Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Allen 424-G

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Allen 424-G

    Hi to all Allen enthusiasts
    I've recently been offered the above Allen organ for free, not sure if it goes as it hasn't been played for years and has a key lock
    The cord is frayed but I did plug it in and it did light up but no sound with out the key.
    The question is are these organs easily repairable, and are parts available? I only have experience with tonewheel Hammond organs.
    But I've persuaded the school where the organ is located not to throw it out

  • #2
    Geoff,

    You can find most of Allen's manuals (for digital organs) here: http://www.allenorgan.com/www/suppor...rsmanuals.html. If I'm not mistaken, your organ is a theatre organ? I think your organ will be listed under the More Organs section, and then in the MOS-1 section (maybe MOS-2?). I'm glad you convinced the school to not throw it out. Now, to get it working for you.

    Personally, I know Allens are very repairable, as all mine are used. However, I live a bit closer to the Allen factory than you do. For the repairability of an Allen "down under," you'd have to ask someone from Australia who knows about the organ market there.

    I am a bit confused by your description, though. The only key(s) required for an older Allen like that are for a locking cover (usually roll-top on classical organs), and for the combination action (the buttons under the keyboards). If the lights come on and the cover is closed, the organ was probably left on. The organ may have had internal speakers, and therefore, you'd need to hook them up before the organ would play.

    We have some excellent Allen techs here who may be able to help you in your endeavors. Again, I hope you can easily get the old organ playing. May I suggest some photos of the organ, as well as the insides? Often pictures may tell what is wrong with an organ--if something is.

    Best of luck with the organ.

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

    Comment


    • #3
      Michael

      Thanks for your informative reply, what you say about the key being left on and the internal speakers disconnected makes sense
      ,However I wont be able to do anything with the organ until about August,because the organ is located in Auckland New Zealand and I live in Australia.
      The organ is located at a christian based school, formerly a Lutheran School and Church ,started by Dutch immigrants to New Zealand in the aftermath of WW2

      I used to live a few doors down from the school and hope to store the Allen organ at my former home if the school wants it out,they were also going to throw out a piano as well,
      The people who run the current school are from Pacific Island backgrounds and dont have much connection to classical music',they use guitars and Yamaha Keyboards [no disrespect to Pacific Islanders or Yamaha Keyboards intended]
      I checked the internet and Allen 424-g came up as Mos1 1974,I've convinced the school to save the organ and piano until a new home can be found or they can learn to use the Allen

      The Allen must have cost the Lutherans tens of thousands of dollars back in the seventies so I'm determined to save it

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by geoffbrown View Post
        The Allen must have cost the Lutherans tens of thousands of dollars back in the seventies so I'm determined to save it
        Geoff,

        That's very altruistic of you--especially in Winter! Our Winter is just ending--with an impending snowstorm.=-O

        Be careful. I started collecting organs by salvaging one after another, so now we're buried, but I'm OK with that. I believe the organ you will be obtaining is a theatre organ. Regarding any of the other details, I'd have to defer to the brochure. If you find the dimensions of another 2-manual Allen Theatre organ that is MOS-1, you'll probably be in the ballpark with the size of the organ.

        Thank you for saving another couple of instruments from the dump! You never know, it might capture the imagination of some young student somewhere.

        Michael
        Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
        • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
        • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
        • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

        Comment


        • #5
          Geoff,

          At Michael's prompting, I'm chiming in with some info on the console dimensions. Unfortunately, Allen has cut back on the amount of info on their tech site about older organs. I couldn't find a specific set of drawings for the 424, but I found that there was a series of models in both MOS-1 and MOS-2 in the 400 series. I can only guess that they all shared the same general features. Other 400 series Allen digital theater organs that I've seen have been more or less like this.

          So, what I find is that, at least for the ones still mentioned on the Allen site, these models were built in the "S" type console, better known as the "princess" console. The styling is a lovely classic look with curves and elegant moldings. With the pedalboard pulled off, the console is about 30" deep at the arms, easily fitting through almost any door. The overall width of the console is just over 51" and the depth with pedals installed and the bench set in place is about 50". So it's a bit more compact than the standard AGO consoles.

          The console will weigh about 350 pounds, and the pedals 60 and the bench 40 for a total of about 450 pounds. The weight may vary by 20 pounds or so depending on the exact set of optional equipment installed in the console.

          The pedals are "princess" style, which is a design with 32 pedals like AGO organs, but the pedals are just a tiny bit narrower and closer together, with the sharps most noticeably smaller that AGO. As you may know, this pedal design is an obstacle for some organists who insist on playing on AGO pedalboards only. Others find they have little trouble adapting to this slightly compressed design. Personally, I don't have much trouble playing this type pedals, though I do prefer and enjoy the feel of the expansive AGO pedals on full-size Allen consoles when I have the choice. But I have played many princess pedalboards in my life, and have enjoyed them. They are excellent for any smaller space where a full-size AGO console and pedalboard would take up too much space.

          This MOS-1 organ would have the "theater" set of voices, which means it is not strictly speaking a church or classical model. But the sounds are good and satisfying, and not radically different from the classical sounds on the MOS-1 church models. There are even some interesting and fun sounds that you'd never find on a strictly classical organ.

          I'm glad you're making an effort to save this organ. It certainly is too good an organ to throw away.

          EDIT: If by chance this one is not in the "S" console but in a genuine AGO console, it would be in the "Contemporary" style, which has a true AGO pedalboard, is about 32" deep at the arms, 56" wide, 54" deep with pedals and bench installed. Weighs about 350 pounds, but the pedals weigh 92 pounds, as the AGO pedalboard is that must heftier than the princess.
          John
          ----------
          *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

          https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

          Comment


          • #6
            John

            Thanks for the great info, I've convinced the school not to throw out the Allen or the piano out of respect to the Lutherans who worked so hard to buy these instruments and explained what a great instrument the Allen Organ is,however they prefer the convenience of the portable keyboard which suits their teaching style.
            Next time I go over to New Zealand, the Allen and piano will get moved to my garage up the road, then I will find a suitable home for both.
            I think it must be a "Princess console as it was not excessively large and I watched a youtube demo of a Mos1 organ very impressive

            Comment

            Working...
            X