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Allen ADC 5300A DK

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  • jbird604
    replied
    Smart move!

    Leave a comment:


  • Hamman
    replied
    This is my ADC 5300 after relocating the batteries.
    Attached Files

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  • jbird604
    replied
    Yes, the USCP is your capture memory board. The two leads coming out of the battery pack are where you need to test the voltage. The two AA cells should give you a reading of at least 2.4 volts before you power up the organ. When the organ is powered up, you may read over 3 volts there, as the charging system is in operation.

    I'd strongly recommend putting that battery pack off the board. In the shrink-wrap it's less likely to leak and ruin the board than the old ones that had bare batteries soldered to the board, but it's still a bit dangerous. If it leaked and got outside the plastic, you might have to get a new board, and it will cost a thousand dollars or more to get a new one from Allen.

    Leave a comment:


  • julianjsoh
    replied
    Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
    The only way to know is to check the battery pack with a voltmeter now and then. It should measure close to 3 volts BEFORE you turn on the organ. Remember that it is under charge ONLY when the organ is actually powered up, so in order to preserve your settings it must be able to maintain a charge for days at a time without being charged. New batteries can often hold a charge for weeks at a time, but as they age they become less capable.

    If you lost your settings, the battery pack is probably weak, so best to replace it now. That's a pretty good sign that it is about to fail completely.
    John,

    Thanks for that. Is this the battery pack you are talking about?Click image for larger version

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    Leave a comment:


  • jbird604
    replied
    The only way to know is to check the battery pack with a voltmeter now and then. It should measure close to 3 volts BEFORE you turn on the organ. Remember that it is under charge ONLY when the organ is actually powered up, so in order to preserve your settings it must be able to maintain a charge for days at a time without being charged. New batteries can often hold a charge for weeks at a time, but as they age they become less capable.

    If you lost your settings, the battery pack is probably weak, so best to replace it now. That's a pretty good sign that it is about to fail completely.

    Leave a comment:


  • julianjsoh
    replied
    Hi guys,

    Does anyone know if there will be some warning given when the memory capture battery is weak? Today I played the organ, turned it off and back on and my saved registrations were all messed up. Some random stops came up. It has never happened before. Could this be an indication of a weak battery that holds the memory?

    Strangely, when I saved everything again and cycled power off and on, the settings were intact.

    Clues anyone?

    Julian

    Leave a comment:


  • julianjsoh
    replied
    You should see a "download" option when you click on the link. Just download the file and you should be able to play it using iTunes, windows media player or any standard PC-based music player.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hamman
    replied
    I played them in "google play"

    Leave a comment:


  • davidecasteel
    replied
    I can't seem to play those links. How do you play an "api"?

    David

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  • julianjsoh
    replied
    Yes, it does, when the Church is empty! When it is full, it's really not like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hamman
    replied
    Sounds good. Articulation sounds good too!

    Leave a comment:


  • julianjsoh
    replied
    I've exercised those pots and (fingers crossed) the trompette and associated pedal stops sound for now.

    In case anyone is interested, I recorded a hymn and a baroque piece (Pachelbel's Magnificat primi toni) today while at church. I reckon the organ sounds really good for something that's nearly 30 years old.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0r...p=docslist_api

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0r...p=docslist_api

    Leave a comment:


  • eaaron
    replied
    I highly recommend this set of 3 tools. Click image for larger version

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    The first tool grabs the ends of the IC while holding down on the edges of the socket and pulls up the IC chip as you squeeze the handle. It keeps even pressure while lifting, while also applying counter pressure to the socket and not the circuit board itself. It only works on larger 24 pin(12 per side) to 40 pin chips, but is invaluable on removing prom chips.

    The second is a simple IC puller that works great on pulling the smaller DIP style chips. You have to be careful to apply even pressure upward to not bend pins, and since this does not apply counter pressure to the socket it is possible to stress the socket to board solder joints if the chip doesn't want to come out of the socket easily. I would carefully insert a small flat blade driver in each end just until you feel the chip start to move, then use the tool to pull the chip out to not bend the pins. It also works great holding chips and sockets when un-soldering so you don't burn finger tips.

    The third is a simple clamp you drop the chip in and give a squeeze. This aligns all the pins into 2 even rows with the proper spacing for a socket or in board hole layout. It only does the alignment in one direction, lining all the pins in rows, it doesn't adjust the spacing of pins in the same row, but I have found sockets tend to be more forgiving in that direction. This comes in very handy with new replacement chips, as it seems no matter the packaging the pins are always a little off from where they belong. It also assures that the pins are aligned on chips you have removed.

    There is a fourth tool for re-inserting the chips that pushes down with even pressure to re-insert, but I have found this tool is not all that much better than carefully pressing the chip down by hand.

    If you are replacing or moving or cleaning more than one or two chips these are the way to go. I know that $40-50 might seem like a lot to just swap some chips, but having the right tool for the job will help in not bending or worse breaking a pin on a chip you might not be able to replace.

    The most important things to remember are to keep counter pressure on the socket, not the board, when removing, and to place a sturdy back support under socket on the other side of the board when inserting. This keeps the stress on the printed circuit board to a minimum.

    Finally... take.....your....time... Once you get the hang of pulling and inserting chips you still need to check, double check, and triple check yourself. In cleaning our organ at church when we received it I went through and pulled and cleaned every socked chip in one cage. Which almost ended badly. I was being very methodical but got on a roll, and should have stopped to take a break sooner. I went through all cards, cleaned every card, and chip and socket. Re-assembled, powered up and had no 8' Montre or 8' Erzahler Celeste on the Great, just a horrific crying whine on those stops. I quickly killed the power, found the TG card for those stops, pulled it out, and found I put one chip in backwards. I couldn't even touch the chip it was supper hot. Luckily I just flipped the chip around and everything came back, but I have a feeling another minute and that IC would have been toast.

    -Erik

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  • myorgan
    replied
    Originally posted by toodles View Post
    I strongly recommend using an IC extractor to remove EPROMs and other IC's from their sockets. See:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IC_extractor

    They are very inexpensive and very commonly available. Most any electronics supply store will have these, but also available on Amazon.com and other on-line stores. They minimize the change of bent IC pins.
    Toodles,

    Surprisingly (or not) this is the first time I heard such an animal existed. I defer to you on the extraction method, as I've only transferred one or two in my experience. I wish I had read this just before I went to the hardware store, though!:embarrassed:

    Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • toodles
    replied
    I strongly recommend using an IC extractor to remove EPROMs and other IC's from their sockets. See:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IC_extractor

    They are very inexpensive and very commonly available. Most any electronics supply store will have these, but also available on Amazon.com and other on-line stores. They minimize the change of bent IC pins.

    Leave a comment:

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