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Is this our stefanussen?

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  • #16
    Re: Is this our stefanussen?

    [quote user="radagast"][quote user="davidecasteel"]


    (You do mean "it's I" don't you?) []</P>


    David</P>


    [/quote]</P>


    Isn't "I" supposed to be used when it is the subject, not the object, of a sentence? If so, then "me" is correct.</P>


    [/quote]</P>


    The verb "to be" of which "is" is a form, is a copula verb and thus does not take an object but rather a subjective completion. Therefore, the subjective form "I" rather than the objective form "me"is correct.</P>


    How's that for pomposity! (but it's also true). </P>


    Rob</P>

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    • #17
      Re: Is this our stefanussen?

      [quote user="radagast"][quote user="davidecasteel"]


      Well, I listened to about a half dozen renditions and yours was by far the best! I thoroughly enjoyed it. Our organist plays it quite well, too. It's one of my favorites. I also listened to your "Now Thank We All Our God" and it was great!</P>


      (You do mean "it's I" don't you?) []</P>


      David</P>


      [/quote]</P>


      Isn't "I" supposed to be used when it is the subject, not the object, of a sentence? If so, then "me" is correct.</P>


      [/quote]</P>


      "Is" is a linking verb and cannot take an object. In this case, "I" is what is called a predicate nominative. I was slightly mistaken in my original question--I should have referenced "That's I" instead of "It's I", but the principle is the same in both cases since the implied verb (by the "'s") is the word "is". By the same reasoning, when folks say "That's them" they really should say "Those are they".</P>


      I wasn't trying to be critical, and really intended only to pull his chain a little. But since you responded I thought I'd better give a fuller explanation. Although I have 2 engineering degrees, I did consider becoming an English teacher when I graduated from college.</P>


      Just to throw out something else that often is misunderstood, the proper use of the word "ain't" is almost unknown. (Yes, there is a "proper" use of the word.) "Ain't" is actually the contraction for "am not" and so it is grammatical (though colloquial) to say "I ain't"; however, it is inappropriate with any subject other than "I".</P>


      David</P>

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