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Identifying an Allen

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  • Identifying an Allen



    Well, I had my first after school practice on my church's allen today, but I've no clue what model it is. It's quite old, and is branded as Allen Computer Organ, or something like that. How would I identify the model?</p>

     </p>

    Regards</p>

     </p>

    Brendan </p>

  • #2
    Re: Identifying an Allen



    The "Allen Computer Organ" nameplate helps to narrow it down - we know therefore its a digital and will be a MOS instrument or newer.
    </p>

    If you pop open the lid and look at the back of the organ (normally the top left of the back panel) will be a metal Allen plate and on it should be the model number.
    </p>
    1971 Allen Organ TC-3S (#42904) w/sequential capture system.
    Speakers: x1 Model 100 Gyro, x1 Model 105 & x3 Model 108.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Identifying an Allen

      Cheers for that. I'll take a look next monday.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Identifying an Allen



        how does one open the back of the organ? I couldn't see any way</p>

        </p>

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Identifying an Allen



          On most Allens:</P>


          Lift the lid and hold it open with a prop stick (usually built in). There will be 2 or 3 winged tabs that you rotate to clear the top back brace. Then the back tilts outward. Once tilted so it can clear the console top, lift up &amp; pull away from the console.</P>


          There are 3 tabs on the bottom of the back that you don't want to bend or break, so don't set it on the bottom side of the back when putting it down--put the left or right side down.</P>


          Actually, once you lift the lid &amp; look the rest is obvious.</P>


          Toodles.</P>

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Identifying an Allen



            IIRC most Allen plates can be read from just popping open the lid. I can't remember having to remove the back to see the plate.</p>

            Could you post a picture of the organ and maybe a picture of the innerds with the lid open. Perhaps we can help point you in the right direction.
            </p>
            1971 Allen Organ TC-3S (#42904) w/sequential capture system.
            Speakers: x1 Model 100 Gyro, x1 Model 105 & x3 Model 108.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Identifying an Allen



              Well, it's got a rolltop covering the manuals, and a music stand with a light inside the ledge, and I can't see any way of opening the top of the organ (where the music rack is). Perhaps I could write a description of it? I'll get the stoplist, and post that too.</p>

              </p>

              It's 2 Manual, 7 General Pistons (and a Cancel). The Pistons don't move the stop-tabs physically. There's a transposer. There's a tab for Celeste Tuning on the Swell, a Swell to Great Coupler, a Great to Pedal and a Swell to Pedal. No toe pistons, one expression pedal which acts as a volume control for the whole organ.</p>

              Any help would be appreciated.</p>

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Identifying an Allen

                No one?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Identifying an Allen

                  The thing is Allen sold many models over many years that kind of fit the description you've given. The only way for us to tell is if you could post some pictures of the console.
                  1971 Allen Organ TC-3S (#42904) w/sequential capture system.
                  Speakers: x1 Model 100 Gyro, x1 Model 105 & x3 Model 108.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Identifying an Allen



                    Sounds like an ADC 420, 430, or 520 or 530. If the speakers are in the console, it's either 420 or 430. If the speakers are in external cabinets, its 520 or 530. These organs were all built in the 80's. (afterthought: if the pedals are "princess" and not AGO, you have a model 220, 221, or 222 -- same thing on the inside, just smaller pedals)</P>


                    I'm going on the fact that it has 7 blind pistons and celeste tuning. Prior to the ADC era, small Allens did not have celeste tuning, and after the ADC era (MDS, etc.) the celeste tuning tab was no longer needed as celeste tuning was built into the appropriate stops.</P>


                    Also, if you had one of those poor old MDC models (42 or 52), it would say "celeste effect" instead of "celeste tuning" on the tab.</P>


                    So, you have a pretty decent organ. Philip of this forum has one in his home and I have seenmany in even medium-size churches.</P>


                    Perhaps the top of this console does NOT open. Allen had one console style, which was called "contemporary" back in the 70's and 80's, with a top section that could only be opened by removing a couple of screws at the sides and then tilting back the entire upper section of the console, exposing the keyboards and some other stuff. This console was used for the 420 and 520, I believe, or at least in early production.</P>


                    John</P>
                    John
                    ----------
                    *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Identifying an Allen

                      I agree with jBird. That sounds just like my ADC420/520/220.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Identifying an Allen



                        To lift the Lid:</P>


                        If the organ looks like this:http://barton.theatreorgans.com/images/30071658.jpg (and mostsmaller 2 manual Allens work this way except for the MOS organs in the contemporary console), the lid has hingesat the back edge of the lid.(Like a door mounted horizontally), Just lift up on the lid between the roll top and the lid. The lid will swing up and back. This is easier to do with the roll top closed (as it gives a little more finger space). </P>


                        You are probably making this much harder than it is. It is exactly like a lift-lid organ or piano bench. Don't think about it, just do it! Lift gently to make sure nothing is screwed down, but it probably is not,</P>
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                        • #13
                          Re: Identifying an Allen



                          I'll try get a picture.</p>

                          The Celeste tuning tab's on the Swell, and there's also a Viola Celeste on the swell. I tried just lifting the top, but it didn't come off. The Transposer is mounted Horizontal (as opposed to the vertical one in that picture. There's no card reader, and just a switch to turn it on, not a key.</p>

                          As I say, I'll try get a picture.</p>

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Identifying an Allen



                            All those detail confirm my guess. It's an ADC model, based on the 7 presets, the Celeste Tuning tab, and the Viola Celeste in the swell. Pre-ADC models used the stop name "Voix Celeste" and had only 5 presets. Post-ADC models have no "Celeste Tuning" tab.</P>


                            And it's 420/430 if pedals are AGO and speakers are in the console. If pedals are princess-style, it's 220/221/222. If speakers are in external boxes, it's 520/530.</P>


                            If it doesn't look at alllike the photo, your console may be the Contemporary style (sometimes called the "spaceship"). In that case, the top lid does not lift, but the entire upper portion of the console can be tilted back to give access to the key contacts, stop rail, and other upper console innards. There is a screw at each side, either outboard or under the keydesk, about the front edge of the lower manual. With those two screws removed, the upper console swings back and locks in position with a little metal brace. To close, press the metal button on the brace.</P>


                            Also, the back doesn't detach in the usual Allen manner, but is held in place by a couple of phillips screw near the top.</P>


                            So, just tell me if there are speakers in the console, if the pedals are full AGO or the smaller princess, and whether or not there is a tab labeled "Romantic Tuning Off" and I'll tell you the exact model.</P>


                            In any case, it's a nice-sounding little organ. You're lucky to have one this nice at your disposal.</P>


                            John</P>
                            <P mce_keep="true"></P>
                            John
                            ----------
                            *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                            https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

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                            • #15
                              Re: Identifying an Allen

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