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  • Rodgers 22C

    Hello,

    The title of my first thread has a typo in it.

    I am looking for a stoplist or brochure of the Rodgers 22C.

    Does anyone have something they can send to me via PDF?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Hello, janvds;

    I went to work at Rodgers not longer after the 22 series came out. Here is a listing of that series from my Electronic Organ Reference List:
    22A 1966
    22B 1966
    22D 1966
    22E 1961
    22S 1963
    22SA 1963

    I am interested to hear what you know about your Rodgers, since I don't have it among the information I accumulated while there in Hillsboro. Would photos be available?
    If you wish to communicate with me directly, please send me a Private Message (aka "P.M.")

    Cordially,

    . . . (Mr.) Jan Girardot
    the OrganGrinder

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    • #3
      I've followed Rodgers for a long time, and never heard of a 22C. Maybe it's a 23C? I think that one existed; I'll check my brochures and advise.

      Comment


      • #4
        Here is more from my Mother List:
        23A 1962
        23E 1963
        24 1962
        24C 1962

        "23C" doesn't ring a bell, either.

        . . . Jan

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks to all that have responded.

          I've uploaded pictures of this organ. Maybe somebody can help solve the mystery here.
          Click image for larger version

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          Attached Files
          Last edited by janvds; 11-20-2013, 12:07 PM.

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          • #6
            I was thinking of the 24C when I mentioned 23C. This organ is neither of those. The nameplate makes this a very early Rodgers, but I can't advise the model number.

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            • #7
              This is a Model 22S from what I can tell. The flyer is attached.
              Attached Files
              Last edited by toodles; 11-21-2013, 12:29 PM.

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              • #8
                I have service manuals for both the 22S and the 22SA for sale from my collection. Send me a PM for details.

                . . . Jan
                the OrganGrinder

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                • #9
                  All,

                  Thanks for your help. This organ is indeed a 22S- I found the same number written inside the organ.

                  Now for the next question. Various notes tend to "hang on" because the key contact shorting bar is sluggish to return to the "off" position. What can be done to correct this issue? Lubrication? Increasing tension on the shorting bar springs?

                  The keyboards themselves are in excellent condition and in perfect adjustment.

                  Thanks,

                  Jan

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                  • #10
                    Are the keys slow to return, or is the contact moving separately from the keys during the return? If it is the keys themselves, it's probably a matter of dirt/grime/debris that calls for cleaning them. If it is the contacts moving separately from the keys, I have no idea. I have never run across that.

                    But this is a very early Rodgers and they may have been doing something different than I am familiar with in a model this old.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by janvds View Post
                      All,

                      Thanks for your help. This organ is indeed a 22S- I found the same number written inside the organ.

                      Now for the next question. Various notes tend to "hang on" because the key contact shorting bar is sluggish to return to the "off" position. What can be done to correct this issue? Lubrication? Increasing tension on the shorting bar springs?

                      The keyboards themselves are in excellent condition and in perfect adjustment.

                      Thanks,

                      Jan
                      You need to observe the mechanics of how this 'shorting bar' moves.
                      Are there pivot points that could be dirty or have gummy residue from some lubricant that has deteriorated?

                      Occasionally people lubricate things (with the best intention) that shouldn't be lubricated, and the lubricant gums up the mechanism.
                      Sometimes the wrong lubricant is worse than no lubricant at all.
                      'Never ascribe to malice that which can be adequately explained by incompetence.' --N. Bonaparte

                      My friends call me Steve, won't you be my friend?
                      The cast, in order of appearance:
                      Kawai K5, Yamaha PSR-85, Thomas Trianon A-6820, Gulbransen 621-K, Conn 580 T-2, GEM WK1 ST
                      Hammond H-112, Ser. #16518, from 8/16/1971
                      Oh, and let's don't forget the Jaymar!

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                      • #12
                        At that time, ROC was buying complete key actions from Reisner and Klann. Look closely at the points where the shorting crank arm goes through the wooden key action frame. Having had extensive experience with the 22S, I can attest that a small amount of the very thinnest silicone lube will fix the problem, unless the arm is bent.

                        A sidebar on that model: when we lived in Southern Oregon I arranged for the donation of a 22SA to our church in Ashland. I found several W4 cabinets and installed it in the chambers already available in the former Nazarene sanctuary.

                        . . . Jan
                        the OrganGrinder

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                        • #13
                          When key is released, the shorting bar slowly rotates to off position. In other words, the shorting bar is returning to "off" at a slower rate than the keys.

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                          • #14
                            Look carefully at the area where the shorting bar goes through the key action. Do you see a small felt strip surrounding the bar, both near the keyboard and at the back. Those are the portions that need a small amount of thin silicone lube.

                            You might also try gently lifting the bar off the rear of the key and exercising it gently, to polish the metal-to-felt connection.

                            . . . Jan

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                            • #15
                              Jan,

                              Thanks for your help. Are you suggesting a "spray-on" application of silicone, available from the local hardware store?

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