Vebo
    replied
    I remember when I was young and CDs were the newest technology, I had a CD by Ton Koopman with T&F Dm on it, so I searched YouTube. I ran across this by Ton Koopman. Noteworthy not because of the performance, but what a wild looking console and façade! Give it a look, listen is optional. (The comments on the video suggest listening at your own peril)

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  • Vebo
    commented on 's reply
    I like that Peterborough, I like that one a lot! Very clean, and interesting cinematography! Thanks!

  • Admin
    commented on 's reply
    Embedded video
    https://organforum.com/forums/articl...-share-a-video

  • Vebo
    commented on 's reply
    Lieses, I didn’t mean anyone here was hateful, I'm sorry it came across that way - it's a just a common phrase. There is negativity out there for T&F in Dm, the fact a cartoon meme exists demonstrates that. But everyone here on this thread has been super nice, and I'm grateful for the discussion, and sharing of favorite pieces!

  • Peterboroughdiapason
    replied
    This performance by Oilvier Latry at Notre Dame is pretty spectacular.

    Not the way I normally like Bach played but this piece can take it. (Whoever wrote it.)
    Last edited by Admin; 11-01-2019, 06:52 AM. Reason: Embedded video

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  • Leisesturm
    commented on 's reply
    I see no hate for BWV 565 in this thread. We get that you think its the pinnacle of the Master's oeuvre. We don't all agree. Why can't we agree to disagree? Since you are the acknowledged authority on this why don't you share a few outstanding performances? I don't really need to hear yet another rendition but if you can make a good case for it I'm game. But I'll tell you now I'm not much for 'clean, spare, performances'. The T&F in Dm (Dorian) done at St. Mary's Redcliffe might give you an idea of where I'm coming from. Has the P&F in Eb ("St. Anne) entered the conversation?

  • Vebo
    replied
    Ok, haters gonna hate. I’m ok with that for bgw 565. But last chance tonight, do you have a fave performance of it? Ima promise to drop it, bcz apparently I'm not supposed to elevate the work.

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  • Admin
    commented on 's reply
    embedded video
    https://organforum.com/forums/articl...-share-a-video

  • Vebo
    commented on 's reply
    Ok, great talent gone horribly awry? I made myself listen to the the end. Talent there, but...awful interpretation. Awful!

  • Vebo
    replied
    Larry, yes me too. This is the stuff of why I am fighting the battle of 565 is a good piece, but many are making fodder to hate it!

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  • Larrytow
    commented on 's reply
    Well....If Cameron is going to be described as Virgil on steroids, all I can say is this rendition is a perfect example of what steroids do to ones mind !! For all of Virgil's bombast and showmanship, he was ALWAYS musical. I only made it to the end of the fanfare to determine this was going to be an absolute mess.

    And yes, that first one is a very good rendition. The player kinda takes the " stoic organist " expressions to an extreme. When I get into a piece and it is going well, I tend to show my enjoyment of the music. But we all have different styles.
    Last edited by Larrytow; 10-30-2019, 07:28 PM.

  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    Vebo,

    You now know how Cameron Carpenter is, and have heard his touring organ. IIRC, he is a graduate of Julliard, and is one of their more colorful organists. If you compare E. Power Biggs to Virgil Fox, Cameron Carpenter is Virgil Fox on steroids.

    Michael

  • Vebo
    replied
    So, this is (currently) my favorite performance of 565. I think it's clean and sharp. What do you think?

    I also like and amazed with this one:

    I also found a horrible vid of some character in a mohawk playing it what I consider badly (over-interpreted, for some reason feel like it's in some soviet bloc country)



    the console alone is frightening!

    I'm still avoiding sharing the video of a blue-70s-pantsuit wearing organist whose performance was cringe-worthy, but she was obviously proud of it. I loathe to make fun of people who are putting their heart into music.

    There are good performances of 565, and in your private, secret moments, I suspect most of you enjoyed it when well played.
    Last edited by Vebo; 10-30-2019, 07:03 PM. Reason: Grammar

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  • myorgan
    replied
    Originally posted by Leisesturm View Post
    I have a book of Virgil Fox recital pieces notated exactly as he plays them (no P&F in Cm). I was struck by the amount of super and sub coupling he found necessary even on very large organs.
    It has been discussed here many times regarding the pro's and con's of using sub- and super-couplers on an organ. On a pipe organ, it is relatively impossible to obtain proper scaling when using those couplers. I would imagine that's one of the draws of theatre organs and contributes to that particular sound quality.

    On the other hand, straight couplers ensure better scaling possibilities and an arguably more cohesive sound. So which sound is more "authentic" or "desirable?" I would imagine the debate will continue to rage for years.

    What I believe Virgil Fox did, was to not be scared of couplers. Arguably, audiences liked his performances because he explored the sonic possibilities of octave couplers, and provided a unique sound which differentiated him from other, more traditional organists of the time like E. Power Biggs. Performance-wise, it's a decision an organist needs to make–purist performances vs. a creative performance. What's the better balance?

    Michael
    Last edited by myorgan; 10-31-2019, 05:33 PM.

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