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  • What is this?

    *Ad from 1932 Magazine*

    Is it an Orgatron?

    I am just fascinated by the little chunk of the the 1930's when WurliTzer was creating new technology.

    Naturally, this Ad struck me like a Brick.

    Can Anyone tell me what, exactly, this organ is? They call it a residence pipe organ.. But It looks like one of the old ES organs. In any case, it looks like a very solid console.

    Why have I never seen one before up at auction? Are these that rare that they were hidden from the public eye for all these years?



  • #2
    Re: What is this?

    Gee, Dad - it's a Wurlitzer! It's a residential player pipe organ. Wurlitzer made quite a few of them, some in the best homes of the day - they were, of course, heavily unified and took up little space, as opposed to Aeolian. The difference with Wurlitzer, in most cases, was that their stopnames were more "organ-like" - as opposed to Aeolian, who used stopnames for "non-players" - such as "Deep Bass" and "High Flute." And we musn't forget "Vibrato Strings" (my personal favorite). Very confusing for the organist (if the Aeolian wasn't playing rolls), but a boon to the home market. I digress: the Wurlitzer was less expensive than the Aeolian, but - for the most part - they were well constructed. Wurlitzer could also cram the thing into a lot less space than Aeolian, we well, giving them considerable appeal beyond the well-known brand name. And you don't see 'em around much anymore - because not many have survived; having suffered the ravages of non-maintenance and time - most have been removed and are simply destroyed. There are a few extant examples still around - but not many. As for the Orgatron - Wurlitzer acquired Everett in the late 1940s, but really didn't jump onto the ES bandwagon until after the war - the Series 20 Orgatron - with 4-1/2 sets of reeds (Open Diapason, Flute, Viola, Voix Celeste and Major Bass for the Pedal) - was produced in mass numbers in the late 40s and into the 50s (we have one here that rolled off the line in 1947, unaltered still and working well); the company worked on reducing the weight and overall bulk in the 1950s and produced the Series 50 - only two sets of reeds (Flute and Viola). Eventually, of course, Wurlitzer gave up the "Orgatron" technology and went to their "electrostatic" sound-producing system of one rank of constantly-singing reeds in the mid-50s. But back to the Wurlitzer residential player organ you cite above - isn't that console interesting?

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    • #3
      Re: What is this?

      As the threads change from post to post. I will do my alteration to this thread,as it cought my eye as to my search for the name of the instrument(?) I heard about in my younger years ( long long time ago) but have never seen any information about such a beast.

      As it was described to me.......it was used in many movies. there where to plates that the operator would hold their hands over, depending on the the hands proxmity to this plate determined the tone.

      Has anyone heard of this old age toaster....... are there pictures of this bad boy?

      Mac

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      • #4
        Re: What is this?


        The Theremin, I believe you speak of?



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