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What model Allen organ is this?

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  • radagast
    replied
    Originally posted by AllenAnalog View Post
    The TC-1 was introduced in 1958 and the Barnes article in The Diapason was published in the April, 1958 issue. So was North Austin vacuum tube technology? Anyone have a copy of that issue of the Diapason to scan the article?

    We've discussed this instrument in Sacramento before, but in looking at the multiple photos of the generator racks, how many generators do you think this one had? (I find it interesting that after 8 years the video of this organ is still drawing new comments.)

    http://s862.photobucket.com/user/Del...962CustomAllen

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuVcJAGR4eI



    At about 5:00, the organist states that although there are 67 stops, only about 45 will sound at any one time, which makes it sound like it has 45 separate tone generators. It's a shame the organ couldn't find a home. It's quite an amazing achievement. It's even more amazing that Allen didn't learn anything from this era regarding multiple sound channels and generators when they first entered the digital era. It took companies like Marshall & Ogletree to get Allen to use interleaved audio etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • m&m's
    replied
    I had the opportunity several years ago to buy a number of old Allen organs from someone who had been keeping them for a man who never came back for them. After ten years of waiting the owner of the storage space decided he had waited long enough. I passed on the opportunity, not having any space at the time to take them, but occasionally wish I had acquired them. There were several TC-4s, two TC-6's and four or five of the smaller models. It would have been quite a challenge, but I would love to have put together an organ such as the above Allen.

    Leave a comment:


  • m&m's
    replied
    Originally posted by AllenAnalog View Post
    The TC-1 was introduced in 1958 and the Barnes article in The Diapason was published in the April, 1958 issue. So was North Austin vacuum tube technology? Anyone have a copy of that issue of the Diapason to scan the article?

    We've discussed this instrument in Sacramento before, but in looking at the multiple photos of the generator racks, how many generators do you think this one had? (I find it interesting that after 8 years the video of this organ is still drawing new comments.)

    http://s862.photobucket.com/user/Del...962CustomAllen

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuVcJAGR4eI



    The First Baptist Church in Columbia SC had an organ very similar to the one referred to. It was installed some time in the 1950's. I got to play it in the early 70's when I visited my friends there, and, for a country boy who had never played one that large, it was quite an exciting experience to play it in an auditorium that seated about a thousand. I understand that the room that held the generator racks put out quite a bit of heat, and needed special air conditioning in the summer. When the church built a new auditorium that seated over three thousand, they installed a new pipe organ in it. The Allen was failing by then, and was removed and replaced by a new digital that was nowhere near the organ that the Allen was (I won't name the brand, but it did not stay long, even though the old auditorium was now only being used for special services like funerals, etc. It was replaced by another brand that was much better.)

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  • MarkS
    replied
    North Austin Lutheran was vacuum tube.

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  • AllenAnalog
    replied
    The TC-1 was introduced in 1958 and the Barnes article in The Diapason was published in the April, 1958 issue. So was North Austin vacuum tube technology? Anyone have a copy of that issue of the Diapason to scan the article?

    We've discussed this instrument in Sacramento before, but in looking at the multiple photos of the generator racks, how many generators do you think this one had? (I find it interesting that after 8 years the video of this organ is still drawing new comments.)

    http://s862.photobucket.com/user/Del...962CustomAllen

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuVcJAGR4eI



    Last edited by AllenAnalog; 07-01-2018, 09:08 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • rjsilva
    replied
    Seller confirmed there are external racks.

    Leave a comment:


  • beel m
    replied
    Originally posted by MarkS View Post
    North Austin Lutheran's Allen was three manuals with twenty-four claimed generators and a troublesome Reisner-type remote combination action. It was destroyed by fire in 1985. The above-mentioned salesperson said that the repair technicians missed it...
    So, if that's true, then the top three transistor analog Allens were: 1. Tenth Pres Phila (26G) 2. Phila Divinity School (25G) (both organs were installed in 1970 and both are gone) and 3. North Austin Lutheran (24G) I'm assuming it was solid-state; you didn't mention that
    1. and 2. had an Allen solid-state capture action, not the Reisner or the NAR, the only two Allen built. It is my understanding that both were, um, temperamental.

    R, Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • rjsilva
    replied
    I asked the seller if there were any external racks. I’m not sure if they will respond though because I also said I wasn’t interested in the organ (though I wouldn’t mind snagging parts like the pedalboard and amps and/or tubes if they’d otherwise just go in the trash).

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkS
    replied
    North Austin Lutheran's Allen was three manuals with twenty-four claimed generators and a troublesome Reisner-type remote combination action. It was destroyed by fire in 1985. The above-mentioned salesperson said that the repair technicians missed it...

    Leave a comment:


  • AllenAnalog
    replied
    Since the first Allen I ever played was a W-5S, I always find it interesting to read more about these large old analog tube instruments. I found my 1959 edition of Barnes and was fascinated to see how much he wrote about the Stamford (and similar) instruments, quoting an article he wrote for the April, 1958 edition of The Diapason. He describes the "nearly 100" speakers, including 9 stereo pairs of Gyrophonic Projectors. Reference is made to similar large size Allens at Second Congregational Church in Waterbury, CT, and North Austin Lutheran Church in Chicago.

    Leave a comment:


  • beel m
    replied
    Originally posted by MarkS View Post
    The Stamford organ was claimed to have thirty generators. According to the above-mentioned salesperson, one set was dedicated to producing chiff.

    William H. Barnes wrote favorably of it in his book.
    30? Wow! I saw the organ in the mid-70s but by then the choir division, IIRC, had been changed to digital. The Fanwood Rodgers had 20 generators, and the Tenth Pres Allen had 26, so the Stamford organ *was* huge. I guess they heated the church with heat captured from all those tube filaments :-)

    - - - Updated - - -

    Originally posted by beel m View Post
    No, Dave, this particular Allen was self-contained like the S-12, including a gyro, but it had four 'general' stops- "unit diapason", "unit flute", "unit viola" and "unit dulciana" IIRC. The swell could key them at 4? pitches, the pedal at 3?, and the great at everything from 16' to 1'. There were some combination stops also.
    Thinking more about it, I believe it was a model B-10 or B-20. Nice organ for tube-organ days!

    R, Bill
    Mystery solved! It was a model C-2, mentioned in Jerome M's book, page 37. That's the one I played 50 years ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkS
    replied
    The Stamford organ was claimed to have thirty generators. According to the above-mentioned salesperson, one set was dedicated to producing chiff.

    William H. Barnes wrote favorably of it in his book.

    Leave a comment:


  • beel m
    replied
    Originally posted by tucsondave View Post
    The B & W series service manual simply say "other models" could have from 1 to 4 racks, no model numbers given.

    The C1 and C3 organs had self contained generators for flutes and diapasons. Other voices were synthesized using the crank and slide key contacts. Perhaps one of those is what you played.

    td
    No, Dave, this particular Allen was self-contained like the S-12, including a gyro, but it had four 'general' stops- "unit diapason", "unit flute", "unit viola" and "unit dulciana" IIRC. The swell could key them at 4? pitches, the pedal at 3?, and the great at everything from 16' to 1'. There were some combination stops also.
    Thinking more about it, I believe it was a model B-10 or B-20. Nice organ for tube-organ days!

    According to Bob Eby's book (1950), there was no real limit to how many racks Allen could use with a big tube organ... didn't the FPC Stamford biggie have 15 or 20?!

    R, Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • tucsondave
    replied
    The B & W series service manual simply say "other models" could have from 1 to 4 racks, no model numbers given.

    The C1 and C3 organs had self contained generators for flutes and diapasons. Other voices were synthesized using the crank and slide key contacts. Perhaps one of those is what you played.

    td

    Leave a comment:


  • beel m
    replied
    Originally posted by tucsondave View Post
    Actually two racks, swell and pedal on one rack, great on the other. 7 6SN7 tubes per oscillator chassis, 13 chassis'.
    60 watt amps used 4 6L6's, 70 and 90 watt amps used 2 6550's. A tube collectors dream!
    Funny how they don't mention the racks in the ad. :-)

    td
    That's what I get for trusting my memory. :-)
    Does anyone remember the self-contained tube Allen- I want to say B-2 but I'm prolly wrong about that too- which had four "Unit" stops (diap, flute etc) then the various couplers on each manual? I played one 50 years ago. Not too bad, especially since the only self-contained classical transistor organ, the T-12A, was only flutes. I wonder how many of them they sold...

    - - - Updated - - -

    Originally posted by tucsondave View Post
    Actually two racks, swell and pedal on one rack, great on the other. 7 6SN7 tubes per oscillator chassis, 13 chassis'.
    60 watt amps used 4 6L6's, 70 and 90 watt amps used 2 6550's. A tube collectors dream!
    Funny how they don't mention the racks in the ad. :-)

    td
    Dave, I remember Allen saying that they could add 'racks' almost without limit- one could give Great 4' stops, another could give Swell 4' stops, another for Choir 8' stops, another for celestes, yadda yadda. That's why I thought the Swell and Pedal were separate racks. SO- if you got the extra "Swell 4' stops" rack, would it include, say, Pedal 8' stops? Really curious here.
    R, Bill

    Leave a comment:

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