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  • Allen MOS organ home now and the adventure begins!

    John's home practice organ #14 is in place. Not my dream organ, but perhaps there is hope for it. This thing is pushing 50 years of age, so I guess the remarkable thing is that it still works at all. It has most of its original parts inside too. I see that the MOS board got factory exchanged sometime in the 90's, and the KBA board may not be original (it's actually the wrong dash number, so the sustain length is not adjustable). But the old workhorse T-50 amps are still going and sound good, though there's a tad too much hum. All the old cheapish paper cone speakers.

    Oddly enough, me and this old MOS happen to go WAY back. I serviced it over 35 years ago in its original home -- a small church near here. Then a few years later the church upgraded and I ran across this one in a private home. (I knew it was the same one because the church's name is carved into the wood on the inside and scratched into some of the metal components.)

    A few years later, the individual sold it to a different church, and I was called out to hook it up to some external speakers and check it out. Some years later the church decided to get rid of it and their organist at the same time, so they gave her the organ. She had never liked it much as she is a Gospel style player, and she eventually gave the organ to me in exchange for some repair work. It sat in my shop for four or five years, and we'd tried to sell it several times without success, even at very low prices. I guess it's just too plain for anybody.

    As MOS organs go, the 120-C was the lowest priced entry-level offering. So there's no card reader, no capture action (just three blind presets), no folding lid or rolltop cover, no lighted music rack, no external speakers, not even any relays. This is stripped down bare. Console is of course the "spaceship" look, and the bench even has those slanted sides! Quite a cool retro look, if you like that sort of thing!

    The 120 is the successor to the original System 100. As you may know, the original MOS organs that came out in 1971 all had gyro speakers, and even the lowly 100 had a little self-contained slow-turning (one speed only) gyro to give it some "motion" in the sound. After a year or two, Allen added the new "wind generator" board to the MOS system and deleted the gyros. Certain other incremental improvements to the original MOS system came at the same time, including an improved and adjustable Random Motion effect on another peripheral board. The preset system replaced the old mechanical relays carried over from analog days with a small circuit board, but they were still blind of course.

    This one being from that second generation, it has those upgrades, and it has the printed circuit "mother board" that Allen devised to link everything to the MOS board. (The earliest MOS organs out the door, of which I had one in stock a few years ago, had hand-wired point to point cabling to connect the system boards to the big MOS board.) But the key contacts are still wired by hand on this one, not on a PC board like later production.

    At that stage of MOS production, the internal speakers were still hold-overs from analog. The flute channel has a 15" Alnico magnet woofer fed through a 14 mH choke and shunted by a 60 mfd cap. Then it feeds a very plain 8" cone through a 30 mfd cap, no choke coil, and a stiff 3" paper tweeter through a 2.2 mfd cap, again no choke coil. The Main channel has two 8" speakers and a cone tweeter isolated by a 2.2 mfd cap. Thus, very low-tech speakers, but they do sound decent, if a little horny.

    So this is something of an old "dog" of an organ. Extremely primitive in comparison to all your ADC organs out there, and certainly a far cry from the R-230 I used to have, or even the MDS at church. This is rudimentary digital "synthesis" of course, quite different from the marvelous long-sample rendering we have become accustomed to in our modern organs.

    After I got it home today, I felt like I really couldn't have much fun without SOME kind of a celeste. So I opened it up and installed the famous "three diode" celeste system that I used to add regularly to MOS organs. I wired up an unused tab so it would simultaneously turn on three functions: (1) Swell to Great synthetic coupler, (2) Swell to Great natural coupler, and (3) Great tuning sharp. I labeled the tab "Swell Celeste on Great." Turning on any stop or combination on the swell division, then turning on this tab, the great manual then becomes a celeste version of the swell. The limitation to this scheme is that when it is engaged each great key played consumes two keying slots of the 12 available. With BOTH the natural and synthetic couplers engaged, playing a single great key is exactly the same as playing the same key simultaneously on both manuals. So five keys down at once and one pedal and you eat up 11 of the 12. If you're not careful, you may overplay and have a dead note. But at least you get a real celeste, and a rather fine one at that.

    Why did I bring something like this home? Well, it all happened so fast -- in a matter of a few days last fall we sold the excellent MDS-16 we'd just brought in, and then had an offer I couldn't refuse on my R-230. The Rodgers A677 came and went. There's not much left at the shop -- a couple of really big old MOS organs, a broken 3m Johannus, a Rodgers Cheetah with pink glue, an Allen ADC520 (not a bad organ, but requires two HC-15's at a minumum, and I don't have room). And that Viscount G404 whose mainboard is in Italy or somewhere. This one was the only choice at the moment.

    But I can turn it into a VPO without fear of messing up something valuable. I'll probably order the Harrison Labs MIDI adapter soon, then I can start experimenting with some VPO software, or at least add on the sounds of some of the MIDI modules I have lying around.

    So it's going to be a long-term project, unless someone comes along who really wants this thing as it is!
    John
    ----------
    *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

  • #2
    Aw, you're being way to harsh on that contemporary console. I rather like mine. And the fact that the back comes off with two screws is a plus. Good to hear that your movers did not have to cancel.
    Larry is my name; Allen is an organ brand. Allen RMWTHEA.3 with RMI Electra-Piano; Allen 423-C+Gyro; Britson Opus OEM38; Saville Series IV Opus 209; Steinway AR Duo-Art, Mills Violano Virtuoso with MIDI; Hammond 9812H with roll player; Gulbransen Rialto; Roland E-200; Mason&Hamlin AR Ampico piano, Allen ADC-5300-D with MIDI.

    Comment


    • #3
      I guess a guy could learn to love the looks of it! Sorta like 1970's Danish furniture... At least it's easy to dust.

      No matter how new and modern the sound, it seems every organ I try somehow fails to fully satisfy me. Even the glorious R-230 had certain failings. I was/am actually looking forward a bit to having this totally "minimalist" digital organ to play for a while. None of that vaunted subtle detuning among the stops to liven up the ensemble. None of that note by note voicing to drive you nuts. No, it just is what it is.

      But I will probably try juicing it up using stuff that I already have on hand. Today I may hook up my famous modified pipe speakers just to see if there is any more sparkle to be had. My past experience tells me that the internal speakers are not doing the organ justice.

      Another easy step would be to add on my Lexicon reverb and play it through the former "swell" speakers already installed in the organ nook. I've been wanting to find out how helpful it is to add a reverb system with its own speakers.

      And even more aggressive upgrade would be replacing the T-50 amps with a modern amp with tone controls or graphic EQ. My impression is that just a bit of EQ could make the sound more pleasant. One thing that holds me back from making any add-ons is the lack of space, but perhaps I'll de-clutter the organ nook a bit.

      That would just about wrap up all possible "Phase One" enhancements. After that, I would need to get that Harrison Labs MIDI adapter installed and start working toward a VPO setup.

      One thing I discovered yesterday is that I've already lost a good bit of finger dexterity just in the week or so I went without an organ at home, and also due to not having to prepare for church playing. I can't let this go on, need to get back to actually PLAYING the organ!
      John
      ----------
      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

      Comment


      • #4
        Wow, John. That was quite a history lesson of the development of Allen MOS organs. I am impressed.
        Bill

        My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
          One thing I discovered yesterday is that I've already lost a good bit of finger dexterity just in the week or so I went without an organ at home, and also due to not having to prepare for church playing. I can't let this go on, need to get back to actually PLAYING the organ!
          John,

          You and me both!!! I just hooked up the organ in the garage now that it's in the mid-40s. I'm not liking that sound, but you've given me ideas.

          Best of luck with your "new" contemporary-console organ with "no frills." I just know it'll float your boat–keeping that alive and making the most of its sound.

          Michael
          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
          • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

          Comment


          • #6
            This morning I've played it quite a bit, which was very good for my fingers! I'm noticing that the key tension is quite low compared to my R-230 and the MDS45 at church. I will need to try adjusting the tension springs at some point. The keys go down with so little effort I am playing all kinds of accidental wrong notes and it makes me sound even worse than usual! I may also decide to adjust the "make" point of the contacts just a tad. It seems that at least some of the keys are firing a bit too quickly, though that could be a side effect of the weak tension on the springs.

            I think I may need to replace the filter caps in the old T-50 amps right away. Either than or just ditch them and substitute some kind of modern amps. They have too much hum and it's starting to get on my nerves. There also is a weird squeal in one of them for just a fraction of a second when I turn the organ on. That could be the death rattle, as I sure don't want to get into replacing transistors and such. If replacing all the electrolytics doesn't cure it, I'll probably toss them.

            One other observation -- registration on these old organs requires some re-thinking. On a pipe organ or the typical digital, you might want a plenum registration to contain both your principals and flutes 8-4-2 and the mixture, possibly your quint. Then you'd probably want about the same registration on your swell and couple it to the great. That's the type of formula I normally use for my full without reeds.

            But on this old MOS, the more stops you turn on, the less distinctive they get. That isn't a surprise, given that the tone generators simply stack the "recipes" for all the stops drawn and add them mathematically, sweeping through the resulting "sum" at the required rate to produce the notes you play. The more colors you add together, the closer the output gets to "brown." I'm finding that a very simple selection, such as Pr8 + Oct4 + MixtIV gives a nice full organ tone. And coupling the swell to the great doesn't do much good, as it doesn't bring in any additional amps or speakers. Thus you have the luxury of using the swell as a totally independent division if needed.

            I just now worked out a way to have a decent Faux Festival Trumpet. With my above-described plenum on the great, I drew all the 8' stops on the swell plus the two mutations. The reedy tone of the Trompette clearly dominates, and the resulting sound is reminiscent of a big reed. And loud enough to solo out the melody against the great "plenum." At least it seems that way right now.

            We all know that you have to adjust your registrations and your playing style any time you play a different organ. So I'll keep experimenting here and having a little quarantine fun!
            John
            ----------
            *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

            https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
              It seems that at least some of the keys are firing a bit too quickly, though that could be a side effect of the weak tension on the springs.
              John,

              I'd adjust the touch first, as that will likely fix most of the issues. Only then would I go after the activation point. I've always disliked the older Allen keyboards because the touch was so soft. On the other hand, it makes it more necessary to have accurate manual skills. So, it's a toss-up. Personally, I like a tougher action that is more like a pipe organ.

              Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
              One other observation -- registration on these old organs requires some re-thinking. On a pipe organ or the typical digital, you might want a plenum registration to contain both your principals and flutes 8-4-2 and the mixture, possibly your quint. Then you'd probably want about the same registration on your swell and couple it to the great. That's the type of formula I normally use for my full without reeds.
              My, how soon we forget! As we all know, MOS organs had this interesting feature they introduced when we engage too many stops–distortion! Personally, I leave out any mutations when using the mixture because sometimes the pitches will clash, especially if you don't know which pitches the mixture is using.

              I'm loving your discoveries as you re-explore this older organ. If you replace the caps on the amplifiers, could you do the rest of us a favor? Please make a recording of the BEFORE and AFTER re-capping. Curious minds, you know.

              Thanks for starting this thread and keeping us posted on your endeavors!

              Michael
              Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
              • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
              • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
              • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

              Comment


              • jbird604
                jbird604 commented
                Editing a comment
                I will be sure to record the amps before and after, if I decide to even fix them. My concern is that there may be more things wrong with them than just the caps. The output transistors are no longer available, best I know. Also, I'm leaning toward setting up an amp on a stand beside the bench so I can make tonal adjustments without having to turn the living room upside down, and I can experiment with adding reverb and more speakers and stuff.

            • #8
              Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
              The keys go down with so little effort I am playing all kinds of accidental wrong notes and it makes me sound even worse than usual!
              I used to play a 1929 E. M. Skinner that had very little resistance when you depressed a key. I was more accustomed to playing a tracker or my piano, so it really was challenging. Often during a service when I was changing registration or putting a different piece of music on the music rack if I lightly brushed a key it would sound.

              Bill

              My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

              Comment


              • jbird604
                jbird604 commented
                Editing a comment
                I do believe that a stiffer action is beneficial. Not only keeps those mishaps away, but probably strengthens the fingers effectively. I'm not sure how much tension I can add, but it's worth a try.

            • #9
              Woof woof. Lipstick on a pig. Can't make a silk purse from a sow's ear... Old John checking in to report on life with a very plain old MOS organ.

              At least I can take comfort in knowing that once I start gutting this thing to make a VPO -- I'm not doing away with some wonderful instrument that just needed some TLC. But I have gotten in several good hours of practice, and my fingers are starting to loosen up again. It's certainly not the worst thing that a person could be forced to practice on. It just doesn't have that sizzle....

              TBH, I knew not to expect much from the bottom of the line MOS-1 single computer model. It just is what it is. And what MOS is, is rudimentary synthesis of basic harmonic structure only. And all the stops come out of the same knothole (or the same two) at the same pitch, with the same attack. Playing one of these will give you a new appreciation for the refinements we may take for granted in modern organs.

              Anyway -- It probably sounds best simply playing through the internal speakers using the old T-50 amps. I haven't yet added on my pipe speakers, and that could yield a little prettier sound, at least more clarity that you get from the old cheap paper cone tweeters. Today I've got it hooked up to a modern mixer with bass-mid-treble controls on each channel, and all the other typical mixer features, and a simple effects engine. And I've routed it into a very good modern amplifier and the good quality Makin organ speakers I have been using with my other organs. It's perhaps marginally better, but still nothing to write home about. Not enough improvement over the internal audio to justify having the extra stuff hanging off it.

              At this point I should rebuild the T-50 amps (new electrolytic caps to get rid of the hum), then add the pipe speakers to the console speakers to get a little more crispness out of it. Then I'll use a resistor network to derive a mono signal from the dual T-50 outputs and feed that into the Lexicon and the Makin speakers. That will likely get me everything that can be gotten out of this old dog and sustain me until I can get on with the project.

              A VPO was where I was headed even before I sold my R-230. As good as it was, I was not quite satisfied, nor did I find great satisfaction in the slightly newer Rodgers A677. I think the VPO is what I'm really needing and wanting.

              Yet I feel a bit sentimental about old organs and the technology that made it possible for us to enjoy amazingly pipe-like sound with minimal fuss. I just don't know if there is anything out there that would satisfy me that I can be sure nobody is going to buy out from under me!
              John
              ----------
              *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

              https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

              Comment


              • #10
                John, you probably know this in your heart already, but I think you may never be Completely pleased with Any organ you have at home ! LOL My thought is that when you build a VPO, you really should start with a three manual console. You Know you will want that eventually, don't ya ?
                Regards, Larry

                At Home : Yamaha Electones : EX-42 ( X 3 !!! ), E-5AR, FX-1 ( X 2 !! ), FX-20, EL-25 ( X 2, 1 chopped, 1 not ). Allen 601D, ADC 6000D. Baldwin 626. Lowrey CH32-1. At Churches I play for : Allen Q325 ( with Vista ), Allen L123 ( with Navigator ). Rodgers 755.

                Comment


                • jbird604
                  jbird604 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Probably will. I actually have a spare two-manual Allen stack, so I could quite easily make this one 3 (or 4) manuals. The top lid and stop rail have to go anyway when I convert it. I can start out with this console pretty easily, as all I need is the Harrison Labs converter to MIDI up all three divisions.

                  But you're probably right that I'll never be satisfied. I have some hope that the Viscount G404 may be very sweet, if/when the main board ever comes back from Italy. If I like the sounds as much as I loved my little G401 a few years ago, it might please me more than anything else I've tried. It has MIDI built in, so it would be a perfect base for a VPO. And the console is very compact, 3 or 4 inches shallower even than this baby Allen.

                  Right now I've got nothing but TIME on my hands! Who knows what I may decide to do before this crazy lockdown is over?

                • tbeck
                  tbeck commented
                  Editing a comment
                  John, the beauty of having a VPO is that you can play and tweak many different instruments and styles to your heart's content.

              • #11
                I'm puzzled that you haven't hooked up the Lexicon yet.
                Larry is my name; Allen is an organ brand. Allen RMWTHEA.3 with RMI Electra-Piano; Allen 423-C+Gyro; Britson Opus OEM38; Saville Series IV Opus 209; Steinway AR Duo-Art, Mills Violano Virtuoso with MIDI; Hammond 9812H with roll player; Gulbransen Rialto; Roland E-200; Mason&Hamlin AR Ampico piano, Allen ADC-5300-D with MIDI.

                Comment


                • jbird604
                  jbird604 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Primarily just a matter of doing it now, and I really should give it a try before I dismiss the idea. The cramped space I have in the organ nook is always a pain in the bench-pad, and never so much as when I want to try out external equipment on an organ! Today I opened the console and unplugged the hummy T-50 amps, added a "Y" cable to each channel's actual signal cable (so the T-50's input jacks can serve to combine the expression and muting as they should). Then I ran the RCA cords out the back and into my mixer. I was delighted that expression and muting were properly preserved with this arrangement.

                  So now I have the two channels available for experimenting without having to open the console again. Maybe tomorrow I'll try using the Lexicon in place of the primitive effects engine on the mixer. That will help me know if it's got the stuff I'm looking for.

                  As I said above, my next phase is to repair the T-50 amps and re-instate the internal audio, and use the stack of speakers behind me for a reverb setup.

                • AllenAnalog
                  AllenAnalog commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Let us know what caps you end up buying for those T-50s (source and part number). I have multiple T-50s that are humming to various degrees (Does that mean they have dementia and forgot the words?) and eventually need to do something about that.

              • #12
                Lexicon -- Yes, I like it! Not sure why I sort of dismissed it back when I bought it. But it is vastly better than the little built-in effects engine in the mixer. And bound to get better as I have time to play with all the options.

                Here's the current setup: I'm picking up the two channels of MOS audio using a Y cable on each T-50 amp. The expression and muting get properly joined to the audio signal right at the input jacks, as they must to preserve these functions. From the Y, I take off with a shielded stereo RCA cable to the mixer. The little mixer has plenty of gain to handle the low level of the DAC signal. And the impedance is evidently high enough not to interfere with the operation of the expression cells. All good!

                The mixer outputs feed a stereo amp and the amp outputs go to the speakers on the back wall of my nook. Each channel has a 10" woofer in a sealed box, crossed over to two 6" mids and one dome tweeter in each one. Speakers face up at the ceiling. Not the greatest speakers, but they have to do for now.

                The MOS audio seems to sound best with the bass cut just a tad. Not because the 10" woofers are big on bass, but it just seems muddy until I trim back the bass on the mixer EQ. A tiny bit of treble cut is also in order on the Main channel, as the mixtures are a little screechy.

                I have the Lexicon set for "series" operation (routing scheme #2). The signals first go through processor #1, which is set to apply a subtle bit of pitch shift. Can't set the "mix" knob very high, as I don't want a continuous celeste. Just a subtle fattening of the sound, sort of like a double-computer MOS organ.

                Processor #2 is set for Large Hall reverb, and I'm tinkering with the knobs to try out different amounts of pre-delay, decay time, and liveness, as well as the wet/dry mix. I'm sure we'd all have different preferences as to how much artificial reverb we like. Some wouldn't want any, but I like some of it. I like to imagine that I'm playing in a big English stone church!

                Maybe I'll get a chance to record it later, once the noise dies down in the neighborhood. It's a beautiful sunny spring day, and the neighbors are out in force with their mowers and leaf blowers.
                John
                ----------
                *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                Comment


                • #13
                  Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
                  The MOS audio seems to sound best with the bass cut just a tad. Not because the 10" woofers are big on bass, but it just seems muddy until I trim back the bass on the mixer EQ. A tiny bit of treble cut is also in order on the Main channel, as the mixtures are a little screechy.
                  John,

                  How much of that do you believe is related to the caps on the amplifiers? Also, did that generation MOS have the Mellow/Bright dial for the organ? I would think that could help some with VERY basic equalization.

                  Michael
                  Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                  • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                  • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                  • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

                  Comment


                  • jbird604
                    jbird604 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Hard to know at this point. It just seems that both channels are rather muddy and boomy until I turn down the bass on the mixer. Could be that these external speakers I'm using are heavy in the bass end.

                    The irregularities in note to note and octave to octave level has me feeling more appreciative of the extensive voicing controls on that Rodgers I just sold! As I'm playing this MOS I keep thinking to myself -- "I need to go into voicing mode and soften that one note..." Then I remember that you can't do that!

                    Yes, this organ has the knob on the front that says Mellow and Bright. It does seem to regulate the brilliance of the highest pitches to some extent, but of course I can make much more drastic changes with the EQ controls on the mixer.

                    It could even be that my little organ nook has some resonances that cause it to favor certain notes.

                  • Larrytow
                    Larrytow commented
                    Editing a comment
                    While mixers are not supposed to have their own "sound", it seems that various ones sometimes do. That enhanced bass may be a quality of the mixer you are using ? And the mixture being bright is how I recall most MOS 1 instruments sounding. Their version of the principal family of stops in that era seemed to be more Schlicker than A/S.

                • #14
                  Here's a bit of video showing the organ, with a brief sample of the sound with and without the Lexicon, and with the "Celeste Effect" that I added.

                  John
                  ----------
                  *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                  Comment


                  • myorgan
                    myorgan commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Great job, John! I don't know why you're always putting down your playing.

                    It was a very informative video from the listener's perspective. Now, how about inside the back of the organ?<evil grin> You're hiding so much talent. Thank you.

                    Michael

                  • jbird604
                    jbird604 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    You are very kind, Michael! I do plan to show something of the insides in the thread I just started about MOS "hacks." Stay tuned!

                • #15
                  Thanks for posting this. I think your Lexicon setup parameters sound better than my single-pass Nanoverb. The celeste actually sounds quite nice - very different from what we expect from MOS-1 organs without a celeste generator. Have you ever published details of that hack? Perhaps this would be a good time for you to start a MOS-1 hack thread, including bringing out the elusive 32' stop from hiding.
                  Larry is my name; Allen is an organ brand. Allen RMWTHEA.3 with RMI Electra-Piano; Allen 423-C+Gyro; Britson Opus OEM38; Saville Series IV Opus 209; Steinway AR Duo-Art, Mills Violano Virtuoso with MIDI; Hammond 9812H with roll player; Gulbransen Rialto; Roland E-200; Mason&Hamlin AR Ampico piano, Allen ADC-5300-D with MIDI.

                  Comment


                  • jbird604
                    jbird604 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Good idea, Larry. I think I will do that. Someone else may know other MOS hacks to post.

                  • jbird604
                    jbird604 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I keep tweaking the Lexicon, and discovering more realistic sounds from it. It does seem that the Large Hall and the Arena -- in "series" mode -- make a good starting point for a "cathedral" sound. As it get better at it, I'll post some numbers from the settings.
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