Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

another Baldwin ID question

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • another Baldwin ID question

    So I'm watching closely for a used Allen, but Baldwins seem to be coming out of the woodworks. Here's the latest (below).

    Can't find this one in my blue book listings. Looks to be maybe late 60s or early 70s - ? Anyone recognize this model?

    thanks!
    Scott
    Attached Files
    Nobody loves me but my mother,
    And she could be jivin' too...

    --BB King

  • #2
    This is a 46C Should have 32 flat pedals. Same voicing as mid 50's product line which isn't a bad thing. They were nice smooth orchestral voices with pure flutes. I'd actually like to find something like this since my roots were with the 45 model.

    Comment


    • #3
      Your photo is a little too small & too dark for these old eyes to make out the details. Does the organ look anything like the one in the photo I've attached? If so, this is a Baldwin 46H. From what I have read on the Net, these were produced in 1961.

      Me & My M3's
      Attached Files
      http://theblinddoghammondwebsite.shutterfly.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Hmm, interesting M+MM3: the controls look identical, but the one for sale doesn't have that classic Baldwin curvy front rail. So maybe it's as OR4Me suggests, a 46C (C for Church maybe, as opposed to H for Home? Could it be that simple?) From your description OR4Me, it sounds like a really nice organ, maybe something to consider. But I was really hoping for an AGO pedalboard... I'm already afraid I may be ruining myself for future liturgical playing by practicing on a flat Hammond pedalboard. When I try to play the Allen at my lodge (has "Princess" pedalboard), I really fumble over the pedals. They seem very different. Anyway thanks guys - the search goes on!

        td
        Nobody loves me but my mother,
        And she could be jivin' too...

        --BB King

        Comment


        • #5
          This organ is a church model that could be purchased with or without the percussion section. It is an all tube model, and for its day and time it is/was a great sounding organ for church. Earlier models had only 25 pedals as did the 45C, but soon after in production they began to have the 32 note pedal borard although it is flat like the 48C I have currently.

          I will look in the Baldwin info and see what else I can add if anyone has any more questions about this model. You might be better to try and go with a Baldwin 48C or some of the earlier consoles that followed the 48C. Baldwin was a big leader in church organs for a total electronic organ in lieu of the mechanical tone wheel Hammond, and the motors in the Wurlitzer reed models.

          james
          Baldwin Church Organ Model 48C
          Baldwin Spinet 58R
          Lowrey Spinet SCL
          Wurlitzer 4100A
          Crown Pump Organ by Geo. P. Bent, Chicago, Illinois


          Organs I hope to obtain in the future:

          Conn Tube Minuet or Caprice even a transistor Caprice with the color coded tabs
          Gulbransen H3 or G3, or V.
          Wurlitzer 44, 4410, 4420, ES Reed Models, 4300, 4500, Transistor Models

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes, Toaster, the rounded front cheeks were typical of the H (for home) version and the more formal cabinet (square edged) was used for the C (yes, church) organs. As noted mid 60's updates to the line brought 32 pedals and the tone screen completely across the front. Related to James mention of the 45's, they had two speakers with individual openings in a wood front. That's how I spotted the 46 in the photo. Another advance, the 46 introduced rotary speakers and Panoramic Tone (a form of reverb). To my knowledge there was very little difference between a 46 and 48. For those not familiar with the rocker tabs, they were used uniformly accross the whole product line for many years, even into the days of the 210. Theater models were about the only exception.

            Personally, I didn't find the tone as smooth on the 210 and it is the only Baldwin I have passed on in my years of organ shopping. It was available for just $60 the day I found one in a local Goodwill store, but to my ear was much reedier than previous models. In addition to James' comments, let me add that Baldwin was also very proud of it's contact delay system that was thought to give instruments a speech characteristic more pipe like than other electronic organs of the day.

            I'm certain there was a pricing advantage to the home model because the small church where my father pastored when I was a child purchased a 45H in 1958. My father soon had a technician move the speakers to a sound chamber to give the installation better distribution through the sanctuary. I last heard the instrument in 1973 and still found it beautiful. As I recall it was retired sometime in the mid 90's.
            Last edited by OrgansR4Me; 11-24-2010, 06:08 PM. Reason: correction

            Comment


            • #7
              OrgansR4Me,

              Lots of good information in your post. Thanks for sharing your knowlege. You mentioned the rotory speaker in these organs. I've attached a photo of my Baldwin 46H with the rear cover removed.

              Me & My M3's
              Attached Files
              http://theblinddoghammondwebsite.shutterfly.com/

              Comment

              Working...
              X