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  • I have my Principals!

    Howdyrooooo all....
    Greetings from the Muttastery of St. Dogmael! ;-)
    Chapel of All Hounds
    Organ by: Haulen, Barken & Wooooffff of Beagledor, Canada (actually an Allen heehee)

    Just wanted to share some of the fun I'm having with my newly recovered Alterable voice system, as well as my favourite sounds on my Allen ADC-4000.

    I have discovered some rather pleasant Diapason sounds which I have been able to adjust or voice to fit my room and use. The main ones include:

    Great
    Principal 8
    Octave 4 - played octave lower

    Swell
    Gemshorn 8
    Spitzprincipal 4 - played octave lower

    Alterable
    Subprincipal 16 - played octave higher
    Subprincipal 16 and BellGamba 16 - played octave higher
    Principal 8 (different from Great)

    Combinations:
    Great Principal 8 and Alterable Principal 8, also with Swell Gemshorn 8
    Great Octave 4 (or Spitzflute 4) and Swell Spitzprincipal

    Bass supplied with Pedal Octave 8
    All played with a gentle dose of "chiff" which makes the 4' stops sound antique.

    Be it known, however, that I would be ever so happy with ONE rank of PIPES!! ;-)

    Most of the music that I play now is either sight-readable or great literature played slowly for sightreading and acquaintance purposes. For instance, I have almost completed reading through the organ works of Bach. Reading slowly through pieces such as "The Wedge" is amazingly revealing and not only clearly reveals the genius of Bach, but also that the piece is not as difficult as one might think. Reger is another composer whose music is somewhat inaccessible at common tempi, but is wonderfully constructed and is almost like walking slowly through the structural parts of a great gothic cathedral.

    Health considerations prevent me from doing recital level playing, but I am still quite able to enjoy the organ. Experimenting with other voices (on cards) is also great fun, but to me is not as satisfying as THE SOUND unique to the organ.

    I've also been having fun teaching a student Franck's Choral in E via e-mail. That's my venture into technology!

    Greetings allward from me and the "munts" (aka beagles)

    Bruce, Pigeon and Degui

  • #2
    There is always an outlet for your music if you wish to consider "select retirement facilities". I do what I call "geezer gigs" and frankly have had a full stop in the middle of some piece. I laugh and tell them I'll get it this time. They appreciate the effort and it's not terribly different from telling a story at the dinner table and forgetting some essential piece of it. You don't get run out. They ask when you can come play again.
    Roland Atelier AT-90s, AT-80s, AT-70, 30, and 15. Roland VR-760 combo
    Yamaha S-90, Kurzweil PC-3x, Casio Privia PX-330, Roland E-80, G-70, BK-5, Leslie 760, 820
    Moved on:
    Allen 3MT/Hauptwerk, Technics GA1, Yamaha HX1, AR80, numerous Hammonds, including 2 M's, an L, 2 A-100's, XP-2, XM-1/1c, & an XK-3. Roland Atelier AT-30, 60r, 80, & 20r(2 units), and a slew of Leslies (147, 142, 760, 900, 330).
    Korg Triton Le-61, Casio Privia PX-310 & 110, and Kurzweils: PC-2x, SP-88, Pro-III, K1000

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    • #3
      Great to know that their is at least one other Beagler Organist here. Have had beagles since I was in my early teens, thus my user name. Just had to bury one of the best dogs I ever had in November. She was 16.5 years old.
      At home: Allen T12 B, At church: Patrick Murphy Pipe organ. The console is a rebuilt Moller.

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      • #4
        What do you use for an instrument when you do "geezer gigs"? The only retirement residence around here that has an "organ" has a home organ that is so technically complicated I can't get sound from it.

        I've had beagles for over 30 years. My oldest have lived to 16 or 17. I have two now, Pigeon (about 10 a rescue) and Degui who is 13 (also a rescue). My record was a choir of six at one time! That's a bed full!

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        • #5
          Well, my experience with Beagles is probably restricted to "Snoopie". Regarding the instrument, I either use an Atelier or a Yamaha PSR-3000 most of the time. The former is heavy and awkward to move, the latter almost trivial. I used to carry an AT-30 but now have an AT-15 which I built a plywood case for. It wasn't that bad before I did the work, but the pressboard is fragile. Each piece weighed about 55 lbs. When I was done, the top section weighed closer to 70 but the bottom was slimmed down to about 35. The main change was it closed up now, had handles, and was a bit more rugged.

          However, Atelier is a HOME ORGAN, and even if you were interested in taking on my approach, would not solve your problem readily. Better that we, the forum, have a look at that in situ home organ at your local retirement residence. If you're playing classical music, there is much on a home organ that you may simply ignore. The arranger and the rhythm section for starters. You can also forget about all of the orchestral sounds and the Hammond (or Lowrey) stuff. If it's like an Atelier, you are now down to a dozen or less stops called PIPE ORGAN 1, PIPE ORGAN 2, etc. It will probably have a nice set of registration buttons (aka pistons) between the manuals and about an hour spent ahead of time should let you set up what you need and save it to a 3.5" floppy for future use (after someone else deletes all of your settings, or they simply die after the organ remains OFF for a month or so). Tell us the make and model and SOMEONE will have one in their home.

          One final thought. If you actually cannot get a sound from it, then it is broken or disconnected in some way. All home organs default to a syrupy Lowrey organ sound when powered up, at least all of the Technics, Yamahas, and Rolands. I believe Kawai does also.
          Roland Atelier AT-90s, AT-80s, AT-70, 30, and 15. Roland VR-760 combo
          Yamaha S-90, Kurzweil PC-3x, Casio Privia PX-330, Roland E-80, G-70, BK-5, Leslie 760, 820
          Moved on:
          Allen 3MT/Hauptwerk, Technics GA1, Yamaha HX1, AR80, numerous Hammonds, including 2 M's, an L, 2 A-100's, XP-2, XM-1/1c, & an XK-3. Roland Atelier AT-30, 60r, 80, & 20r(2 units), and a slew of Leslies (147, 142, 760, 900, 330).
          Korg Triton Le-61, Casio Privia PX-310 & 110, and Kurzweils: PC-2x, SP-88, Pro-III, K1000

          Comment


          • #6
            If your experience with beagles is restricted to Snoopy, at least you've had a great start! After all, he's sort of the titular head of the pack!

            Your "Gigorgel" sounds interesting. I would have to rely on the "retired organs."

            Ignore the rhythm section in classical music????? One of the most fun performances of Bach's T&F in d-minor was on a band organ. It sounded pretty normal until the triplet section when the rhythm section's ooom-pah drums and cymbals came on. It was hilarious. I tried it in a recital as an encore and the group loved it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Should re-name this thread to "I have my Beagles." :-> I have a now three year old Beagle "Jake" had him since three months old. He is starting to settle down a bit now. Still runs away with your shoes but no longer eats them. Seems to have quite a sense of humor. VERY vocal, but thankfully not when I am practicing. Actually seems to like the organ and curls up on my recliner next to the organ when I practice. Very intelligent but also very stubborn Previously had a mutt, then a Colly, after him a Black Lab, great dog, now the Beagle. Probably the last dog I'll own, probably outlive me!
              Allen ADC 1000
              Large Beagle

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bruise in the Muttastery View Post
                Most of the music that I play now is either sight-readable or great literature played slowly for sightreading and acquaintance purposes. For instance, I have almost completed reading through the organ works of Bach. Reading slowly through pieces such as "The Wedge" is amazingly revealing and not only clearly reveals the genius of Bach, but also that the piece is not as difficult as one might think. Reger is another composer whose music is somewhat inaccessible at common tempi, but is wonderfully constructed and is almost like walking slowly through the structural parts of a great gothic cathedral.
                Well, I'm envious. I've been fooling with the manual parts of JSB P&F in C min for 30 years, am up to page 3 with pedals now after buying a pedal organ in 2010. I'm better at this than some other things I do, but not as good at sight reading as you obviously.
                As far as dogs, I must smell too much of bicycle. They have been trying (and succeeding sometimes) to bite me for 60 years. One knocked me off my bicycle last week, at about 12 mph. Broke 3 spokes, I spent today making a tool to try to replace them. Leave your dogs sleeping by the organ, that is a good place for them.
                city Hammond H-182 organ (2 ea),A100,10-82 TC, Wurlitzer 4500, Schober Recital Organ, Steinway 40" console , Sohmer 39" pianos, Ensoniq EPS, ; country Hammond H112

                Comment


                • #9
                  Spoke wrench, probably $3.00 at any bicycle shop. Adjust to just snug and hopefully the wheel will still be true.
                  Roland Atelier AT-90s, AT-80s, AT-70, 30, and 15. Roland VR-760 combo
                  Yamaha S-90, Kurzweil PC-3x, Casio Privia PX-330, Roland E-80, G-70, BK-5, Leslie 760, 820
                  Moved on:
                  Allen 3MT/Hauptwerk, Technics GA1, Yamaha HX1, AR80, numerous Hammonds, including 2 M's, an L, 2 A-100's, XP-2, XM-1/1c, & an XK-3. Roland Atelier AT-30, 60r, 80, & 20r(2 units), and a slew of Leslies (147, 142, 760, 900, 330).
                  Korg Triton Le-61, Casio Privia PX-310 & 110, and Kurzweils: PC-2x, SP-88, Pro-III, K1000

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It is removing the 5 gear hub so I can insert used spokes is the problem. I think it may take a 12 spline wrench .900" O.D., .850" minor diameter. I turned down a 1" tractor pin yesterday with a bench grinder to .900", today marked the splines with string & am cutting thim out with a die grinder. Shimano still makes hubs, but they are 7 gear, not five. Thanks for listening.
                    city Hammond H-182 organ (2 ea),A100,10-82 TC, Wurlitzer 4500, Schober Recital Organ, Steinway 40" console , Sohmer 39" pianos, Ensoniq EPS, ; country Hammond H112

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sorry to hear of your troubles, Joe. Some dog owners get us all a bad name by letting their dogs loose all over the neighborhood. Hope you weren't hurt and that your bike is soon up and running again.
                      Allen ADC 1000
                      Large Beagle

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