Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Are Sound Waves Affected by Gravity?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I would like to add, as an electrical engineering student, that sound waves are simply vibrations transmitted through a medium (in our case, air). Now, the vibrations themselves are actually just a speaker cone pushing air around with an electromagnet. The speaker cone produces a time varying force on the molecules floating around in the air in whatever directions the cone is capable of displacing air. These vibrations travel very quickly through a room and bounce of various surfaces. The effect of gravity on these particles is negligible in smaller rooms; however, you'll notice a sag in pitch as you move further from the source in small rooms. This is due to dispersion, the constant force of gravity on the air, and the molecular bonds that each atom experience as their kinetic energy changes. I know that's a lot of information, likely more than was necessary, but yes, gravity impacts sound. While the effect goes undetected to our ears, in very large spaces (suppose a warehouse) the effect would be best observed.

    Say we put a small Allen organ in a living room, then put the same organ in the back of a small church, then in a cathedral. Use the same audio amplification settings in each space without added reverb. Stand at the back of the room and observe the changes in the sound. (Lets also assume that each space is built to MINIMIZE reverberation).

    Comment


    • #17
      The question might be better posed :

      Do sound waves AFFECT GRAVITY?


      Comment


      • myorgan
        myorgan commented
        Editing a comment
        Thank you for the rephrasing, but I already knew that one. I have a lesson I present to my students entitled, Is it possible to see sound? My endgame is for them to see notes as representations of sound, but I also show them videos of sound tubes with nodes and antinodes, as well as an illuminated liquid on the surface of a vibrating item.

        The question I asked was the one I wanted an answer for.

        Michael

    • #18
      Thank you for the rephrasing, but I already knew that one. I have a lesson I present to my students entitled, Is it possible to see sound? My endgame is for them to see notes as representations of sound, but I also show them videos of sound tubes with nodes and antinodes, as well as an illuminated liquid on the surface of a vibrating item.

      The question I asked was the one I wanted an answer for.

      Michael​
      Yes I get it. A wind instrument to demonstrate nodes and antinodes.

      Visually through liquid:



      Another visual thing is on an oscilloscope with an X and Y input two tones can be seen as waves when they are not in tune with each other and then a perfect circle that stops moving when they are.



      But I think the ultimate "visualization" of sound is what it does to our minds, senses and soul through the ears.
      Last edited by myorgan; 10-17-2022, 04:28 PM. Reason: Remove extra white space.

      Comment


      • myorgan
        myorgan commented
        Editing a comment
        @Goff,

        I had forgotten about the oscilloscope! Thank you for another way of viewing sound.

        Michael

    • #19
      Michael, you're welcome. The YT clip of the oscillators on the oscilloscope are 4 osc not just one. The interplay between the 4 tone generators each sweeping pitch, changes visually demonstrably and the intricate wave relationships can be seen while being heard. Important to point out to students they are seeing/hearing 4 wave forms of 4 sounds in combination.

      Comment


      • #20
        Those patterns are call lissajous figures. While the same x and y frequency will produce a circle, harmonics will produce other patterns.

        Comment


        • #21
          Originally posted by dfitz View Post
          Those patterns are call lissajous figures. While the same x and y frequency will produce a circle, harmonics will produce other patterns.
          Yes. Here's a clip explaining that.



          In DAW use measuring devices like Spectrafoo from Metric Halo one can analyze these graph forms allow instrument reading, phase relationships, stereo field readings, volume etc.

          Click image for larger version  Name:	SF_X.gif Views:	0 Size:	163.2 KB ID:	808182Spectrafoo. The small SQUARE graph with the L-R on an X and Y is the Lissajous phase scope. It tells if your mix/instruments are out of phase or stereo mix is CENTERED and a host of other parameters, dB meters etc.

          Lissajous Phase Scope (vector mode) .................................................. ....................................
          Lissajous Phase Scope (X-Y mode) .................................................. ........................................
          Lissajous in Stereo Position Mode .................................................. ........................................
          Lissajous Control window .....

          SpectraFoo gives you a comprehensive, multi-channel view of signal levels, wave form data, signal histories, spectrum analysis and spectral histories, and a variety of phase monitoring tools, including a lissajous phase scope, correlation metering, and the unique Phase Torch™.

          Within Spectrafoo you can read specific instruments in a mix.

          Comment

          Working...
          X