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  • Rodgers 330tm

    Does anyone know if the Rodgers 330tm used Laukhuff keyboards?

    Thanks
    Bryan
    =÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=
    Magnus Europa, 4 manuals, 112 stops - church sanctuary
    Hauptwerk 3 manual, converted from Rodgers 330 - home
    Rodgers Allegiant 677- church chapel

  • #2
    According to the Rodgers tech site it had Herberger-Brooks keyboards.
    The website also has this note: "This information is accurate to the best of our knowledge. Depending on the organ model and its date of manufacturer, an organ could have varying keyboard styles."

    td
    Servicing electronic organs since 1969.

    Comment


    • #3
      Herberger-Brooks is correct--these are English, and pretty much the standard Rodgers wooden core keyboard from early days until they switched to Laukhuff. The sharps are plastic, but they are very nice keyboards. The 330 console is 40 inches deep, in case you were considering moving one of these into a house, that poses a problem unless you have double doors.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the info! I am considering picking one of these up just for the keyboards.
        Bryan
        =÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=
        Magnus Europa, 4 manuals, 112 stops - church sanctuary
        Hauptwerk 3 manual, converted from Rodgers 330 - home
        Rodgers Allegiant 677- church chapel

        Comment


        • #5
          That's a whole lot of organ to throw out just to get the keyboards!

          Comment


          • #6
            Oh I don't mean that all else will be thrown out! With nice keyboards and moving stop tabs, it will make for a nice Hauptwerk conversion!
            Bryan
            =÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=
            Magnus Europa, 4 manuals, 112 stops - church sanctuary
            Hauptwerk 3 manual, converted from Rodgers 330 - home
            Rodgers Allegiant 677- church chapel

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by bbierbaum View Post
              Oh I don't mean that all else will be thrown out! With nice keyboards and moving stop tabs, it will make for a nice Hauptwerk conversion!
              Glad to hear that!

              Comment


              • #8
                I will be picking this instrument up in 2 weeks. Does anyone happen to know if the keyboards use a matrix or common bus wiring? What about the pedalboard?
                Bryan
                =÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=
                Magnus Europa, 4 manuals, 112 stops - church sanctuary
                Hauptwerk 3 manual, converted from Rodgers 330 - home
                Rodgers Allegiant 677- church chapel

                Comment


                • #9
                  The keying is parallel--each key contacts a common bus. This is the case for the manuals and the pedals. The organ does use a multiplexer system for transposer and coupler purposes, but this is done with 61 notes in parallel feeding the time share (multiplexer) system.

                  If your concern is adding MIDI--it's very easy to do with this organ.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks! I just wanted to have an idea to figure out exactly which encoders will be needed.
                    Bryan
                    =÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=
                    Magnus Europa, 4 manuals, 112 stops - church sanctuary
                    Hauptwerk 3 manual, converted from Rodgers 330 - home
                    Rodgers Allegiant 677- church chapel

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Like all early Rodgers consoles, you'll find a single buss under each keyboard, and an individual wire running from each key's contact whisker to the ganging board. All lined up in order from 1 to 61. Should be really easy to convert to MIDI. I once put MIDI on one manual of an old 660 from about the same era. All the key contact wires terminated on this large flat vertical board in one of the swing-out racks, and all I had to do was split the ribbon cables into individual wires and solder them directly to the lines running horizontally across that board. I got MIDI out, which I used to drive a computer running J-Organ, and the original analog stops still worked too.

                      Those old organs are probably about the easiest to wire to an outboard MIDI converter. But consult the schematic to make sure you are tapping into the voltage you want to drive your converter. The one I did gave +12 volts on key-down, which was perfect for my converter. As I recall, I could've attached the wires in one area to get just the one manual's keying, or in another spot I could've had my MIDI stops follow the inter-divisional couplers. Of course you don't want that in most MIDI setups because coupling is going to be done by the computer.
                      John
                      ----------
                      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks John!
                        Bryan
                        =÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=
                        Magnus Europa, 4 manuals, 112 stops - church sanctuary
                        Hauptwerk 3 manual, converted from Rodgers 330 - home
                        Rodgers Allegiant 677- church chapel

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I am posting link to the SAM's for this organ. Does anyone know who made these? Did Rodgers male them or were the outsourced?
                          Also, does anyone happen to know what each color wire does...which is the on coil, off coil, etc...?

                          https://www.dropbox.com/s/z1dk4iauwg...73039.jpg?dl=0


                          Thanks!
                          Bryan
                          =÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=÷=
                          Magnus Europa, 4 manuals, 112 stops - church sanctuary
                          Hauptwerk 3 manual, converted from Rodgers 330 - home
                          Rodgers Allegiant 677- church chapel

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi,

                            These SAMs were made by Syndyne. These units had some kind of foam stops for the up and down positions. This foam deteriorates over time so the tabs feel sticky when pushed on. Especially so if units were made in the late 70s or early 80s. According to Syndyne, no good solution exists.

                            AV
                            Last edited by arie v; 02-13-2017, 08:57 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              As Arie mentioned, these were manufactured by Syndyne--they are still in business and have a website, Syndyne.com.

                              I don't have the color code for the SAMs, but I have it for the Syndyne drawknob units that Rodgers used at the same time, and I suspect the color code is the same.

                              Brown: Output 1 (see below)
                              Yellow: Off Coil
                              Purple: Output 2 (see below)
                              Green: On Coil
                              Red: Common, Positive 15 volts (see below)

                              There might be one or 2 output wires, so if brown or purple is missing, that's probably OK.
                              Common has 2 wires (usually) but connected together.

                              On the SAM units the solid wires that run through the circuit board and are soldered to all the SAMs are conductors--looks like one of them replaces the Common (red)--I'm not sure if the other is also common or not, based on your pictures, but probably is.

                              The up & down stops that Arie mentioned where a synthetic rubber called Poron--it turns sticky over time, and I don't recall if that is because it self-deteriorates over time or if it is attacked by a fungus. The cure is to replace all those little pads with felt. If you stops are sluggish or hesitant to move--sticky-- they you have the problem. Syndyne will replace the pads at a rework cost, but you have to unmount and disconnect all the tabs. You could, of course just order the pads yourself and do the work, but the big part of the job is removing the mechanisms and replacing them.

                              A short to moderate term fix is to use toilet paper--put TP on the up stop and down stop, work the tab a few times. The stickiness of the Poron will make the TP fibers adhere to the pad, and keep things working for a while. I haven't done this, so I don't know how long it lasts, but it is a lot easier than removing the mechanisms and reinstalling them after rework.

                              As far as I know, no one has found a sealant to cure the surface of the pads to remove the stickiness.

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