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A report on the "Pipedreams Live" Concert

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  • A report on the "Pipedreams Live" Concert


  • #2
    Re: A report on the "Pipedreams Live" Concert



    I haven't heard Fa-Si, and from what you've described, probably wouldn't want to. I think there is a lot of c20th and now c21st music that 'new' audiences would enjoy, in the same way that they might enjoy your suggested introduction to the paintings of the masters. However, I've had to 'endure' concerts of the 'art' you describe and, yes, I wouldn't know if they'd played one wrong note or a hundred. I agree witrh your comments about the talent of the performers and the work taken etc etc, but this type of music just turns me off completely. Personal taste, of course, and some might say that I'm being narrow-minded, but I actually enjoy a bit of techno, prog rock and even a little rap, (if it's done really well and not just to shock).</p>

    Chacun a son gout, as they say.</p>

    Andy</p>

    PS: Are you really an 'offest' lithographer, or have you inadvertantly offset your offset!
    </p>
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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    • #3
      Re: A report on the &quot;Pipedreams Live&quot; Concert



      Andy,</P>


      Great insights from both you and HL about the post-modern stuff. Perhaps your signature line: "It's not what you play, it's not how you play. . . . " should be modified in light of this!</P>


      Seriously, what are these guys thinking? Has the concert-going public become that inane?</P>


      That's not to sayone must always present a straight-laced all-classical note-for-note program. Certainly improvisation and innovative use of the instrument are entertaining when done by a real artist (such as Cameron Carpenter, for example, in some of his controversial but still artful programs).</P>


      Anyway, thanks HL for the interesting report. I'm sure the program was a real "trip" (to use a 1960's expression).</P>


      John</P>
      <P mce_keep="true"></P>
      John
      ----------
      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

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      • #4
        Re: A report on the &quot;Pipedreams Live&quot; Concert

        I will try to write a summary of the excellent Christ Church concert later today. There was a lot of 20th century music, but nothing quite as awful as Fa-Si.

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        • #5
          Re: A report on the &quot;Pipedreams Live&quot; Concert

          [quote user="jbird604"]


          Andy, Perhaps your signature line: "It's not what you play, it's not how you play. . . . " should be modified in light of this!</p>

          [/quote]</p>

          I think I'm as broad minded as they come, John. I have to be when I have music tech students blasting out techno (very musical techno after my tuition[]) and others working on baroque and eveything in between. However, there are limits, John, there are limits![]</p>

          One of my colleagues gave an amusing presentation at a prize-giving concert, where he wrapped up a piece in several different styles. At one point he started hitting the keys randomly with those 'concrete hands' and aked what style it was now in. 'Rubbish' was one of the more printable replies. 'True, was his response, but you'd get an Arts Council grant for it!'</p>

          Andy
          </p>
          It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

          New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

          Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
          Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
          Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
          Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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          • #6
            Re: A report on the &quot;Pipedreams Live&quot; Concert



            At a recital on our Klais in 2007 one of the organists played a modern piece that was 10 minutes of holding some strange chords interminably, every once in a while changing one single note to form a slightly different strange chord. I don't remember the name of the piece or the composer (it was that unmemorable). I found it most underwhelming (as did most of the audience, from what I could tell).</P>


            David</P>

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            • #7
              Re: A report on the &quot;Pipedreams Live&quot; Concert

              I once attended a master class lead by a well known organist. He wanted us to work on an unmusical work, the name of which escapes me, that was highly dissonant. He was offended when all of us refused to work on it. We were told that we needed to learn a wide variety of genres, blah, blah, blah. I do play dissonant works, but the dissonance needs to be an integral part of the piece. It should not be used just for shock value or to prove that an organist has the skills to perform technically challenging "music."

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              • #8
                Re: A report on the &quot;Pipedreams Live&quot; Concert

                [quote user="andyg"]


                PS: Are you really an 'offest' lithographer, or have you inadvertantly offset your offset!
                </P>


                [/quote]</P>
                <P mce_keep="true"></P>


                LOL it took weeks for anyone to notice that, thanks I will fix that! </P>

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                • #9

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                  • #10
                    Re: A report on the &quot;Pipedreams Live&quot; Concert



                    Re: modern music on organ programs: so much negativity here!</P>


                    If concerts are solely for the purpose ofhearingthemost popular organ pieces, we'd end up hearing the same cookie-cutterprogram played over and over ad naseum.</P>


                    Concerts designed so as to offend the least number of people would be very bland indeed.</P>


                    (The late) Luciano Berio is an extremely well-known award-winning composer. Even thoughthese compositionsmay not be everyone's cup of tea, I think there is something to be said for eclectic programming.</P>


                    If nothing else, broadening our horizons can make us appreciate our favorite music even more.</P>

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                    • #11
                      Re: A report on the &quot;Pipedreams Live&quot; Concert



                      SB32,
                      </p>

                      My teacher shared his modern music epiphany with me a few weeks ago. He used to totally abhor all modern organ music, but then he found that he really enjoyed it if he listened for shapes and colors and gestures in the music, instead of seeking out 3rds, 5ths, triads, and other "nice" sounds. I am trying to take his advice to heart and I think I am starting to like newer music more now.
                      </p>

                      Did anyone get to go to the concert at the Auditorium on Sunday?</p>

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                      • #12

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                        • #13
                          Re: A report on the &quot;Pipedreams Live&quot; Concert



                          [quote user="Philip the organist"]My teacher shared his modern music epiphany with me a few weeks ago. He used to totally abhor all modern organ music, but then he found that he really enjoyed it if he listened for shapes and colors and gestures in the music, instead of seeking out 3rds, 5ths, triads, and other "nice" sounds. I am trying to take his advice to heart and I think I am starting to like newer music more now.[/quote]I'm glad to hear that!</P>


                          Philip, would you consider taking out that link in the middle of your post? I'm referring to the 'lo-res scan of the program'. It does not display properly (at least on my system) and its association to a Gmail page causes a "you are about to view pages over a secure connection" warning to pop up.</P>


                          [quote user="Pipedreamer"]I believe that the first few composers I can link to this decline are those involved in the development of 12-tone and Igor Stravisnky. This began a decline in western art music and the rise of other genres. Instead of going with the audience tastes, like they had in the past, 'serious art' composers seem to have stoppd writing for mass appeal; they are once again writing for specific events and purely from inspiration. I do not think this is a good thing anymore; we have broken so many barriers since the last time this occured that there really are none left worth breaking. Are the masses going to care about a composer who is breaking ground by using 128th notes in an electronic tape recording over office sounds? Probably not. Yet we still try; while someone might pay once or twice to listen to a new and 'innovative' piece, is that really all it has to offer? Will the audience return to it if all it can offer is that it breaks down more barriers? Most 20th century composers, with the notable exception of Messiaen, seem to have abandoned the melody in favor of rhythmic pulse and motive-based forms in favor of artistic freedom. I single out Messiaen because he, to my ears, composes some of the most melodious and beautiful of all of our repertoire. I can only hope that more composers with his gift for melody follow his example and write for the organ. I think that melody and harmony are the way forward at this point; the audience needs something sweet to carress their ears, not more bitterness.[/quote]I don't really believe Stravinsky can be tied to the 'decline of western music'! [] The Rite of Spring remains one of the most powerful works of the last century. To experience something like this or Petrouchka performed livecan beamoving experience.</P>


                          I appreciate melody and harmony, but I stronglybelieve they are not the only means to musical expression.</P>


                          the audience needs something sweet to carress their ears, not more bitterness.
                          Does not death give more meaning to life? Doesn't sorrow give one a greater emotional breadth andthus the capacity to experience joy more fully? Music, being a reflection of life, mustencapsulate the vastness of human experience. Without the totality of emotions, music becomes nothing more than a panacea.</P>

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                          • #14

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                            • #15

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