Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Digital Organ prices

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Digital Organ prices

    I always had the curiosity to know what the prices of digital organs practiced in the US.

    I found a brochure on the internet that speaks a Rodgers Infinity 484 is costing close to US $ 200,000.00 is this price right?


  • #2
    Doesn't surpries me.
    I know a man that bought one. He built an entire house around his new music room, which is about 50' x 50' x 25' high, with an entryway carved out of one corner. There are two grand pianos down one side of the L. There are 6 channels of audio set in the ceiling. So the organ would have been a minority of all that expense.
    He is generous enough to host concerts a couple of times a year.
    city Hammond H-182 organ (2 ea),A100,10-82 TC, Wurlitzer 4500, Schober Recital Organ, Steinway 40" console , Sohmer 39" pianos, Ensoniq EPS, ; country Hammond H112

    Comment


    • #3
      There are many things that go into pricing such as lighted drawnobs verses mechanical drawnobs, size of the audio system, amount of customization the purchaser desires among other variables. Competition between Allen and Rodgers may also effect the price. It is certainly possible to spend $200K on a fine instrument.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi,

        According to a price list that I have, it is certainly possible that a Rodgers Infinity 484 could be sold for $200K (US dollars). However I would say that it would be likely the Platinum version, meaning it would have the UHT keyboards on it, and also double audio. There are also options available, which could further drive up the price.

        Traditionally, Allen and Rodgers dealers viewed large 3 manual, 4 manual and 5 manual organs as the part of the business where they made good money. Typically they did not make much money on entry level organs, as they had to compete with the various European offerings, and their margins were a lot less.

        Now even Allen and Rodgers are having a tough time in the high end, as they not only have to compete with European organs, but also with Hauptwerk and other virtual organ offerings.

        And to keep dealers more honest, everybody is going after fewer and fewer sales, causing discounts etc.

        AV

        Comment


        • #5
          AV, you could offer this price list?

          Comment


          • #6
            For what little it may be worth today:
            A few years ago, in the middle of, and in response to, the Great Recession or Depression or whatever that was called, Johannus was offering special pricing: a 3-manual for ~$20K and a 4-manual for something like $25K.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by NoTalent View Post
              For what little it may be worth today:
              A few years ago, in the middle of, and in response to, the Great Recession or Depression or whatever that was called, Johannus was offering special pricing: a 3-manual for ~$20K and a 4-manual for something like $25K.
              The four manual Rembrandt was 24,995. The cheapest three manual Opus was 9,995! Prices did not include delivery, installation, etc.

              - - - Updated - - -

              Comment


              • #8
                Don't I remember that the Roland Classic C-series organs (non-Rodgers cheapy boxen) were less than $20K new recently?
                -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic -- 1899 Kimball, Rodgers W5000C, Conn 643, Hammond M3, L-102 - “If music be the food of love, play on" Shakespeare, Twelfth Night

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by JRCA View Post
                  I always had the curiosity to know what the prices of digital organs practiced in the US.

                  I found a brochure on the internet that speaks a Rodgers Infinity 484 is costing close to US $ 200,000.00 is this price right?

                  You do realize that a seriously large pipe organ of similar capability would be in the $2 Million dollar range if done by a firm like Wicks and possibly double that if done by a high prestige firm like Schoenstein and Sons? Allen and Rodgers have far superior construction and mechanical reliability, to the European digitals which offer more voices and features at a given price point. Unfortunately even Allen and Rodgers are using electronic sub-systems manufactured elsewhere and these fail even though the overall sturdiness of the console cannot be faulted.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Leisesturm View Post
                    Unfortunately even Allen and Rodgers are using electronic sub-systems manufactured elsewhere and these fail even though the overall sturdiness of the console cannot be faulted.
                    What "sub-systems" are Allen using that are built elsewhere? According to the history of Allen Organs as a company, this is all they are involved in:

                    Principal Subsidiaries: Allen Audio, Inc.; Legacy Audio, Inc.; Linear Switch Corp.; Eastern Research Inc.

                    Principal Divisions: Allen Integrated Assemblies; VIR Linear Switches.

                    Principal Operating Units: Musical Instruments; Data Communications; Electronic Assemblies; Audio Equipment.

                    http://www.fundinguniverse.com/compa...mpany-history/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a pair of Legacy audio speakers and they are excellent. However, they are old and may be a pre-Allen product.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Leisesturm View Post
                        Unfortunately even Allen and Rodgers are using electronic sub-systems manufactured elsewhere and these fail even though the overall sturdiness of the console cannot be faulted.
                        I think the largest bit of the price is the construction. Electronic components are CHEAP these days.

                        Someone told me last year that there is/was a $50k or so difference between having lighted stops and mechanical stops on an Infinity 484
                        Allen MOS 1105 (1982)
                        Allen ADC 5000 (1985) w/ MDS Expander II (drawer unit)
                        Henry Reinich Pipe 2m/29ranks (1908)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by organman95 View Post
                          Someone told me last year that there is/was a $50k or so difference between having lighted stops and mechanical stops on an Infinity 484
                          I would understand $25,000 - but not $50,000. I do not know how many stops/couplers an Infinity 484 has; but the labor to install the mechanical system versus the lighted system should not be too much more. I get the feeling that there is an additional luxury markup on the mechanical system if it actually is an additional $50,000.

                          If one contacted Harris, Klann, Peterson, Syndyne, etc. their prices would be more in the area of $25,000 than $50,000.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The notion that electronic components are cheap (i.e., low cost) is absurd. Electronic components are a mature product (in general) and pricing/costs tend to do up with the increased costs of raw materials. Many of the raw materials are increasing substantially, including copper the most basic of raw materials for electrical and electronic components.

                            It is true that very manufacturers of very high volume consumer products operate on very thin margins and so it appears the electronics are low cost, but this is not true of electronics in general. It is especially not the case for very low volume specialty production items like organs.

                            I blame the cell phone industry for this erroneous impression--they give their cell phones away (practically) even though they probably cost a hundred dollars or much more to manufacture, and by bundling them with the recurring cost of service make it seem like they are "free".

                            As to mechanical drawknobs, Syndyne sells their drawknob motor in the range of $25 to 30 each. But the stems, heads, and engraving increase the cost to about $35. But each drawknob has to be mounted individually, and aligned, so there is a lot more labor in mechanical drawknobs over say, a lighted rocker panel, where a group of 10 to 20 might be mounted on a single assembly.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              "toodles" -
                              "As to mechanical drawknobs, Syndyne sells their drawknob motor in the range of $25 to 30 each."

                              So, as to compare, do you know what the price is for a lighted drawknob?

                              When you say "motor", do you mean a drawknob with a motor or a drawknob that is effectively driven by solenoid?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X