Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Best organists

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Best organists

    Who do you rate as the best organists mostly for home and theatre

    Phil Kelsall blew me away

    How do you get to a pro level...it seems after the basic tutors there is no progression route,unlike classical repertoire

    Thanks

  • #2
    You will need a proper teacher, probably through video lessons in this pandemic. Andy Gilbert who frequents this forum does video lessons on home organs, and is based in the UK like you. I would expect him to chime in!

    Current: Allen 225 RTC, W. Bell reed organ, Lowrey TGS, Singer upright grand
    Former: Yamaha E3R
    https://www.exercisesincatholicmythology.com

    Comment


    • #3
      There are many great theatre organists that I admire today. Simon Gledhill and Richard Hills would top my list of UK theatre organists. David Gray would also be on that list, but last I heard he was concentrating on musical endeavors that did not include theatre organ.
      -Admin

      Allen 965
      Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
      Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
      Hauptwerk 4.2

      Comment


      • #4
        'Best' is always going to be subjective, that topic has come up a few times before, with all sorts of names offered.

        I'd also put Richard Hills and Simon Gledhill up there as probably my top two currently active UK theatre organists. It also depends on what you think of as 'theatre organ'. If it's 'Blackpool', then Phil Kelsall, Nicholas Martin and Robert Wolfe are going to be high on your list.

        As Larason2 kindly pointed out, I give organ tuition, including theatre style, via Zoom. You're quite right, after things like Complete Organ Player, there is no prescribed 'route'. I assume that you read bass clef for pedals and left hand. If not, that's the first thing I teach! Once a student is proficient at that, we can move on to material in books like the excellent 'Gentle Touch' series, and then look at the art or arranging for theatre style. That's where the real challenge, and most of the fun, lies!
        It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

        New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

        Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
        Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
        Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
        Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

        Comment


        • #5
          Speaking of David Gray, this popped up on my FB feed today
          -Admin

          Allen 965
          Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
          Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
          Hauptwerk 4.2

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Larason2 View Post
            You will need a proper teacher, probably through video lessons in this pandemic. Andy Gilbert who frequents this forum does video lessons on home organs, and is based in the UK like you. I would expect him to chime in!
            Larason2, I want to say Andy is the best! I take organ lessons from him, through Zoom, and have now about eight months. I have learned a great deal from him and a "true teacher'! You won't be disappointed.

            Terry

            Comment


            • #7
              I admit to not being the aficionado of organ music, and particularly the players. The best I've heard live was a woman who played the outdoor organ in Balboa Park, San Diego, back in 2008 or so. Pretty cool organ.

              The ones I've seen play were on a TV documentary that featured 5-6 players who competed worldwide. Some of those guys were amazing.

              The only person I could NAME, with us being former Las Vegas residents, would be who they referred to as the Liberace of organ music, Virgil Fox. As it turned out we ended up with the entire estate of a long time Las Vegas organ tech, Richard Wallace, which included massive amounts of every type of organ equipment, more pipe-related than not. I'd never heard of Virgil Fox, but a friend of Wallace dropped by to give us some history on Wallace and his estate.

              In the garage was an old Victorian console and lead-piping from the console, and we were told that Richard had gotten that directly out of Virgil Fox's estate after he'd passed! I still have parts of that console and may pass those on to Matt Neill out of Oregon since he expressed quite a bit of interest once I'd told him about it.

              How did Virgil Fox compare to some of the others listed above?

              Comment


              • Admin
                Admin
                Administrator
                Admin commented
                Editing a comment
                There is no comparison. Virgil Fox was primarily a classical organist while the ones mentioned in this thread are known best as theatre organists. Fox's immense talent, romantic approach to repertoire, rapport with his audience, and flamboyance earned him a cult following that persists over 40 years after his death in 1980.
            Working...
            X