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  • Originally posted by julianjsoh View Post
    This happened a second time after the organ was turned off for an hour and then on (the same sound was heard only initially after power on; it went away after that during the service). Does anyone have a clue here?
    Julianjsoh,

    Perhaps God is trying to tell you something?O:-)

    Your suspicions are probably correct about Reverb. Do you live in a moist/humid environment? If so, that could account for the issues you're experiencing. I know Allen designed organs specifically for humid environments to avoid this sort of issue. The techs can tell you more about this, but that's my first guess.

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

    Comment


    • If it happens again, quickly turn off the reverb stop and see if it ends. If the problem always occurs only with the reverb engaged, and always stops when the reverb is turned off, that pretty much points to a failure of the reverb device itself, whatever your 5300 may have. It may be wise to fully disable the reverb by removing the power from the unit so that it can't be accidentally engaged.

      If you feel that reverb is an important thing in your installation, you can replace the existing device, whether it's the ADR-4 or something older such as the ADAC, with a fairly inexpensive modern-day reverb such as a Nanoverb.

      There is always a remote chance that the trouble could be in some part of the USRM (reverb mixer) that is part of the organ itself rather than in the reverb device. If that is the case, you would have to seek out a source for a new one. Before assuming that anything is bad though, be sure to clean and lubricate all the RCA plugs and jacks in the audio chain, as noises like this can originate with poor connections at various points.
      John
      ----------
      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

      Comment


      • Thanks John and Michael.

        I will try to clean up and lubricate the RCA jacks. What would you recommend to do the lubricating job?

        I live in a hot and humid climate, and such conditions are probably not good for an organ, even though this unit has been tropicalized.

        The reverb is quite important to me, because the church where it is installed has practically zero resonance and terrible acoustics. They basically filled the entire ceiling with sound absorbing material when the church was constructed. When the church is empty, you got a couple of milliseconds of reverb time. When it is full, not only is there no reverb at all, but all sound is sucked up into a vacuum because of so much absorbing material. Good for a praise band, but horrible for choral and organ music.

        If it indeed is the reverb module which has failed (I think it is an ADR4), how easy would it be to use a nanoverb in place of it? Is it a matter of plug and play?

        Julian

        Comment


        • In case anyone is interested, here are some pictures of the ADC in church. Note how large and solid it looks next to the Yamaha Electone. Click image for larger version

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          • Click image for larger version

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            • Nice-looking organ! And at least the church is big enough for the sound to develop. Believe me, I have played in worse acoustic settings. With just a little digital reverb thrown in, it ought to sound quite nice in there.

              The RCA plugs and jacks can usually be lubricated with a VERY thin coat of common petroleum jelly (brand name "Vaseline"). It doesn't take much, and in fact you don't want to leave any of it behind to get thin and make a mess in the heat. So wipe some on, then wipe it off with a paper towel or soft cloth. The purpose is to leave behind just a one-molecule-thick coating that protects the metal parts from corrosion. And it somehow enhances the electrical contact, even though the Vaseline itself does NOT conduct electrically. It just removes the oxidation that would otherwise interfere with good electrical contact.

              Pull the plastic connectors loose from the ADR-4 as well, and push them back on firmly. They too can have oxidation on the pins.

              If you decide that the ADR-4 is the problem, just get a standard Nanoverb or other inexpensive reverb, probably for around $100 US, possibly less. If your organ has the USRM-2 or USRM-3 as a reverb mixer board, it will have a single mono signal, a mix of all the organ channels, that it sends into the reverb unit. Connect this signal to the "mono" input of the Nanoverb. Probably the Left input jack, but it should be marked. Then use the stereo outputs of the Nanoverb to connect the two cables that feed back into the USRM board.

              Before firing the unit up, set the reverb program to a "concert hall" or other suitable setting. Turn the output level all the way down so you won't accidentally overload the organ amps while you are adjusting the other settings.

              Set the Nanoverb's wet/dry knob all the way to FULLY WET. This will prevent the feeding of the dry mono signal back into your speakers. Adjust the input level of the Nanoverb so that the overload indicator does not light up even when you play large chords with pedal on the Tutti registration. Then adjust the output level to give a suitable amount of reverb in your speakers.

              That should complete the setup, and you may be surprised to find that the Nanoverb actually does a better job than the ADR-4, which was a rather primitive reverb unit compared to what we have today.
              John
              ----------
              *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

              https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

              Comment


              • Thanks for the detailed instructions John. I'll monitor the situation and see if the strange sound occurs again.

                On a different note, the capture system power supply tripped again today. It is rather queer, because the capture works perfectly usually for a few weeks and all of a sudden it randomly cuts out and I return to find the capture not working when the organ is powered up. I'm not technically inclined where circuits are concerned, so I'm probably going to ask the Allen dealer for his opinion.

                It's not a huge problem, just slightly inconvenient when it decides to take a break.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by julianjsoh View Post
                  In case anyone is interested, here are some pictures of the ADC in church. Note how large and solid it looks next to the Yamaha Electone. [ATTACH=CONFIG]23148[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]23149[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]23150[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]23151[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]23152[/ATTACH]
                  You know, I really like "tab" organs better when playing "on the fly" (no presets used) So much easier to just look up and quickly scan your stop settings, couplers...etc. and easier to change stops...IMO. I have the drawknob version....and while impressive to look at, its much more difficult to "play on the fly"
                  Very nice organ :-)

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Hamman View Post
                    I have the drawknob version....and while impressive to look at, its much more difficult to "play on the fly"
                    And now we know why "professionals" prefer drawknobs--not just any person can play them, and it makes the organist look impressive.:-B My, what a shallow bunch we can be!:embarrassed:

                    Michael

                    P.S. I'm inclined to agree, playing both tab and drawknob regularly.
                    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

                    Comment


                    • Personal preference: rocker tabs on a 2 manual organ, above the keyboards, or tongue tablets. I like them not to go past the end of the manuals so they are close at hand.

                      Rocker tablets on side jambs are pretty nice, too, but not that common in USA built instruments, except for lighted tabs, now.

                      The real difference, in my mind, is that rocker tablets and tongue tablets, regardless of where they are place (stop rail or side jambs) form a linear list of stops; drawknobs form a 2-dimensional array of stops. We process that visual information differently, and a linear list is faster.

                      Really, the horseshoe console is the best for keeping stops at your fingertips and for a linear array. But those aren't common for classical organs.

                      Drawknobs provide a sneaky feeling of luxury (per Richard H. Dorf). I concur.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by toodles View Post
                        Really, the horseshoe console is the best for keeping stops at your fingertips and for a linear array. But those aren't common for classical organs.
                        Another thread is covering the horseshoe console in churches/classical organs in detail. Interesting read.

                        Michael
                        Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                        • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                        • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                        • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

                        Comment


                        • Folks, the ADC 5300 has developed a new problem. Some pedal stops don't sound intermittently. These include the Trompette, mixture and 4' pedal stops. There is a very very soft sound if you listen carefully, but barely discernible. Switching the organ off and on sometimes helps. The sound comes back sometimes, other times it remains as it is.

                          Looking at the voice chart, it looks to be the 15A group of stops on channel 1. However it seems like the 32s on the same channel sound. Therefore is it a board problem? Would appreciate any help here.

                          Julian

                          Comment


                          • Reseat the associated EPROM chips. If nothing changes, swap that tone generator board with another having the identical board number; changing the EPROMS to keep them with their original slots is not necessary if you just want to see whether you get sound.

                            If the problem does not lie in a TG board, the loss of sound is likely a problem in the AP (audio processor) board or simply in the wiring, connectors, or amplifier.

                            Comment


                            • Have you "exercised" the minipots on that board? Intermittent output from a TG group is often caused by a dead spot on the Gain control.
                              John
                              ----------
                              *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                              https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                              Comment


                              • Thanks John and don60. I will give your suggestions a go. In the event that I need to try removing/swapping the EPROM chips to diagnose the problem, are they removed by pressing on the white tabs above and below the board?

                                Comment

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