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My beef with Em chamades

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    My beef with Em chamades

    So i finally going to come out as to why I despise Em Chamades. lets be clear first I do like my loud reeds. The reason why I do not like these things is because to me these things are not artistically expressive.

    It irks me to shreds to not be able to have my loud reeds under control. When I look at a pipe organ to me, I consider it a complete ensemble in the sense that each division should have independent expression not tonal expression but volume.

    I will admit i have laid out a postiv that was reed less but was not expressive. The point is to me, is that loud solo reeds have their place but if i am faced with an option of not allowing expression in soloing then what is point of having a dynamic.

    Am i wrong is their something i am missing.
    Instruments:
    22/8 Button accordion.

    #2
    Artistic registration practice would have such reeds used in very few instances--such that if they were under expression, they would be used with the expression wide open. In other words, they are not for use with every piece calling for a reed--only those demanding the maximum. They have a place, but are no substitute for more standard chorus reed.

    You don't often see them placed in a small or medium sized instrument for good reason.

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      #3
      Toodles, gives a good description of the use of the En-Chamade reeds. However, I am really impressed with what Schoenstein did with the organ they built for Christ and St. Stepnens in New York. They have the big chorus reed in a double swell box for the ultimate in control. In this way, it can be used as a chorus reed or even a quiter solo stop. There is an excellent video that showcases the versatility of this small organ. Here is the link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhLbcKeVQK8

      Bill

      My home organ: Content M5800

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        #4
        Some en chamades have been built that are simply too loud for anything. This of course is not good practice, but as with any other product, there are examples of organs poorly conceived and poorly executed on various fronts. When I hear an en chamade that is so loud that one cannot bear it for even a few notes, I have to judge that the builder simply didn't scale it properly for the room. Such a reed should of course be commanding. No use having one if it doesn't immediately get your attention! But if it hurts your ears and makes you want to run from the room screaming, how can anyone enjoy it at all?

        I think the point of laying such a stop horizontally and out in the open is to allow it to speak forcefully, to have its harmonics fully projected into the room without the softening or rounding of the tone that would take place if the pipes were in a box or even facing upward at the ceiling. So it's gonna be crisp, but it shouldn't inflict pain.

        The same can be said for other stops, or for an organ in general. I know of one otherwise very fine organ in my area that is simply far too loud for the room in which it is placed, and I would've thought the normally thoughtful builder of this organ would've known better. But there it is. I have attended programs there, and just had to scrunch up my ears and hope they weren't damaged before I could get out of there. Not going to be rude enough to actually plug my ears with my fingers, but I have wanted to do just that!
        John
        ----------
        Church: Allen MDS-45 with Allen MIDI-DIVISION-II expander
        Home: Allen Renaissance R-230 with expanded four-channel audio and MIDI-DIVISION-II
        Shop: Bunch of organs in varying conditions, some good, some not...
        Half of an incredible two-man organ service team -- servicing all the major digitals in Arkansas churches
        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

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        • Ben Madison
          Ben Madison commented
          Editing a comment
          cant disagree with you their.

        #5
        Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
        I know of one otherwise very fine organ in my area that is simply far too loud for the room in which it is placed, and I would've thought the normally thoughtful builder of this organ would've known better. But there it is. I have attended programs there, and just had to scrunch up my ears and hope they weren't damaged before I could get out of there. Not going to be rude enough to actually plug my ears with my fingers, but I have wanted to do just that!
        John, you make an excellent point. This is indeed an unpleasant experience. However the opposite can also be true. There are a number of organs that I have encountered that sound exciting when you hear them in an empty church, but when the nave is filled, they can be underwhelming. Many of you may have this experience this coming Sunday when the normally sparsely attended service is filled with "Christmas and Easter" communicants. Since organs are voiced when the nave is empty, the voicer may not be aware that this will occur. Obviously some rooms produce this effect more than others.

        Bill

        My home organ: Content M5800

        Comment


        • Ben Madison
          Ben Madison commented
          Editing a comment
          maybe companies should have voicing parties, where they invite people to come in and the company can do tonal finishing while people are downing pizza and sitting in places.

        #6
        [QUOTE=jbird604;n654964]Some en chamades have been built that are simply too loud for anything. /QUOTE]

        Have heard them affectionately called "hair parters".

        Sam

        Allen ADC5400, Allen ADC4000, 1910 Chickering QuarterGrand
        Past---Galanti Praeludium II, Yamaha Clavinova, Hammond A102, W.W. Putnam Reed Organ

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