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Goofy question - removing stop tabs from old Rodgers.

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  • Goofy question - removing stop tabs from old Rodgers.

    This weekend I'm tossing out an old mid-70's Rodgers 750 two-manual to make room for a newer MIDI organ a church is giving me.

    I'll be keeping the bench and pedals of course. I'm sure there's a MIDI pedal project in the future for me.

    There doesn't seem to be anything else worth keeping on this old clunker, but I saw a cool picture online of someone who saved all the stop tabs from a church organ and made keychains out of them.

    I'd like to do that too. Is it easy to pull the tab rack out of an old 70's Rodgers 750?

    (What I want to hear is, "Yes. Open rear door, pop out this, pop out that, remove those two screws and then pull the assembly out.")

    Any such luck?

    -Neumie




  • #2
    Hi,

    You may want to keep the pedal switch rail as well. It is located at the bottom frony of the console.

    AV

    Comment


    • #3
      I think you can remove the entire stop rail in one piece. Raise the top lid and prop it up with the included stick. (If the top lid is not hinged, you have to remove three long screws in the rear near the top to loosen it, then pull foward and lift off.)

      Then remove the roll top. You may have to remove a pair of screws with big thick rubber grommets around them that are in the roll-top's track. This will allow the rolltop to go further back into the console, then you can pull it out the top. Or, some of them actually pull out the back after you remove the two rubber grommeted screws.

      There may be a tray containing the capture action circuitry right under the roll top. If so, lift and push it back. It may be screwed down or have some hooks holding it in place, but it should be obvious.

      Now, use some wire cutters to cut all the wiring going to the stop rail. Then you should find that the stop rail itself is attached to the console only by a pair of screws, one at each end, on which it pivots upward. Remove those two screws and then you can lift the entire thing out. The tabs can be removed from the brackets by removing the screw or two holding each one in place.

      If you want to sell the pieces on ebay, you might get a little bit for the generator rack, power supply, and other substantial parts. That's a nice-looking console, so perhaps someone would want it for the wood. They make nice desks or sound-system holders in churches. The keyboards are probably lousy, and the SAMs may be the type that get "sticky" with age, rendering them pretty useless.

      The pistons might come in handy someday, perhaps the expression pedal. But in truth once you decide to junk one of these out, there's not a whole lot of valuable stuff in there.
      John
      ----------
      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by arie v View Post
        Hi,

        You may want to keep the pedal switch rail as well. It is located at the bottom frony of the console.

        AV
        I don't know what a pedal switch rail is. Do you mean the lowest level of thumb-presets? I've never used presets before. Why would I want to keep these and not the others?

        - - - Updated - - -

        Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
        I think you can remove the entire stop rail in one piece. Raise the top lid and prop it up with the included stick. (If the top lid is not hinged, you have to remove three long screws in the rear near the top to loosen it, then pull foward and lift off.)

        Then remove the roll top. You may have to remove a pair of screws with big thick rubber grommets around them that are in the roll-top's track. This will allow the rolltop to go further back into the console, then you can pull it out the top. Or, some of them actually pull out the back after you remove the two rubber grommeted screws.

        There may be a tray containing the capture action circuitry right under the roll top. If so, lift and push it back. It may be screwed down or have some hooks holding it in place, but it should be obvious.

        Now, use some wire cutters to cut all the wiring going to the stop rail. Then you should find that the stop rail itself is attached to the console only by a pair of screws, one at each end, on which it pivots upward. Remove those two screws and then you can lift the entire thing out. The tabs can be removed from the brackets by removing the screw or two holding each one in place.

        If you want to sell the pieces on ebay, you might get a little bit for the generator rack, power supply, and other substantial parts. That's a nice-looking console, so perhaps someone would want it for the wood. They make nice desks or sound-system holders in churches. The keyboards are probably lousy, and the SAMs may be the type that get "sticky" with age, rendering them pretty useless.

        The pistons might come in handy someday, perhaps the expression pedal. But in truth once you decide to junk one of these out, there's not a whole lot of valuable stuff in there.

        Whoa! Now that's a helpful post. Thank you, John!

        I can't imagine keeping any of the stuff to sell. These 750's go for $100-$200 on eBay in good working condition. I am about to acquire a Rodgers Concord 755, but I'm assuming the parts won't translate to an organ ten years younger.

        I can't wait to get home tonight and see if your instructions work. It would be very cool if the project was that easy. Obviously, I'm not going to go to any great lengths for some snappy keychains. But if it's easy as pie, who wouldn't want a collection of these things?


        Thanks again for the tutorial. Very generous of you.

        Comment


        • #5
          AV was referring to the black panel that the pedals rest against at the bottom of the console. It contains the magnetic reed switches for the pedals.
          It's held in place by a few screws from the front.

          td
          Servicing electronic organs since 1969.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tucsondave View Post
            AV was referring to the black panel that the pedals rest against at the bottom of the console. It contains the magnetic reed switches for the pedals.
            It's held in place by a few screws from the front.

            td

            Oo. Very good to know. Thank you.

            Comment

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