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Photos of the organ(s) you play...with a twist

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  • Photos of the organ(s) you play...with a twist

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  • #2
    If anyone would like to visit my church and treat our console thus, I will volunteer to play for your funeral gratis. SIGH!

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    • #3
      I spent 30 years in law enforcement and that organ is the closest representation I have seen of the inside of a patrol car. The only thing that seems to be missing is the spittoon unless that's what the Dunkin Donuts cup is for. Pretty shabby treatment for a magnificent old instrument.
      "The employment of the piano is forbidden in church, as is also that of noisy frivolous instruments such as drums, cymbals, bells and the like." St. Pius X

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      • #4
        That photo was taken a few years ago. The console and the area around it has actually been cleaned up for the most part, as you can sort of see in the attached photo, although it's kind of hard to tell at the angle the photo was taken. The Dunkin Donuts cup was there courtesy of a substitute organist who's a few years younger than I am (I'm 24), who is one of those people who makes a daily "D&D" run and always has to buy the biggest size available. I guess one advantage of a cup that large is that you can avoid urgent trips to the bathroom during the homily after consuming 32 ounces of coffee I can understand needing a dose of caffeine when playing for an early Mass, but there's a reason the console's not equipped with cup-holders! That's just one of the basics of console etiquette right up there with no street shoes and playing with clean hands...no food or drink anywhere near the organ!

        But, unfortunately, a cluttered console is the least of this organ's problems. The church has a leaky roof, which means water has gotten into the chambers over the years. There's always plaster raining down from the chambers onto the floor and stairs leading up to the choir loft. And the organist informed me that randomly chiffy-sounding notes in the 16' Bourdon is due to some of the pipes being full of plaster! The church is trying to raise money to have the organ refurbished, repairing the damage and possibly even adding new stuff, like some sorely-needed solo reeds (possibly even some horizontal ones!).
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        • #5
          The church is trying to raise money to have the organ refurbished, repairing the damage and possibly even adding new stuff, like some sorely-needed solo reeds (possibly even some horizontal ones!).
          The church should get the roof repaired before even thinking of adding to this organ! What is the use to put up new pipes below a ceiling that is coming down? That cup is the least of your worries.

          Pretty shabby treatment for a magnificent old instrument.
          Old?

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          • #6
            I would hope that they would get the roof fixed first! No use in spending thousands on adding to the organ when everything will just get flooded and covered in plaster. But I'm pretty sure that fixing the leaky roof will take first priority. Then the work on the organ can commence. And our organ is not that old, at least as organs go. The church was completed in 1928, and the organ is original to the building. According to the nameplate, the console was replaced in 1970, and it was most recently repaired last week, including fixing some intermittently functioning stoptabs and returning functionality to the crescendo pedal.

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            • #7
              An update: the leaky roof has been replaced, all the damage to the organ chambers fixed, and a restoration of the organ is almost completed! We're just waiting on the refurbishment of a few ranks and then it'll be done! Unfortunately though, our organist has been out sick for a few weeks, and we've had a string of substitutes: the above-mentioned caffeine freak; a pianist who plays the whole mass using the regular organist's General 1 piston (softest setting) because she doesn't want people hearing her mistakes; and a very talented colleague of mine from the AGO chapter in town, who discovered the keys on the Great smeared with hand lotion when sitting down to play this past Sunday (most likely courtesy of one of the other two). Despite knowing I play, the music director (not an organist herself) hasn't asked me to sub. However I do sub regularly at the church affiliated with the school where I teach, which has an 1890 III/23 Ryder tracker in fairly decent shape.

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              • #8
                Someone in authority needs to have some very severe words with those who trash the instrument. That organ is a very expensive asset of the church and must be respected and protected! And anyone who sees cups, etc. sitting on any part of it should immediately remove same and sternly chastise the culprit who put them there! (And the same goes for pianos!)

                People will not learn if no one teaches them. If the parents have failed to do so, then others must step in.

                David

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by davidecasteel View Post
                  Someone in authority needs to have some very severe words with those who trash the instrument. That organ is a very expensive asset of the church and must be respected and protected! And anyone who sees cups, etc. sitting on any part of it should immediately remove same and sternly chastise the culprit who put them there! (And the same goes for pianos!)

                  People will not learn if no one teaches them. If the parents have failed to do so, then others must step in.

                  David
                  Damn straight.

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                  • #10
                    We used to service a 4 manual Reuter here in Dallas,Tx.
                    We got a call that some of the pistons drew the same combinations. The console is extra wide having side cabinets on the treble side to store music in and so forth.
                    We removed the top and back and found that someone has left a cup of coffee in the cabinet.Someone had put some music in that shelf and had thereby spilled the coffee on the junction for the pistons thus shorting many together.
                    I cleaned it up and all was fine.

                    The organ has a playback unit on it. We went out to lunch and I came back early. There was a performance of the Widor on it and I played it as the others returned , then as they came up the chancel stairs I got up from the console as the organ was tootling away on the Widor.
                    We all had a good laugh. One could vary the tempo of the playback so it could go very fast if one wanted.

                    Cheers,

                    Jerry F Bacon-Dallas,Tx
                    Jerry F Bacon-Dallas,Tx

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                    • #11
                      I read an article on Facebook from a Hammond organ related group I am a part of where the administrator went down to the church the next day or so to find the Leslie spinning away on fast tremolo speed. He left a note to remind those to treat the oragn with respect,...especially if you do NOT own the organ,...to turn the organ OFF after church service and close the lid covering the manuals. He also did not like the idea of the ladies of the church to sit Christmas decorations on top of the Leslie,and let them know of his dismay over that as you don't want the top of the Leslie scratched up from stuff sitting up there. In other words,...treat the organ with respect. BUT,...this should go with ANY organ in a church,...not just a Hammond organ with a Leslie. That organ is a HUGE investment and it deserves to be treated respectfully.
                      Late 1980's Rodgers Essex 640

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                      • #12
                        Nitsua, this is a great idea - something only a church organist would appreciate and have a good laugh over. I look forward to seeing more pics.

                        Unfortunately, I don't have any pics to show, but I will admit that the console of the organ at the church where I currently play is cluttered with paper clips, pencils, and old bulletins from previous services. I put up with it for a while and then finally PURGE. I never set any food or drink anywhere near the organ, though.

                        - - - Updated - - -

                        Originally posted by Nitsua337 View Post
                        That photo was taken a few years ago. The console and the area around it has actually been cleaned up for the most part, as you can sort of see in the attached photo, although it's kind of hard to tell at the angle the photo was taken. The Dunkin Donuts cup was there courtesy of a substitute organist who's a few years younger than I am (I'm 24), who is one of those people who makes a daily "D&D" run and always has to buy the biggest size available. I guess one advantage of a cup that large is that you can avoid urgent trips to the bathroom during the homily after consuming 32 ounces of coffee I can understand needing a dose of caffeine when playing for an early Mass, but there's a reason the console's not equipped with cup-holders! That's just one of the basics of console etiquette right up there with no street shoes and playing with clean hands...no food or drink anywhere near the organ!

                        But, unfortunately, a cluttered console is the least of this organ's problems. The church has a leaky roof, which means water has gotten into the chambers over the years. There's always plaster raining down from the chambers onto the floor and stairs leading up to the choir loft. And the organist informed me that randomly chiffy-sounding notes in the 16' Bourdon is due to some of the pipes being full of plaster! The church is trying to raise money to have the organ refurbished, repairing the damage and possibly even adding new stuff, like some sorely-needed solo reeds (possibly even some horizontal ones!).
                        Better be careful. If you play too loud, I wonder if the vibration would knock more plaster off the ceiling and into the chambers. LOL....
                        Craig

                        Hammond L143 with Leslie 760

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                        • #13


                          Here's a picture of my small but enjoyable instrument. I still need to clear all the clutter on top, but since there's not much space around the organ, people tend to keep the area rather tidy. We're currently only three organists anyway.
                          Attached Files

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                          • #14
                            Love this picture. I bet that organ is really cool to play!!
                            Craig

                            Hammond L143 with Leslie 760

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                            • #15
                              It is, but you need to learn how to make decent-sounding music with only 5 stops Some of the organists who've used the organ said it's a nightmare, but I like it a lot.

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