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What Baldwin model is this?

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  • What Baldwin model is this?

    Playing a Baldwin organ a couple days ago, I thought of this picture taken at my parents wedding in 1970. I'm pretty sure that's also a Baldwin organ. According to a bulletin I read, this organ is from circa 1962. Any thoughts on this organ? It's funny how I see people wearing these kind of glasses again LOL. I apologize you have to see the people in this picture but I guess it doesn't matter since you don't know who they are.
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  • #2
    Mak1457, I'm almost certain this is the Baldwin Model 10. It had separate expression for swell and great and a crescendo pedal as well. The pistons are actually presets rather than settable by the organists. I've only heard one sick version of this instrument in tour in college and, for the heft and weight of the console alone you would have expected quality sound, but not with this edition. It had clearly seen better days.

    Mark

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    • #3
      That picture is a true classic! If the installation was well done, that organ may have sounded pretty decent. Didn't the 10 have at least 3 or 4 sets of oscillators?
      John
      ----------
      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

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      • #4
        My ignorance shows here but what are oscillators?

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        • #5
          Oscillators make a varying electrical signal, that when presented to an amplifier and then a speaker, can turn into music. Fifties-sixties Baldwins used an oscillator sort of like a radio transmitter. Check out wikipedia on oscillators. Flute (tibia sounds) are a sine wave, sirens are square waves. The more oscillator sets, the more varying sounds the organ would produce. Some fifties organs only had one oscillator set, which produced flutes. With a few tricks in wiring, higher octaves or musical fifth oscillators could be mixed in the fundamental flute sound to make sounds a little different.
          city Hammond H-182 organ (2 ea),A100,10-82 TC, Wurlitzer 4500, Schober Recital Organ, Steinway 40" console , Sohmer 39" pianos, Ensoniq EPS, ; country Hammond H112

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          • #6
            After looking through my old Baldwin literature I think the organ in the picture above is a Baldwin Model 4. A model 10 has more pistons below both manuals, and a model 10 is a very large console equal to many pipe organ consoles in size. If this isn't a model 4 it could be a model 6. If I had a stop list for the organ shown in the picture I am sure I could tell exactly.
            Baldwin Church Organ Model 48C
            Baldwin Spinet 58R
            Lowrey Spinet SCL
            Wurlitzer 4100A
            Crown Pump Organ by Geo. P. Bent, Chicago, Illinois


            Organs I hope to obtain in the future:

            Conn Tube Minuet or Caprice even a transistor Caprice with the color coded tabs
            Gulbransen H3 or G3, or V.
            Wurlitzer 44, 4410, 4420, ES Reed Models, 4300, 4500, Transistor Models

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            • #7
              Organ pictures at weddings are hard to come by

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              • #8
                My remembrance of the earlier organs from the Baldwin Company is that they had the rocker type voicing switches. I suggest that this organ might be later than 1962. By the late 60's the presets between the keyboards were starting to appear. They were numbered C, 1, 2, 3 on most spinets and there was a 4 on console models. 1 was a flute chorus, 2 was strings, and 3 and 4 were combination settings. As mentioned by James, most of the AGO spec organs from Baldwin had very formal cabinets. P.S. Went to Electronic Organ History site to refresh my memory and find a model 6 introduced in 1964 that has the presets between the manuals and tongue tabs.
                Last edited by OrgansR4Me; 09-30-2013, 02:24 AM.

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                • #9
                  The very large Baldwin church organs from the late 40's always had tongue tabs. I am referring to the model 5, the first Baldwin organ on the market which I have played, and the 5A which I saw for several years at the local dealers. Also the model 10, 10A, 11, and 12 are very large consoles as I mentioned as large as many pipe organ consoles. All of the latter ones just mentioned have pistons between both manuals. The model 4 is very similar to the model 5, but has four pistons above the upper manual, and is a transistor organ. I just have printed info regarding the models 6 and 12 currently.

                  After these models and for a number of years nearly all Baldwin Organs had the rocker type stop tabs. The first pistons on a spinet model came in the late '60's, and the church model I have has only 4 pistons above the upper manual.
                  Baldwin Church Organ Model 48C
                  Baldwin Spinet 58R
                  Lowrey Spinet SCL
                  Wurlitzer 4100A
                  Crown Pump Organ by Geo. P. Bent, Chicago, Illinois


                  Organs I hope to obtain in the future:

                  Conn Tube Minuet or Caprice even a transistor Caprice with the color coded tabs
                  Gulbransen H3 or G3, or V.
                  Wurlitzer 44, 4410, 4420, ES Reed Models, 4300, 4500, Transistor Models

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's a 4. I grew up on a Baldwin 10, which was introduced in 1950 (4 years after the 5)... only had one divider generator, but a massive and beautiful console, including two expression pedals and crescendo, and a tripper combo action. The 10 I played had two reverberant tone chambers, so it sounded pretty good, but like all the Baldwins the stops all sounded about the same... stringy.

                    Bill Miller

                    Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
                    That picture is a true classic! If the installation was well done, that organ may have sounded pretty decent. Didn't the 10 have at least 3 or 4 sets of oscillators?

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