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64' Resultaunt

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  • 64' Resultaunt

    Allen offers this stop on some of their models, Ive never heard a 64' stop before, what would one sound like, or, I guess, feel like. Is it audible at all?

  • #2
    Re: 64' Resultaunt

    Yes, it is audible. If you have access to an instrument with a 32' stop, just play low pedal C and low pedal g at the same time and you will hear the effect of a 64' resultant.

    dec

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    • #3
      Re: 64' Resultaunt

      I never knew that you could do that! I'll try it at my school sometime

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: 64' Resultant

        >Allen offers this stop on some of their models, Ive never heard a 64' stop before, what would one sound like, or, I guess, feel like. Is it audible at all?

        A "resultant" stop is not actually at the pitch specified, but is a combination of stops (usually two) that tricks the brain into thinking it is hearing a stop at the specified pitch. This really only works well on low pitched stops.

        A 32' resultant is made from two pipes from a 16' rank, root and fifth, which roughly corresponds to the second and third harmonics of the 32' foot pitch, thus explaining how the brain is fooled.

        The Atlantic City Convention Hall organ actually has a real 64' pipe. I think the Wannamaker only has a 64' resultant.

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        • #5
          Re: 64' Resultant

          The Newberry Memorial Organ at Yale University's Woolsey Hall also has a 64ft resultant. It's more of a feeling than a sound. This is 16 Hz, and it's hard to say if it's in tune with anything. The air moves, harmonics bump into each other, and things try to rattle. It probably lends more "feeling" to the sound than actual "tone".

          Bob M.

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          • #6
            Re: 64' Resultant

            >The Newberry Memorial Organ at Yale University's Woolsey Hall also has a 64ft resultant.

            That is one gorgeous sounding organ.

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            • #7
              Re: 64' Resultant

              The pitch at 64 foot low C is actually 8 Hz.
              You can almost count the vibrations.

              The pitch at 32 foot C is 16 Hz.
              And 16 foot is 32 Hz. And so forth.

              There is also a real 64 foot Trombone
              at Sydney Town Hall, Australia.

              Very few others in the world.

              It is interesting to me that the
              Atlantic City Convention Hall organ
              not only has a real full length
              64 foot stop, but it also has a full
              set of harmonic stops. I think that
              all the quints are derived, but the
              Tierce and Septieme are independent.

              Diaphone Profunda 64'
              Diapason 32'
              Quint 21 1/3'
              Diapason 16' (there are many of these!)
              Tierce 12 4/5'
              Quint 10 2/3'
              Septieme 9 1/7'
              Octave 8'

              So there you have an entire pedal Cornet.

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              • #8
                Re: 64' Resultant

                How much Wind does a Pipe like that need to operate?

                64' Trombone? Heh heh, Why not?
                Do they lay the pipes horizontal? They must be heavy. Imagine a 64' wood pipe. 'The power "wood" be incredible.'

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                • #9
                  Re: 64' Resultant

                  Steve is very correct when he said:
                  "The pitch at 64 foot low C is actually 8 Hz.
                  You can almost count the vibrations.

                  The pitch at 32 foot C is 16 Hz.
                  And 16 foot is 32 Hz. And so forth."

                  Also, at the Chrystal Cathedral Fred Swann named the 64' stop
                  "La Force"! :D

                  I think it's a resultant.

                  ~Cindy! :)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: La Force

                    At the great Gabler organ in Weingarten, Germany,
                    there is an interesting pedal stop called "La Force".
                    This stop is a 49 rank mixture (!) however it only
                    plays on low C, so there are only 49 pipes there.
                    Very nice if what you are playing ends on a C major chord!

                    Steve.

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