Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1986 Allen with floppy key action

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1986 Allen with floppy key action

    I have received great help from you guys so often... I've learn where to turn for quality advise.

    These wood core allen keyboards are noisy and too light, with too little resistance.
    They have coiled springs in the back that serve to pull the key back up after key fall and I think these springs are the only source of resistance.

    Is there a way to increase key-fall resistance, and possibly make these keys quieter?
    Are these 'spring manufacturers' that make a stiffer, shorter or tighter spring that could replace these original allen springs?
    Is there some other key regulation that trick that could improve, increase resistance?

    My local allen tech said he had never heard of anyone wanting a heavier action.

    When I was young, the Methodist Church where I took lessons from Dr. Roy Knight had a tracker action Holtkamp.
    The action got very heavy when coupling keyboards together.
    I would like my practice allen to help me keep strong.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	centrumorgan2.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	47.9 KB
ID:	611687Click image for larger version

Name:	centrumafterorgan.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	139.6 KB
ID:	611688

  • #2
    Jontb,

    You neglected to mention what generation Allen you have, but since you mentioned 1986, I'll assume for this post that you're talking about an ADC organ.
    Originally posted by Jontb View Post
    Is there a way to increase key-fall resistance, and possibly make these keys quieter?
    [snip]
    Is there some other key regulation that trick that could improve, increase resistance?
    Yes, there is. When you lift the keyboard of an ADC organ, you will see a couple of white, plastic nuts underneath. One of the nuts adjusts the height of the key, while the other adjusts the tension of the key. Just be aware that the more tension you place on the key, the noisier the return you will have.

    The felts on your keyboard are reaching the end of their useful life. Elsewhere on the Forum, there was a post in the past year about how to replace the felts to quiet the return action.
    Originally posted by Jontb View Post
    Are these 'spring manufacturers' that make a stiffer, shorter or tighter spring that could replace these original allen springs?
    I'm not sure about that one. I'm sure there is a manufacturer who could produce replacement springs, but I'll defer to the techs on the Forum for that response. I'm also not sure that's the way to go until you've tried some of the things I have suggested. Rule out the simple first.

    While the action of your Allen will never match the action of a tracker organ, it can come close. For example, when you couple keyboards or add stops on a tracker, the action becomes heavier and heavier. Because an electronic organ's action doesn't change, your experience will never be the same as on the tracker. That said, however, you can come close. I've increased the action tension on one of my ADC organs because it was much too soft when I received it. As you rightly pointed out, it is a trade-off when considering the noise of key-return.

    If your organ is second hand, I suspect the original owner either:
    • Didn't know the difference in the action of the keyboard, and just accepted it as is, or
    • Requested the action to be lightened because they couldn't play a heavier action. This sometimes happens when an organ is sold to a church with an elderly organist or a pianist-turned-organist.
    I hope these things help somewhat. Meanwhile, I'll continue to search for more information.

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

    Comment


    • #3
      Jontb,

      I just wanted to post a photo of the adjustments on the Allen keyboards. This photo was taken from my ADC-4300 with the Swell keyboard raised.
      • On the bottom, you'll see an aluminum bar, and if you look carefully, you'll see where the springs are attached to the bar.
      • Under the front side of the keyboard (top of photo), you'll see a white, plastic nut that is used to adjust the level (depth) of the key travel.
      • On the bottom of the photo (they keyboard that is still in place), you'll see another white, plastic nut that immediately preceeds the reed switch assembly. This is the nut to adjust the keyboard action/feel.

      Click image for larger version

Name:	R_IMG_1642.jpg
Views:	3
Size:	124.0 KB
ID:	595398
      I hope this gives you the information you need.

      Michael

      P.S. Be very, very careful when raising any keyboard. It can crunch computer chips, sockets, and enything else that might be behind it. You may need to open one or more of your logic board doors in order to raise a keyboard safely.
      Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
      • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
      • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
      • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks Michael, this looks the same as mine.
        Does the adage apply 'righty tighty, lefty loosy' ?

        Jonathan

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jontb View Post
          Does the adage apply 'righty tighty, lefty loosy' ?
          Yup. If it comes off, you've loosened it too much!B-) If it breaks or strips, then you've tightened it too much.:'(

          Michael
          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
          • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

          Comment

          Working...
          X