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Further adventures of an organ savior – ADC-5300-D Part I

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  • Further adventures of an organ savior – ADC-5300-D Part I

    Sometimes it pays to be curious. I check the local Craigslist each evening and search for the word “organ” in the general search. (I found that you miss some interesting items if you just go to the musical instrument section.) Ten days ago I saw a listing for two organs (no brand names in the headline) and the lead photo was a dark picture of an instrument with the roll top closed.

    Looking at the next few photos I saw that one of the organs was an older Baldwin church organ and the other one was an… ADC-5300-D! The person posting the ad had actually photographed the nameplate. It was late at night so I waited until 7:45AM the next morning to text the poster. I got an immediate response and arranged to inspect the instrument the next day.

    I called the Allen factory and found out that it had been built in 1988 and had shipped with 9 speakers. He wasn’t sure what the –D meant and later told me that it was a more robust console. (That turned out not to be the case so I’m not sure what it means. The console is 35.5” deep.)

    The location was in a former Methodist church that had been purchased by a regional mega-church that currently has their Denver congregation meeting in our downtown 1931 art-deco movie palace. This will be their 3rd permanent location and they have eventual plans for 2 more locations. They currently have 35,000 members.

    The organ console was in the choir area and construction had already started on the remodeling of the building so there were workmen all around. The roll top was locked and they could not find the key! I opened the back and the inside of the instrument was not too dirty at all. It did seem to have a very large number (5) of antiphonal relay cards inside.

    I then asked the person representing the church about the speakers. “Speakers? What speakers?”

    I explained that there would be some number of large brown boxes with speakers. That began the next part of the adventure. There were large architectural structures with grille cloth on each side of the recessed area where the lighted cross was located. They were large enough to house a pipe organ on several levels.

    I found a pull-down stairway in a room near the choir space and discovered six speakers in a room about 10’ x 10’. There were five HC-15s, one HC-12 and three more antiphonal relay cards. Of course then I was curious about finding the other three speakers that Allen told me about.

    We searched for about 15 minutes and finally discovered a small hatch above the toilet in a very small bathroom near the former pastor’s office. I got a ladder and flashlight and first saw lots of air conditioning ducts and fans. Then I saw SIX more speakers.

    The church said to make them an offer on the speakers since they did not know they existed and the price for the organ was for the console only. I went home and contacted the local Allen organ service man. He had installed the instrument and told me that there were six more speakers in the balcony.

    At that point I contacted John Birdsong (jbird604) in Arkansas for advice on how much to offer for the speakers. John was very helpful (on this and other questions I had) and the church accepted my offer. They also told me that I’d better get the organ out quickly because the sound and lighting guys were starting to pull cable and the organ speaker cables were in the way. The Allen service man had recommended an experienced organ mover and he agreed to move the organ on Wednesday.

    In the mean time I went back to the church to figure out where the balcony speakers were located. I took my Little Giant folding ladder just in case. There was a large, imposing architectural structure on the back wall of the balcony that matched the ones at the front of the church with similar grille cloth. I finally found some hinges and then some screws and opened up the doors on the front of the structure.

    And, it was empty! But there were two more doors at the top of the structure so I unfolded the ladder and climbed up to take a look. I removed one more screw but could not get the doors to open – they were still attached at the top. That was about 20 feet above the floor and my ladder and courage were too short for that excursion. But I did pull out the bottom of the door enough to shine a flashlight up inside and confirmed there was another set of six speakers in there.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Further adventures of an organ savior – ADC-5300-D Part II

    In the mean time I tried to get a key for the console. I really wanted to see if it worked before writing the check. But the Allen factory would not sell me a key – I had to go through their tech (who was out of town) or their local sales agent. I bought one from the sales agent, who promised to get it out when he returned from his out of town trip. Then I got a call from the church’s agent saying that the sound guys had to cut speaker cables to get them out of the way of their new A/V cables so testing the organ in situ was no longer possible.

    I went to the church on Wednesday and disconnected the cables from the two sets of speakers at the front of the room. The sound guys helped me salvage as much speaker wire as I could; some it was abandoned in place because it was too difficult to get to. I’m 69, 6’3 and 225 pounds and did not enjoy climbing up into the ceiling over the toilet and over the air conditioning ducts to disconnect the right chamber speakers but I had to make sure that they could be removed since some of the AC had been put in after the organ speakers.

    (By the way, this new church is putting in over $200,000 worth of sound system and lighting but they have, you guessed it, a praise band at each location.)

    The movers arrived at shortly after 5PM (I was their second job of the day) and I was impressed with how hard they worked to get the two front sets of speakers out. They then got the console lifted up out of its shallow pit. Unfortunately the door at the handicapped ramp was only 33” wide so they had to take the console down the front steps of the church.

    We put up two folding ladders in the “A” configuration for them to safely remove the six balcony antiphonal speakers from their 12 foot perch. They then delivered it all to my temporary heated storage space, which is connected to a friend’s player piano workshop. I used the air compressor to blow as much of the accumulated dirt and grime off the speaker cabinets as I could. Total time for the move (including some traffic): 3.5 hours. No damage to the console or speakers in the move. I was impressed and gave all three guys nice tips.

    On Thursday I opened the overhead door (despite our first real snow storm of the season) and used the air compressor to blow the dirt out of the console and washed the grime off the exterior of six of the speaker cabinets. I sorted through all of the salvaged speaker cable and hooked up six lines from the console to five HC-15s and one HC-12. I went home to get the mail, presuming that the key I purchased (for an outrageous amount of money) would be there. Nada. It was mailed on Tuesday evening from south Denver.

    So today (Friday) I ran errands and did other work until the mail came and there was the key!!! I rushed back to the shop and opened the roll top. My heart sank. Someone evidently had spilled a can of cola on the roll top and it leaked down over the stops and keys. I must admit that my first thought was not very charitable – that someone from the church saw that and then conveniently lost the console key so the buyer would not see it.

    I turned on the organ hit a piston and played some notes on each manual (the console is currently sitting on two moving dollies so the pedalboard is not attached) and was delighted to hear musical notes! Every manual stop worked, as did the rest of the controls. There were two stuck keys on the swell and one on the great, so I’m guessing the cola got down into the keyboards there. I cleaned up the stop tabs and keys with a damp rag. Ah, much better.

    The drawer on the right side of the console turned out to have 27 alterable voice cards, many of which look like the perfect addition to the stop list for my musical taste. I put one in the card reader but did not get any results. There are 11 lights visible in the reader (the second row down from the top is dark but I don’t think that channel is used). I checked the CR voltage; it was 4.6 Volts so I bumped it up to 5.0 Volts. But that didn’t help. What is the correct voltage for this?

    I did check the alterable voice card for battery leakage before I bought the organ and it looked fine. The combination action memory still had the previous organist’s combinations, so that battery is still OK but I will change both of them and remove them from the cards.

    I then played a few short pieces, using the existing combinations and I really do like the sound of the instrument. Tomorrow I’ll make a temporary support for the pedalboard so I can hear that famous 32’ Contre Bombarde that everyone gets excited about on here.

    Now that I am mostly retired, I am getting ready to sell my home of 26 years in Denver and move over to the western side of the state. It is a daunting endeavor. At times I have felt overwhelmed with the magnitude of the project. But this new instrument gives me something wonderful to look forward to in the music room of my new home. With 18 speakers, it will certainly make a joyful noise. And now I can part with some of my older instruments like the Saville and the Allen MOS-1 without any regrets at all.

    I never expected to own an ADC organ so even though I’ve read many of the threads about them on here, I did not retain the information due to lack of relevance. So now I need to do some searches and learn more about troubleshooting the card reader.

    Any advice on getting a copy of the combination action key without paying another $19?
    Last edited by AllenAnalog; 11-19-2016, 01:03 AM.
    Larry is my name; Allen is an organ brand. Allen RMWTHEA.3 with RMI Electra-Piano; Allen 423-C+Gyro; Britson Opus OEM38; Steinway AR Duo-Art 7' grand piano, Mills Violano Virtuoso with MIDI; Hammond 9812H with roll player; Roland E-200; Mason&Hamlin AR Ampico grand piano, Allen ADC-5300-D with MIDI, Allen MADC-2110.

  • #2
    I think if you do a search on "card reader" you'll find several threads that include information on what voltage the power supply should make. The ADC card reader has lamps for all but the 11-row of the card (2nd down from the top edge)--the 12-row (top) is (I think) just used to tell the reader that a card has been inserted and withdrawn; rows 0-3 and 5-8 constitute 2 halves of an 8-bit binary code; row 4 has a row of 33 consecutive punches that are used to "clock" the data into the memory; and row 9 (bottom) has some control punches that define what pitch register should be used for the stop. (The "clock" punches are to allow for a value of zero (no punches in rows 0-3 and 5-8) to be specified; row 8 is the "sign" bit for the binary code, row 7 is the most significant bit (MSB) and row 0 is the least significant bit (LSB).

    I'm pretty sure jbird will probably recommend that you carefully disconnect the cable from the card reader, apply a thin film of petroleum jelly to the exposed contacts, and then reconnect. This, plus getting the voltage right might just get the reader to working.

    If you have lots of free time (or have insomnia) there is a 45-page thread on Allen Tone Cards that will tell you just about anything you might be curious about concerning them: http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...len+tone+cards. A much shorter thread is here: http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...len+tone+cards. And this 7-page thread specifically for ADC organs: http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...len+tone+cards.

    I must confess that I was a significant contributor to those threads, so am probably a little biased.

    David

    Comment


    • #3
      Larry,

      Sounds like a lot of GOOD news! Thanks for reporting. The card reader voltage is normally around 8 volts, so it sounds like it has been set way too low. Bump it up to 8 and see what happens. The lamps are 12 volt lamps, but are run on lower voltage to give them a very long lifetime. If all the lamps are burning and there is no dust or trash in the reader, it may well work. If not, the trouble could be the reader (bad photo cells or other issues, though rare) or the USAV card in the cage.

      The sticky keys may require you to remove them and clean out the soda residue, but it shouldn't be too hard. A plastic nut under the front of each key holds it down, and there is also a spring at the rear underneath the wooden keystick, but you might not have to remove the spring just to raise the key enough to scrape off the dried coke syrup.

      Keep on posting. This is an amazing find!
      John
      ----------
      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

      Comment


      • #4
        Congratulations on the find and on saving a nice instrument!

        See my private message regarding the combination action key. As to the D console, this console is indeed about 35.5 inches deep, so you got it right. The C console is the even larger console that is about 43 inches deep (from memory), with paneled sides. It's hard to get that one in a house, but the D console is easier.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks to everyone for their help and advice. This forum is really incredible. I am amazed at how many members of the 5300 owners club there are on here. I went back to read Hamman’s 5300 thread and really liked his scrimmed speaker arrays. I just acquired two sets of Conn pipes, one big and one small, so perhaps my eventual speaker layout will copy some ideas from his stunning installation.

          I had time to go over to the shop on Saturday and work on the organ. I raised the voltage on the card reader to 8.0 Volts and it works perfectly. I had a grand time testing all 27 cards. I’ll find the sweet voltage spot on the reader when I have more time and some help.

          To echo JBird’s comment about his new Viscount, I am falling in love with this organ. I like the stop list and the alterable voices, Celeste Tuning and Romantic Tuning all make the instrument sound really sweet. I had remembered a number of old threads praising the sound of this organ and I totally agree. Yes, I wish it were a 3-manual and had the brass choir option but then I think about what those 18 speakers will sound like and I get over it.

          And that high praise is without being able to attach the pedalboard and sit on the bench. It turns out that the way the dollies are placed under each end of the console, the lower front concave bracket is resting on the dollies, preventing it from dropping down into the grooves. (I had the back of the pedalboard propped up with a stack of 3 2x4s.) When my friend figures out where we will put the console to store it until I have my new house, I’ll get some help to get it off the dollies. It is way too heavy for me to lift by myself.

          It did scare the daylights out of me – I forgot I had the organ on when I lowered the organ end of the pedalboard and the magnets must have all engaged. There were some pedal stops on and the resulting sound was quite stunning to say the least! I’m guessing I hit the 12 note polyphony limit because none of the manual keys worked at that point (once I turned off the pedal stops).

          My next project was to do a survey of the stop tabs and compare that with the published spec sheet. There were some differences; I’ve got the chimes instead of the 8’ Hautbois.

          The general tab used for Swell 2nd Voicing on other instruments that I’ve seen on here controlled a special second set of antiphonal relays that were used to cut off the speakers above above the pastor’s office during organ practice. Is there any way to get the 2nd voicing function to work again? It is shown as a standard feature in the 5300 spec sheet but I don’t know how that would have been wired to the cage. Any thoughts?
          Larry is my name; Allen is an organ brand. Allen RMWTHEA.3 with RMI Electra-Piano; Allen 423-C+Gyro; Britson Opus OEM38; Steinway AR Duo-Art 7' grand piano, Mills Violano Virtuoso with MIDI; Hammond 9812H with roll player; Roland E-200; Mason&Hamlin AR Ampico grand piano, Allen ADC-5300-D with MIDI, Allen MADC-2110.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by AllenAnalog View Post
            It did scare the daylights out of me – I forgot I had the organ on when I lowered the organ end of the pedalboard and the magnets must have all engaged. There were some pedal stops on and the resulting sound was quite stunning to say the least! I’m guessing I hit the 12 note polyphony limit because none of the manual keys worked at that point (once I turned off the pedal stops).
            Allen,

            What I'm impressed by is the fact you recognized the organ had a 12 note polyphony and didn't panic at the keyboard not working. I suspect that's exactly what happened. It's like the time I lost a caster from the front of the organ just before a symphony rehearsal. I turned the organ on, and heard the pedal notes ciphering, and panicked. It took a few minutes to narrow down the notes and to realize they were all on one end of the keyboard, and then to discover that lifting the end of the organ fixed the issues. A few wadded-up paper towels later, and I played the concert--wadded-up paper towels intact. Fortunately, they were on the up-stage side of the organ!

            You got the Chimes!!! WOW! You won't even miss the Hautbois in the Swell. You can always get it back with an Alterable or MIDI (Allen's Alterable Reeds have always been good), but I've yet to run into an Alterable version of Allen's Chimes I liked--even with the Beta card reader on one of my organs. They just aren't the same.

            One more word on the pedals. I just replaced a couple of Pedal reed switches, and I never realized before that the magnet will work both above AND below the center point. On my ADC-4300, one or two of the pedal notes sound when I let up on them. I never realized before that it's because the released pedal is going ABOVE the center point, rather than bouncing down and playing again that way. I'm not sure your organ will have that issue, but if it does, just be aware the pedal adjustment could be either above OR below, thereby causing the issue.

            Best of luck with your new acquisition and the impending move. From my experiences with my 4300, I know you'll enjoy the organ--the pick of the litter!

            Michael
            Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
            • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
            • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
            • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

            Comment


            • #7
              Larry, that 2nd voicing tab probably just had its wire clipped off and the contact used to trigger those remote relays. You might find the loose end of the original wire somewhere in the area of the tab and you will only have to re-attach it where it is supposed to be. "2nd voice" is a cage function, controlled via the stop map EPROM on the USCM board, so there isn't any way (AFAIK) to trigger the second voices except with the tab properly connected. If you have trouble figuring it out, I might be able to find the original wiring diagram on the Allen tech site. However, as I may have mentioned before, tech data on the 5300 is scarce for some reason.
              John
              ----------
              *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

              https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm sure some of us would be interested in hearing a recording of your organ if you're able and have time!
                Viscount C400 3-manual
                8 channels + 2 reverb channels (w/ Lexicon MX200)
                Klipsch RSX-3 speakers and Klipsch Ultra 5.1 subwoofers

                Comment


                • #9
                  The wire might also have been clipped at the REMOUT connection on the multiplexer board, with the REMOUT wire connected to a relay (or relay driver) board. Check for a spare wire around the multiplexer board.

                  REMOUT=Remote Output.

                  The multiplexer board is on the right hand (as you face the back of the organ--the bass end) swing-out panel above the cage. You have to swing open that panel to get to it.

                  Generally the ADC 2nd voicing on the classical organs seems to have been to route all the flutes into one channel so that a Vibrato (heavy trem) could be applied for theatrical/gospel effect. The voicing changes might be pretty subtle, though it probably killed most articulation.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for the suggestions. I have three more sets of questions, which I will post separately.

                    I want to understand the function of all of the circuit boards inside the organ. I've done some searches on here (I sure wish this site had a WIKI so all of the vast amount of knowledge posted here was easier to find) and here's the list so far:

                    BTW, I was happy to see that the power supply in the cage was a USPS-3, so it evidently is the latest rev of that board.

                    Looking inside the back of the organ, on the inside of the left hinged panel:

                    USRM-8 board: This is obviously the mixer board for the reverb. It looks like a 7-channel board with 7 input pots (more about that later). Is there any documentation for the four DIP switches on the board?

                    Click image for larger version

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                    ADR-4: The reverb unit. I did find a two page setup document in the cage chart folder for this device so I know what the pots and DIP switches do.

                    Next to that inside the organ:

                    Bass Lift (2): It has cables marked 2A and 6A in and 2B and 6B out. Why channels 2 and 6?

                    On outside of the right hinged panel:

                    USCP-2: The combination action memory. I need to replace and remote the battery.

                    USRD-1: I gather this is a relay driver board – is it for the speaker antiphonal relays?

                    USSC-2: What does this board do?

                    Click image for larger version

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                    On the inside of the right hinged panel:

                    USMC-2: What functions are on this board? It has two unpopulated EPROM sockets, and three with chips installed - one labeled SM53-1 Chimes, one labeled CM53 and one labeled CR53. If they replace the Hautbois stop with the chimes stop, why didn’t they just put the chimes EPROM on the TG-8 card in slot 21 of the card cage in place of the Hautbois chip? Does this board do something special with that chimes waveform data? And what do the other two EPROMs do?

                    Click image for larger version

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                    Larry is my name; Allen is an organ brand. Allen RMWTHEA.3 with RMI Electra-Piano; Allen 423-C+Gyro; Britson Opus OEM38; Steinway AR Duo-Art 7' grand piano, Mills Violano Virtuoso with MIDI; Hammond 9812H with roll player; Roland E-200; Mason&Hamlin AR Ampico grand piano, Allen ADC-5300-D with MIDI, Allen MADC-2110.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Larry,

                      I'll stretch my memory a bit and see if I can answer some of your questions. My last trip to the Allen factory was just before the end of the ADC era, and some things changed at that point, but I'll do my best.

                      USRM-3 is the reverb mixer, as you guess, designed to handle up to seven audio channels going through. The seven pots regulate how much of each of the seven input channels gets injected into the reverb. Normally these are all set the same. On the left are the RCA inputs. Six from your six cage outputs, two more are the returns from the reverb unit. The one that is unused (with a shorting plug) would be from a seventh cage output if there were one. On the right are the RCA outputs. Six of them go on to the six audio amps, the seventh is the mono mix that goes to the reverb unit input. The unused one would go to a seventh amp if the organ had one. The four DIP switches are for combining channels, as when using fewer than the normal number of amps/speakers. Since your organ has all its required amps, these switches should all be off.

                      Bass Lift is a tiny dedicated and preset bass-boosting circuit added to certain channels to compensate for the slight bass inadequacy of HC-15 speakers. Not all channels need this, just the ones that carry stops that would be affected by the dip in bass output near the low end of its range. The effect is subtle, and you have to wonder why Allen didn't just let us compensate with the Bass pots on the TG boards. But the engineers thought this little board was needed, so we have it.

                      USRD is necessary for driving relays because the USCM board that handles most other console functions can't pass through enough current to drive as many antiphonal relays as a large organ like that requires. Smaller models don't use the USRD if they have only one relay in the system.

                      USSC-2 is a little board which serves (best I recall) only one obscure function -- to disable celeste tuning when the crescendo pedal is in use. It's like they forgot to program that function into the system and had to invent a little add-on board to do it.

                      USCM-2 is the "console multiplexer." The control center of the system, the board that interfaces with all the various console hardware such as keyswitches, stop switches, expression and crescendo pedals, card reader, etc. This incoming data is converted to a stream that is sent to the cage on a round data cable, thus instructing the cage to create and process all the sounds of the organ.

                      The USCM has various EPROMs. The "SM53-1" on one EPROM stands for "stop map of a model 5300" and it tells the cage that you have a chime stop in place of the hautbois. Even though the EPROM in the cage stores the wave information for the chimes, the system needs to "know" that there is a chime tab. I'm guessing that this EPROM directs the system to turn on percussion when that tab is drawn, which would not be done is that tab were the hautbois.

                      CR53 = the crescendo sequence for a 5300. Each model has its own crescendo sequence of course. The other EPROM, CM53, is probably just a set of general instructions that adapt the universal USCM-2 to the specific needs of the 5300. The empty sockets would be populated on a USCM in a larger instrument or if there were custom modifications that needed instructions sent to the cage.
                      John
                      ----------
                      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The USSC in addition to cutting the celeste tuning also should cut-out the trem stops. This organ was designed when Dwight Beacham was in Allen's engineering department (probably the head of that department), and Dwight is an excellent theatre organist. His designs usually incorporated things needed or "prepared for" a theatre organ in addition to the requirements of a classical instrument. While you would want to cut off trems on the Crescendo on a classical organ, you would never want to do this on a theatre organ, so perhaps this was done externally from the cage to allow it to be disabled if desired. A church which used a lot of gospel music might also prefer not to have the trems cut-off from the crescendo sequence.

                        I've noticed in your album photos that this 5300 does not have the Trem boards installed for "vibrato"--these would be on the left hand swing out panel and visible with just the back off. These used Trem 3 or Trem 4 boards, which were bucket-brigade phase shift trem for FM in combination with AM trem done on the same board. These are audio line-level processors.

                        The gospel 2nd voicing for the swell would typically have been chosen as an option with trems installed, at least on the Swell, so you may not have the 2nd voicing on this organ. It was an option. There was also a classical 2nd voicing for the swell and that wouldn't necessitate trems. In short, your organ may not have the 2nd voicing installed.

                        Allen was just getting into 2nd voicing during the late ADC era, culminating with complete classical 2nd voices on their theatre models. It wasn't until MDS when it got strongly integrated into the classical models.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Great information on the more obscure functions of the boards. Thanks you! Now to the question of fixing the binding keys on both manuals. I can see that the first step would be to remove the roll top by taking out the stop screws. I also see that there are hinge pins and long brackets for the stop board and hinges for the manuals.

                          So what are the next steps to open up the organ to access the manuals so I can examine the individual keys? Do I have to disconnect any wiring? Which screws need to be removed?
                          Larry is my name; Allen is an organ brand. Allen RMWTHEA.3 with RMI Electra-Piano; Allen 423-C+Gyro; Britson Opus OEM38; Steinway AR Duo-Art 7' grand piano, Mills Violano Virtuoso with MIDI; Hammond 9812H with roll player; Roland E-200; Mason&Hamlin AR Ampico grand piano, Allen ADC-5300-D with MIDI, Allen MADC-2110.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            There should be hold down screws to keep the swell keyboard tied down. These are long screws that come up from the bottom of the keydesk through clearance holes in the great key cheeks and screw into the swell key cheeks. If you look at the bottom of the keydesk (sit/lie on the floor and look up--a flashlight is probably needed) you see them. You could also feel for them under the keydesk.

                            There should also be hold down screws (different ones) for the great keyboard if you need to raise it also.

                            Most all the other things you need to remove are obvious.

                            You do not need to remove any wiring to access the manuals, but there might be a cable clamp or two that need to be unscrewed to permit the cables to flex.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Allen,

                              Just a quick caution, though. Be aware of where the back, hinged parts of the keyboards are as you lift. If you have not removed the back, or opened some of the doors inside the back of the organ, you could cause some damage. If I recall correctly, there is no limit to how far back the keyboards will swing (until they reach the back rail, cage, or amplifiers.

                              Michael
                              Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                              • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                              • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                              • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

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