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  • Allen ADC Voicing

    This thread was split from this one: http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...n-ADC-5300A-DK
    -Admin

    Originally posted by julianjsoh View Post
    Are there any other things that I need to note for the cabinets? Is there acoustic foam inside the cabinets, for example?
    Julian,

    There is fiberglass insulation on the inside of the cabinets. If you'd like, I can take one of mine apart and photograph the insides.
    Originally posted by julianjsoh View Post
    On a different note, how easy is it to voice these ADCs? I remember that it was a matter of turning some screws or knobs inside the organ to raise or lower a group of stops' volume.
    You should have very little trouble voicing your organ if you have a good ear, and follow the directions to the letter. I suspect Tucsondave, Hamman, or JBird604 can provide both the cage chart and voicing guide for your organ via pdf.

    When I say to follow the voicing guide, I am writing from personal experience. I've had Allens for several years now, and have been re-voicing as necessary. However, recently I was re-voicing my ADC-5400 and the directions said to turn up the Bass control on the 16' Reed channel, so I tried following the voicing instructions through to the end. The Bombarde sound I had been missing finally came through! Lesson learned! It helps to have a good ear, but don't underestimate the knowledge of those who wrote the voicing guide. I was trying to keep the Diapason 16' from being too tubby and never considered the consequences for the other stops.

    Best of luck with your voicing, but be sure to wait for the speakers to be completed. The sound will change when you change speakers.

    Michael
    Last edited by Admin; 12-22-2015, 06:04 AM.
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

  • #2
    This is the voicing chart for my ADC 5300.....yours may be similar
    Attached Files
    Allen 5300-DK, Hammond A-105, Conn Custom 905-DK

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Hamman View Post
      This is the voicing chart for my ADC 5300.....yours may be similar
      Hamman,

      Did you ever get the voicing guide, or did you have to use mine for the 4300?

      Michael
      Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
      • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
      • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
      • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Hamman View Post
        This is the voicing chart for my ADC 5300.....yours may be similar
        Thanks Hamman. Are there specific procedures and sequences to follow when voicing the organ? For example, which stops should be adjusted first and so on? And how much of bass or other tone controls should be applied to specific stops?

        I'm trying to make sense of the chart - do the numerals and letters (17A, 17AA) above each set of stops indicate the group I should look for in adjusting that group of stops? What do the numerals in circles mean?

        - - - Updated - - -

        Originally posted by myorgan View Post
        Julian,

        There is fiberglass insulation on the inside of the cabinets. If you'd like, I can take one of mine apart and photograph the insides.You should have very little trouble voicing your organ if you have a good ear, and follow the directions to the letter. I suspect Tucsondave, Hamman, or JBird604 can provide both the cage chart and voicing guide for your organ via pdf.

        When I say to follow the voicing guide, I am writing from personal experience. I've had Allens for several years now, and have been re-voicing as necessary. However, recently I was re-voicing my ADC-5400 and the directions said to turn up the Bass control on the 16' Reed channel, so I tried following the voicing instructions through to the end. The Bombarde sound I had been missing finally came through! Lesson learned! It helps to have a good ear, but don't underestimate the knowledge of those who wrote the voicing guide. I was trying to keep the Diapason 16' from being too tubby and never considered the consequences for the other stops.

        Best of luck with your voicing, but be sure to wait for the speakers to be completed. The sound will change when you change speakers.

        Michael
        Hi Michael, thanks for offering, but I found out that one speaker was saved and will be used as specimen for constructing the new cabinets. So all should be fine and according to original specs.

        You mentioned the voicing guide - so it actually tells you how much bass/other tone controls and gain to apply to each set of stops? It would be great if someone had a copy of that for the ADC 5300.

        Comment


        • #5
          The circled numbers tell you which amplifier the given stop group goes to, so you can know what is being affected when you set amp levels. the other numbers/letters (underlined) indicate the board (slot number), and A or AA means top set of pots (A) or lower set (AA).

          The four pots in each group on all TG-8 boards are in this order from top to bottom: Bass, Treble, Midrange, Gain (or "volume"). The little pots are slightly delicate, so use a mini screwdriver that exactly fits, and always avoid pressing back on the pots.

          Before you begin you must "exercise" all the pots by turning each one back and forth through its range several times to clean the wiper and eliminate dead spots in the rotation.

          I've been doing this since ADC organs came out in the early 80's. My technique follows the Allen recommendations for the most part, with some slight changes from my own experience. I begin by setting all the amplifier knobs to "8" just so I have a level playing field, so to speak, for all the stops. I also set all the bass, treble, mid, and gain (referred to as BTMG) pots to the exact middle point of their rotation, so that there is no coloration of the original organ sample until I want to add some.

          On the TG-10 board ("Articulation" in slot 20) turn all the pots completely off (counterclockwise), as these pots add the air sound and chiff to certain stops. You don't need to be hearing that sound while voicing, as it will distract you from getting the other controls set properly. On the FG-2 board, you can set the control near the middle at minimum (as it says in the note at the bottom of the chart), and leave the other control anywhere, as it is the tremulant rate and you will want to adjust it eventually.

          Now ... Begin by finding the group of stops that includes the Principal 8' on the Great. That is 19AA, so look at the TG-8 board in slot 19, and adjust using the LOWER (AA) set of four pots. If the Principal sounds weak, turn up the G pot until you feel that it sounds like a reasonable level for a single rank of pipes. Don't get it too loud. Err on the side of low volume if you are not sure.

          Second, adjust the G pot in 19A so that the Montre stop is approximately the same volume as the Principal. It will sound "different" but should give about the same feel in the room, as if a single rank of pipes is being played.

          Third, adjust the G pot in 18A so that the Octave 4' stop is equal to or slightly softer than the Principal 8. It may help to listen to the Octave 4 in the octave below middle C and compare it to the sound of the Principal in the central octave.

          Fourth, adjust the G pot in 18AA so that the Prestant 4' stop is equal to or slightly softer than the Montre 8.

          Fifth, adjust the G pot in 21A so that the Principal Conique 4' in the Swell is about equal in volume to the Great Octave 4. Again, the tone colors will be different, but make a judgment as to the overall volume or feel in the room. This is a matter of opinion. Some like the Swell to be equal to the great, some like it to be slightly less.

          Sixth, adjust 21AA so that the Swell Flute A Fusea 4' is about the same volume as the Great Spitzflote 4.

          Seventh, adjust 22A so that the Swell Flute Bouchee 8 is about the same volume as the Great Rohrflote 8.

          Eighth, adjust 22AA so that the Voix Celeste is more or less equal to the Salicional.

          Now, to adjust the pedal division, look at the chart and note that the pedal stops are in six groups. You are going to have to make judgments here, as to how you want the stops to balance. Generally, you want the Octave 8 in the pedal to be slightly louder than the Principal 8 of the great, so try the lowest note of each stop and set the volume of the pedal Octave 8 with the G control of 16AA.

          Then, with someone else playing the pedals, set the volume of each of the other five groups in the pedals so that the stops in that group have the weight you need in the room. For example, the Bourdon 16 should be a rather full and deep sound, quite loud and deeply bassy. You may need to tinker with both the G and the B pots to achieve what you want to hear. But, note that the two 32' pedal stops are also in that group. You mustn't set the G or B pots so high that these 32' stops become overbearing or create distortion in the speakers. So it's a matter of taste and practicality at this point.

          If your organ has the extra channel just for the bass (a subwoofer speaker), note that the volume control for that amp will also have a huge impact on the overal sound of the 32' stops and the Bourdon 16, so you might have to regulate than control as well if you can't get what you want by adjusting the small pots.

          After setting that group, adjust 17AA so the Lieblich Gedeckt is somewhat softer than the Bourdon 16. The Diapason 16 should be at least as loud as the Octave 8, preferably just a tad louder. So again, tinker with the controls as necessary.

          Groups 15A, 16A, and 16AA contain reeds, mixtures, and solo stops for the pedals, so adjust them to suit your preferences.

          Now you have a general stop to stop balance that should be about right. If you wish to adjust the overall timbre of any particular stop, check the chart to see which group is it in and adjust the bass or treble accordingly, being aware that all the stops in the group will also be affected. I rarely move the Midrange pot, as it can make a huge difference in overall volume of the group. It's usually the Treble pot that will subtly affect the timbre of the stops. the Bass pot is most often used in the pedal division to vary the weight of a stop group without affecting the overall volume. But changing one pot may make it necessary to change other pots in the same group.

          Now you can adjust the pots on the TG-10 board in slot 20. Use the chart and the reference at the bottom of the page to see which stops will have their air sound and chiff regulated by each pot on that board. Then add a little air to each one if you wish. You may not like to have much of this unless you have the organ in a large reverberant space.

          If you have the Brass Choir option, you will have a TT-4 board in slot 14. The pots on that board adjust the overall volume of the notes in that stop. Each pot adjusts about half an octave of notes, but I'm not sure of the order and arrangement. You'll have to figure that out by trial and error.

          The FG-2 boards have the Vibrato rate pots at the lower end of each one. See the chart to determine which group of stops is affected by which FG-2 board, then adjust your vibrato pots as needed. I don't think the general vibrato rate control on the MA board affects anything on this organ, but I could be wrong.

          The Alterable Stops are adjusted by the controls in boards 23 and 24. I generally try to install an Alterable Voice in each one that is equivalent to one of the native stops, then adjust the pots on each board so that the alterable voice sounds very similar to the native voice that it imitates. You will have to use your discretion to set these controls so that the stops sound about right, but don't worry too much about getting it exactly right. It actually adds to the interest of the organ if they are slightly different sounding from the native stops.

          Wow, that's a lot of work! And you have only just begun! You may want to play and listen to the organ for a while and then go back and make changes to suit your taste and your needs. Just always be aware that you don't want to turn up any stop group enough to provoke distortion in the speakers or rattling of objects in the room (unless you want that). But don't be afraid to try out a lot of different adjustments if you feel the sound is not what you want. Above all, have fun!
          John
          ----------
          *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

          https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

          Comment


          • #6
            Ooops.... I told you wrong about the TT-4 board in slot 14 (if present). Just looked at the Allen tech site, and I see that it has the following controls:

            Topmost pot is Gain, overall volume for the entire Brass Choir stop

            Next three pots are bass, treble, and midrange.

            The other four pots are the region controls that adjust the volume of the notes in four groups. I suppose there are roughly 15 or 16 notes per region.

            So, IF you have the somewhat rare Brass Choir option, that is how you adjust it.
            John
            ----------
            *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

            https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
              On the TG-10 board ("Articulation" in slot 20) turn all the pots completely off (counterclockwise), as these pots add the air sound and chiff to certain stops. You don't need to be hearing that sound while voicing, as it will distract you from getting the other controls set properly. On the FG-2 board, you can set the control near the middle at minimum (as it says in the note at the bottom of the chart), and leave the other control anywhere, as it is the tremulant rate and you will want to adjust it eventually.
              Alternately, you can always turn off the General Tab that says Articulation Off. It makes it much easier to voice that way. You may also wish to turn off the Romantic Tuning--just as a means of hearing pure sound rather than "affected" sound while voicing. Personally, I stay away from the TG-10 card, because Articulation is a tricky thing to manage on one of these organs. It applies across several stops.

              What John just provided is, in essence, a voicing guide. Unfortunately, they are only available to Allen techs, unless you were lucky enough to have received one with the organ when you purchased it. The Cage Chart (pictured earlier in this thread by Hamman), and Voicing Guide (essentially John's post) are the two essential items for making your organ fit a new space. Unfortunately, not everyone has a good ear for voicing, but it can be acquired over time.

              Best of luck with your voicing endeavors.

              Michael
              Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
              • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
              • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
              • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 6 Pianos

              Comment


              • #8
                John, thanks a million! I have tried, unsuccessfully, to get numerous knowledgeable people over to help me voice my organ. This is a tremendous help!!
                Allen 5300-DK, Hammond A-105, Conn Custom 905-DK

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
                  The circled numbers tell you which amplifier the given stop group goes to, so you can know what is being affected when you set amp levels. the other numbers/letters (underlined) indicate the board (slot number), and A or AA means top set of pots (A) or lower set (AA).

                  The four pots in each group on all TG-8 boards are in this order from top to bottom: Bass, Treble, Midrange, Gain (or "volume"). The little pots are slightly delicate, so use a mini screwdriver that exactly fits, and always avoid pressing back on the pots.

                  Before you begin you must "exercise" all the pots by turning each one back and forth through its range several times to clean the wiper and eliminate dead spots in the rotation.

                  I've been doing this since ADC organs came out in the early 80's. My technique follows the Allen recommendations for the most part, with some slight changes from my own experience. I begin by setting all the amplifier knobs to "8" just so I have a level playing field, so to speak, for all the stops. I also set all the bass, treble, mid, and gain (referred to as BTMG) pots to the exact middle point of their rotation, so that there is no coloration of the original organ sample until I want to add some.

                  On the TG-10 board ("Articulation" in slot 20) turn all the pots completely off (counterclockwise), as these pots add the air sound and chiff to certain stops. You don't need to be hearing that sound while voicing, as it will distract you from getting the other controls set properly. On the FG-2 board, you can set the control near the middle at minimum (as it says in the note at the bottom of the chart), and leave the other control anywhere, as it is the tremulant rate and you will want to adjust it eventually.

                  Now ... Begin by finding the group of stops that includes the Principal 8' on the Great. That is 19AA, so look at the TG-8 board in slot 19, and adjust using the LOWER (AA) set of four pots. If the Principal sounds weak, turn up the G pot until you feel that it sounds like a reasonable level for a single rank of pipes. Don't get it too loud. Err on the side of low volume if you are not sure.

                  Second, adjust the G pot in 19A so that the Montre stop is approximately the same volume as the Principal. It will sound "different" but should give about the same feel in the room, as if a single rank of pipes is being played.

                  Third, adjust the G pot in 18A so that the Octave 4' stop is equal to or slightly softer than the Principal 8. It may help to listen to the Octave 4 in the octave below middle C and compare it to the sound of the Principal in the central octave.

                  Fourth, adjust the G pot in 18AA so that the Prestant 4' stop is equal to or slightly softer than the Montre 8.

                  Fifth, adjust the G pot in 21A so that the Principal Conique 4' in the Swell is about equal in volume to the Great Octave 4. Again, the tone colors will be different, but make a judgment as to the overall volume or feel in the room. This is a matter of opinion. Some like the Swell to be equal to the great, some like it to be slightly less.

                  Sixth, adjust 21AA so that the Swell Flute A Fusea 4' is about the same volume as the Great Spitzflote 4.

                  Seventh, adjust 22A so that the Swell Flute Bouchee 8 is about the same volume as the Great Rohrflote 8.

                  Eighth, adjust 22AA so that the Voix Celeste is more or less equal to the Salicional.

                  Now, to adjust the pedal division, look at the chart and note that the pedal stops are in six groups. You are going to have to make judgments here, as to how you want the stops to balance. Generally, you want the Octave 8 in the pedal to be slightly louder than the Principal 8 of the great, so try the lowest note of each stop and set the volume of the pedal Octave 8 with the G control of 16AA.

                  Then, with someone else playing the pedals, set the volume of each of the other five groups in the pedals so that the stops in that group have the weight you need in the room. For example, the Bourdon 16 should be a rather full and deep sound, quite loud and deeply bassy. You may need to tinker with both the G and the B pots to achieve what you want to hear. But, note that the two 32' pedal stops are also in that group. You mustn't set the G or B pots so high that these 32' stops become overbearing or create distortion in the speakers. So it's a matter of taste and practicality at this point.

                  If your organ has the extra channel just for the bass (a subwoofer speaker), note that the volume control for that amp will also have a huge impact on the overal sound of the 32' stops and the Bourdon 16, so you might have to regulate than control as well if you can't get what you want by adjusting the small pots.

                  After setting that group, adjust 17AA so the Lieblich Gedeckt is somewhat softer than the Bourdon 16. The Diapason 16 should be at least as loud as the Octave 8, preferably just a tad louder. So again, tinker with the controls as necessary.

                  Groups 15A, 16A, and 16AA contain reeds, mixtures, and solo stops for the pedals, so adjust them to suit your preferences.

                  Now you have a general stop to stop balance that should be about right. If you wish to adjust the overall timbre of any particular stop, check the chart to see which group is it in and adjust the bass or treble accordingly, being aware that all the stops in the group will also be affected. I rarely move the Midrange pot, as it can make a huge difference in overall volume of the group. It's usually the Treble pot that will subtly affect the timbre of the stops. the Bass pot is most often used in the pedal division to vary the weight of a stop group without affecting the overall volume. But changing one pot may make it necessary to change other pots in the same group.

                  Now you can adjust the pots on the TG-10 board in slot 20. Use the chart and the reference at the bottom of the page to see which stops will have their air sound and chiff regulated by each pot on that board. Then add a little air to each one if you wish. You may not like to have much of this unless you have the organ in a large reverberant space.

                  If you have the Brass Choir option, you will have a TT-4 board in slot 14. The pots on that board adjust the overall volume of the notes in that stop. Each pot adjusts about half an octave of notes, but I'm not sure of the order and arrangement. You'll have to figure that out by trial and error.

                  The FG-2 boards have the Vibrato rate pots at the lower end of each one. See the chart to determine which group of stops is affected by which FG-2 board, then adjust your vibrato pots as needed. I don't think the general vibrato rate control on the MA board affects anything on this organ, but I could be wrong.

                  The Alterable Stops are adjusted by the controls in boards 23 and 24. I generally try to install an Alterable Voice in each one that is equivalent to one of the native stops, then adjust the pots on each board so that the alterable voice sounds very similar to the native voice that it imitates. You will have to use your discretion to set these controls so that the stops sound about right, but don't worry too much about getting it exactly right. It actually adds to the interest of the organ if they are slightly different sounding from the native stops.

                  Wow, that's a lot of work! And you have only just begun! You may want to play and listen to the organ for a while and then go back and make changes to suit your taste and your needs. Just always be aware that you don't want to turn up any stop group enough to provoke distortion in the speakers or rattling of objects in the room (unless you want that). But don't be afraid to try out a lot of different adjustments if you feel the sound is not what you want. Above all, have fun!
                  John, thanks so much for your wisdom and insight! This is supremely useful, and I suspect I will be having some fun with the voicing after Christmas.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Slightly more sophisticated than my 5000.
                    Allen MOS 1105 (1982)
                    Allen ADC 5000 (1985) w/ MDS Expander II (drawer unit)
                    Henry Reinich Pipe 2m/29ranks (1908)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I went through this procedure this weekend. Once on Friday and again on Saturday....only because I wanted to make sure I did it right on Friday All the bass pots were mostly turned up as well as the midrange and some treble too. Also the gains were all over the place. So like John said....I exercised all the pots and placed them in the middle before beginning the voicing procedure. Just doing that helped tremendously! I did have to do some gain adjustments as well as some tone control adjustments. However, very little was needed. The worst offender was the articulation on the 8' principal and other stops in that group. I had to finally turn the pot all the way down to get it half decent sounding.
                      The other thing I had going on for quite some time was a scratchy/static-y distorted reverb. I swore it was my reverb unit....a Alesis Nanoverb....well after shelling out some money for a TC Helicon unit, I ended up with the same issue! It turned out being the attenuation pots on the actual reverb amp......had to exercise them for about 10 minutes before all was clean again.
                      Well, Now my 5300 is at its best!
                      Oh! I almost forgot, when I was down at the local music/audio shop buying (then returning) my reverb unit, I glanced over at the keyboard section and noticed not a soul was in there. This was my chance to go tinker while not competing with 4 others on the various keyboards. Ended up walking out of there with the Roland DS 88 weighted synth/keyboard...hooked it up to the Allen's midi, set the channel, and...... it works!! Yes, I know, only note on and note off, but I just set the voice to a orch. string patch and use the Swell Midi rocker and it sounds so good with the rest of the organ! And the expression works on it perfectly.
                      So, all and all I had a great weekend!
                      Again, Thanks John for your voicing instructions...that was a tremendous help!!

                      Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
                      The circled numbers tell you which amplifier the given stop group goes to, so you can know what is being affected when you set amp levels. the other numbers/letters (underlined) indicate the board (slot number), and A or AA means top set of pots (A) or lower set (AA).

                      The four pots in each group on all TG-8 boards are in this order from top to bottom: Bass, Treble, Midrange, Gain (or "volume"). The little pots are slightly delicate, so use a mini screwdriver that exactly fits, and always avoid pressing back on the pots.

                      Before you begin you must "exercise" all the pots by turning each one back and forth through its range several times to clean the wiper and eliminate dead spots in the rotation.

                      I've been doing this since ADC organs came out in the early 80's. My technique follows the Allen recommendations for the most part, with some slight changes from my own experience. I begin by setting all the amplifier knobs to "8" just so I have a level playing field, so to speak, for all the stops. I also set all the bass, treble, mid, and gain (referred to as BTMG) pots to the exact middle point of their rotation, so that there is no coloration of the original organ sample until I want to add some.

                      On the TG-10 board ("Articulation" in slot 20) turn all the pots completely off (counterclockwise), as these pots add the air sound and chiff to certain stops. You don't need to be hearing that sound while voicing, as it will distract you from getting the other controls set properly. On the FG-2 board, you can set the control near the middle at minimum (as it says in the note at the bottom of the chart), and leave the other control anywhere, as it is the tremulant rate and you will want to adjust it eventually.

                      Now ... Begin by finding the group of stops that includes the Principal 8' on the Great. That is 19AA, so look at the TG-8 board in slot 19, and adjust using the LOWER (AA) set of four pots. If the Principal sounds weak, turn up the G pot until you feel that it sounds like a reasonable level for a single rank of pipes. Don't get it too loud. Err on the side of low volume if you are not sure.

                      Second, adjust the G pot in 19A so that the Montre stop is approximately the same volume as the Principal. It will sound "different" but should give about the same feel in the room, as if a single rank of pipes is being played.

                      Third, adjust the G pot in 18A so that the Octave 4' stop is equal to or slightly softer than the Principal 8. It may help to listen to the Octave 4 in the octave below middle C and compare it to the sound of the Principal in the central octave.

                      Fourth, adjust the G pot in 18AA so that the Prestant 4' stop is equal to or slightly softer than the Montre 8.

                      Fifth, adjust the G pot in 21A so that the Principal Conique 4' in the Swell is about equal in volume to the Great Octave 4. Again, the tone colors will be different, but make a judgment as to the overall volume or feel in the room. This is a matter of opinion. Some like the Swell to be equal to the great, some like it to be slightly less.

                      Sixth, adjust 21AA so that the Swell Flute A Fusea 4' is about the same volume as the Great Spitzflote 4.

                      Seventh, adjust 22A so that the Swell Flute Bouchee 8 is about the same volume as the Great Rohrflote 8.

                      Eighth, adjust 22AA so that the Voix Celeste is more or less equal to the Salicional.

                      Now, to adjust the pedal division, look at the chart and note that the pedal stops are in six groups. You are going to have to make judgments here, as to how you want the stops to balance. Generally, you want the Octave 8 in the pedal to be slightly louder than the Principal 8 of the great, so try the lowest note of each stop and set the volume of the pedal Octave 8 with the G control of 16AA.

                      Then, with someone else playing the pedals, set the volume of each of the other five groups in the pedals so that the stops in that group have the weight you need in the room. For example, the Bourdon 16 should be a rather full and deep sound, quite loud and deeply bassy. You may need to tinker with both the G and the B pots to achieve what you want to hear. But, note that the two 32' pedal stops are also in that group. You mustn't set the G or B pots so high that these 32' stops become overbearing or create distortion in the speakers. So it's a matter of taste and practicality at this point.

                      If your organ has the extra channel just for the bass (a subwoofer speaker), note that the volume control for that amp will also have a huge impact on the overal sound of the 32' stops and the Bourdon 16, so you might have to regulate than control as well if you can't get what you want by adjusting the small pots.

                      After setting that group, adjust 17AA so the Lieblich Gedeckt is somewhat softer than the Bourdon 16. The Diapason 16 should be at least as loud as the Octave 8, preferably just a tad louder. So again, tinker with the controls as necessary.

                      Groups 15A, 16A, and 16AA contain reeds, mixtures, and solo stops for the pedals, so adjust them to suit your preferences.

                      Now you have a general stop to stop balance that should be about right. If you wish to adjust the overall timbre of any particular stop, check the chart to see which group is it in and adjust the bass or treble accordingly, being aware that all the stops in the group will also be affected. I rarely move the Midrange pot, as it can make a huge difference in overall volume of the group. It's usually the Treble pot that will subtly affect the timbre of the stops. the Bass pot is most often used in the pedal division to vary the weight of a stop group without affecting the overall volume. But changing one pot may make it necessary to change other pots in the same group.

                      Now you can adjust the pots on the TG-10 board in slot 20. Use the chart and the reference at the bottom of the page to see which stops will have their air sound and chiff regulated by each pot on that board. Then add a little air to each one if you wish. You may not like to have much of this unless you have the organ in a large reverberant space.

                      If you have the Brass Choir option, you will have a TT-4 board in slot 14. The pots on that board adjust the overall volume of the notes in that stop. Each pot adjusts about half an octave of notes, but I'm not sure of the order and arrangement. You'll have to figure that out by trial and error.

                      The FG-2 boards have the Vibrato rate pots at the lower end of each one. See the chart to determine which group of stops is affected by which FG-2 board, then adjust your vibrato pots as needed. I don't think the general vibrato rate control on the MA board affects anything on this organ, but I could be wrong.

                      The Alterable Stops are adjusted by the controls in boards 23 and 24. I generally try to install an Alterable Voice in each one that is equivalent to one of the native stops, then adjust the pots on each board so that the alterable voice sounds very similar to the native voice that it imitates. You will have to use your discretion to set these controls so that the stops sound about right, but don't worry too much about getting it exactly right. It actually adds to the interest of the organ if they are slightly different sounding from the native stops.

                      Wow, that's a lot of work! And you have only just begun! You may want to play and listen to the organ for a while and then go back and make changes to suit your taste and your needs. Just always be aware that you don't want to turn up any stop group enough to provoke distortion in the speakers or rattling of objects in the room (unless you want that). But don't be afraid to try out a lot of different adjustments if you feel the sound is not what you want. Above all, have fun!
                      Allen 5300-DK, Hammond A-105, Conn Custom 905-DK

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                      • #12
                        Good deal! I hope you'll enjoy your Allen immensely. (And if you get tired of it, let me know and I'll let you bring it to me.)
                        John
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Hamman View Post
                          The worst offender was the articulation on the 8' principal and other stops in that group. I had to finally turn the pot all the way down to get it half decent sounding.
                          Sounds good, Hamman. Were you referring to the TG-10 board in slot 20 for the articulation?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by julianjsoh View Post
                            Sounds good, Hamman. Were you referring to the TG-10 board in slot 20 for the articulation?
                            Yes...C8 would be the pot that controls the great principal 8. It did very little in controlling the amount of articulation for that stop. I also have T1 and T2 on that board, both turned down too.
                            I hate to switch the articulation rocker off since some of my other stops and pedals sound good with it....but its the only way to get rid of that "white" noise sound on quiet passages with the 8' Prinzipal
                            Allen 5300-DK, Hammond A-105, Conn Custom 905-DK

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                            • #15
                              By trial and error you can discover which EPROM on the tg-10 has the objectionable noise, then remove it. The rest of the stops will still have their articulation.
                              John
                              ----------
                              *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

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