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Organ Platform Build - Quick, but Sorta Crude

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  • samibe
    commented on 's reply
    There isn't really anything I would change. It works well. It is exactly the right size for my bench position. I don't ever use the hinges, though I could.
    Last edited by samibe; 06-13-2020, 02:02 PM.

  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    Diapson,

    Excellent question! I know the platforms I've made, I've often wished they looked more like his!

    Michael

  • diapson
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks for sharing the details. One more question, after having this platform around for a while what changes if any would you make? Anything come to mind that you've found yourself saying oh if I would have thought of that earlier or wish I would have done that, what would it be?

  • samibe
    replied
    Thanks for posting a material list. Just a few more questions. Do you think the platform would be stronger if 2x4's were used on all 4 sides rather than just the centers? Did you go with the plywood sides because it was "leftover" and available? Did the plywood sides match the size of the 2x4? Did you use wood screws to attach the casters or inserts and bolts? In order to hide the screw holes and such on the outside "skirt" for the white oak trim did you glue then use screws from the inside? Do you think 1/2 birch plywood would work or would it lose strength and durability so stick with the 3/4?
    2x4s would work for the frame. I used the plywood because it was available and wouldn't warp. I'm also pretty sure that it is stiffer and stronger despite being half as wide.

    I'm pretty sure I used 1" long lag screws to attach the casters. I doubled up the plywood so it was 1-1/2" thick and pre-drilled the holes.

    I glued and screwed the white oak skirt to the plywood frame. The screws are visible on the inside of the frame in the last picture of post #17. I'm pretty sure I used 1-1/4" wood screws but I pre-drilled the holes to keep from splitting the hardwood. It looks like I didn't mention before that I wanted a lip on the platform to keep the bench from being able to slide off. To do that I placed some 1/4" MDF under the platform before attaching the white oak. That made it so that the white oak extended 1/4" above the top of the platform.

    I would stay with 3/4" plywood (not necessarily birch ply). 1/2" plywood will feel flimsy and be more difficult to screw together.

    Leave a comment:


  • samibe
    replied
    I received a couple of questions about my platform today that I thought I'd answer here.

    How much would you estimate the cost of materials? What kind of finish did you use?
    I was lucky for this project because I didn't have to buy any of the lumber. I just had to buy the hardware.

    List of materials:
    (2) 4'x8' sheets of 3/4" birch plywood (probably about $120 total)
    (2) 3/4"x6" x10' boards of a nice wood (I used white oak but I'm not sure of the cost)
    (8) 3" swivel casters (mine cost about $10 a piece, $80 total)
    (1) 2"x4"x10' stud (to mount the hinges to $8)
    (2) door hinges (mine were about $5 a piece, $10 total)
    a bottle of wood glue $5
    assorted screws $5
    A can of semi-gloss wood finish (I can't remember what I used but a durable lacquer would probably be adequate. Probably $20-60)

    It looks like my platform probably cost $250-350 depending on the cost of the white oak trim. As I didn't have to buy the plywood, white oak, or finish, the project only cost me about $100.

    It would be possible to use less expensive plywood sheets and trim hardwood and shave off $50 to $100.
    Last edited by samibe; 06-03-2020, 09:58 PM.

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  • samibe
    replied
    Well, it's been a few months and the platform is still working well. It doesn't amplify the pedal action any more than the floor would. Despite the fact that the organ and platform are directly over the family room where my wife likes to watch TV while I practice, my wife still says she can't hear me practicing (unless she listens for it) and I don't really hear anything from the TV. It has also been really nice to move and work on the organ.

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  • samibe
    replied
    Originally posted by myorgan View Post
    Now the $10 million question--when you play the pedals, does the sound of the action transmit to the platform? I played on an Allen in college that had a platform which came from either the dealer or the company. When I played the pedals, the platform amplified the sound of the pedals, and it was quite distracting. One almost had to tiptoe to keep from making a clattering sound. It was solved by fitting a couple sheets of insulation in the cavity under the pedals so that cavity didn't serve as a resonator.
    Michael,

    The pedal action should transmit its vibrations directly to the floor.
    I was hoping that my design would result in the pedalboard bearing points occurring over the casters or the frame joists and not on an unsupported area of the platform. That should reduce the amount of vibration from the action that can get transferred to any diaphragm-like surfaces. Since the platform and organ are over hardwood floor that isn't the quietest, the floor might be just as much to blame as the platform if the pedal action noise is too much.
    So far (in the few minutes I've had to try it out), the platform doesn't seem to amplify the pedal action. I'll report back if it is too annoying and I have to take some platform dampening measures.

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  • myorgan
    replied
    Sam,

    Now the $10 million question--when you play the pedals, does the sound of the action transmit to the platform? I played on an Allen in college that had a platform which came from either the dealer or the company. When I played the pedals, the platform amplified the sound of the pedals, and it was quite distracting. One almost had to tiptoe to keep from making a clattering sound. It was solved by fitting a couple sheets of insulation in the cavity under the pedals so that cavity didn't serve as a resonator.

    I noticed how you made the dog "walk the plank" in post #18 too! It's like the steps were made for the trailer.

    Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • samibe
    replied
    Originally posted by myorgan View Post
    By any chance, can you take the organ off the platform and take photos of how you dealt with the screw holes for the casters on the surface area? (Just kidding!).

    Leave a comment:


  • myorgan
    replied
    Sam,

    Excellent work! I wish I had your skills and time. I'm not sure how quick and crude your platform was--I'd hire you any time!

    I liked how you reinforced the ends where the casters (& weight) would be on the platform. That helps make sure they won't pull out when they meet the lip of the door between rooms. By any chance, can you take the organ off the platform and take photos of how you dealt with the screw holes for the casters on the surface area? (Just kidding!).

    It can't be said enough--excellent work!

    Michael

    P.S. I really envy your work area. Fancy you making me fall into the sin of envy.

    Leave a comment:


  • samibe
    replied
    My brother and I lifted the organ onto the platform.
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    My plan for the hinges ended up working great. I slid the hinges away from the edge far enough that they ended up underneath the pedal board.
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    In the end I have a platform that is as small as possible (just big enough for the organ), rolls pretty easily, looks just fine in the living room, and has no visible hardware (screws, hinges (unless you know where to look), or casters). I think it's a success. Now my wife just has to get used to the new, looming, piece of furniture in the living room.

    Edit: I opted not to add the power strip to the platform. I still might in the future but right now the regular power cord reaches just fine to the outlet behind the piano. I'll have to add the power strip if I want to use the outlet behind the organ. My plan for the power strip would be to drill some larger holes between the platform halves to pass the wires through, drill a hole through the top of the organ side of the platform just big enough for the organ plug to pass through (and maybe the power strip plug, too), attach the wires to the underside of the platform panels, mount a power strip under the bench side of the platform, and leave enough slack in the wires so that folding the platform does not pull on the wires.

    Thanks, Larry. My dad was the pro. I just spent my entire childhood at the shop playing and working. The shop is well equipped, but my mom is renting it out. Every time I use the shop to build something, I end up wasting an hour or two looking for things because the renters have rearranged everything.
    Last edited by samibe; 04-09-2018, 09:06 AM.

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  • Larrytow
    replied
    Wow Sam, that is ELEGANT !

    That will really be fine furniture when you are done with it. It is apparent that you are pretty adept with woodworking, perhaps even a professional. And what a nice, well equipped, spacious shop you have there.

    Thanks for the photos !

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  • samibe
    replied
    The next morning I sanded the bottom of the platform halves and applied a second coat of paint before flipping the platform pieces over and applying a coat to the top.
    I ended up applying three coats of paint to the top. (The second picture shows the hinge recesses).
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    I rented a 5'x8' Uhaul to move the organ. This is how close my organ fit in it. At my mom's house, I could back it right up to the front porch. I also managed to get the platform to fit, though it was wedged between the organ straps and the bench/pedals.
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    My brother and I installed the casters and hinges after unloading the trailer at my house.
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    Here is the completed platform.
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    Last edited by samibe; 04-09-2018, 08:48 AM.

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  • samibe
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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    At this point my phone battery died. So, there aren't any more pictures for the day. I routed the recesses for the hinges and then sanded everything. I ended up using a buzz sander to put a 3/16" radius roundover on all of the exterior corners. I used some scrap formica to protect the top of the birch ply panels while I sanded the roundover on the inside of the lip. I put the completed platform halves in the paint room and added a coat of paint to the bottom before quitting for the night.
    Last edited by samibe; 04-09-2018, 08:41 AM.

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  • samibe
    replied
    Update time.
    I got my platform built and my organ moved out of my mom's house and in into my house this weekend.
    I remembered to take pictures, but my phone died Saturday night before I routed the hinges. So, I missed a few.
    By the time I got to the shop my plan looked like this:
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    I pre-drilled all of the holes for the screws because I didn't want the birch ply to split.
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    Then I glued and screwed the frame together but I did not screw the frames to the panels. Instead, I used some more birch ply to double up where the casters would go. I screwed the doublers to the panels so that the frame would line up flush with the edge of the panel.
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    I added some birch ply joists next to the doublers. The joists where screwed to the frame using pre-drilled holes and some 3" wood screws.
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    Last edited by samibe; 04-09-2018, 08:43 AM.

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