Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rodgers 990 Lacking In A Great Great

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rodgers 990 Lacking In A Great Great

    Greetings To The Organ World!

    Admittedly when the Rodgers 990 lived at church I only played it occasionally, because I primarily play at the large church location with the pipe organ. Aside from small electronic organs in the home setting I have no regular experience with electronic instruments. Now I have the Rodgers here at home in the music room and I am baffled by the stop collections / distribution.

    The pipe organs I am more familiar with playing all have a very nice sound selection of voices for their Great manual. It is usually equal to or better than that available on the Choir manual. Of course those Great voice pipes always sit out in the open with no volume regulation at all. That is specifically their purpose. So to regulate the volume you reduce or add stops for the Great manual.

    So yes having a Great / Choir Shoe is a new experience as well. I just can not understand why Rodgers thought folks purchasing the top of the line flagship instrument would want half of the quantity of stops on the Great compared to double the amount of offerings on the Swell, and Choir?
    Until The Next Dimension,
    Admiral Coluch.

    -1929 Wangerin Pipe Organ Historian
    -Owner 1982 Rogers Specification 990

  • #2
    Actually it is quite normal for the Swell to have more stops than the Great, since that is where you find the big Reed Chorus, plus Celestes, and often the components for the Cornet (2 2/3 & 1 3/5, etc.). Also, on many American Classic instruments, the Choir may be quite larger than the Great, to include the requirements for both an accompanimental style Choir and the Positiv.

    These instruments follow the example of Aeolian-Skinner in specification. If I am right, that model of Rodgers did not include even an 8' Reed in the Great, which was also the style of A-S under Donald G. Harrison.
    Mike

    My home organ is a Theatre III with an MDS II MIDI Expander.

    Comment


    • #3
      Agreed with m&m. The Walker at my church has 10 stops on Great (+2 from Swell), 15 on Choir, and 17 on Swell. (Not including Festival Trumpet which is accessible from the Swell and Great). The Choir and Swell stops are more varied. Although the Great does have a Trumpet 8’.
      Viscount C400 3-manual
      8 channels + 2 reverb channels (w/ Lexicon MX200)
      Klipsch RSX-3 speakers and Klipsch Ultra 5.1 subwoofers

      Comment


      • #4
        From that era, most all of the e-organ builders were stingy with reeds and color voices on the Great. Rodgers not the exception.

        Many pipe organs of small to moderate size follow the same approach--principal plenum on the great, with a flute secondary chorus, and maybe no reeds, or one borrowed from the Swell, or maybe just a single reed. Choir/Positiv with a strong selection of flutes, smaller scale principals, and a color reed or two. Swell having more color voices, and full reed chorus.

        Organs following a more European tradition (rather than American Classic a la Aeolian Skinner) will usually find a larger reed selection on the Great as well as some secondary color voices.

        Comment


        • #5
          I remember reading a critique of an organ one time where the writer figuratively rolled his eyes at the "great" division by saying it was hardly more than a keyboard to which all the other divisions could be coupled.

          Nowadays with digital technology it's not that hard for a builder to have a truly beefy great division that stands on its own. A "stop" is nothing more than a few megs of sample data in a ROM chip, and you can have as many as you want as long as you don't overload the tone generators, DACs, or audio system, or run out of stop rail space.

          But in the analog days, every stop added to a division represented at the very least a dedicated set of contacts or bank of 61 diodes, if not a full set of keyers and filters. So builders had to economize wherever possible. Since the great was going to have couplers to play all the other divisions from its keys, even at sub and super pitches, and even a 4' coupler of its own, its native stop set might be nothing more than a principal chorus (usually a unit) and a flute chorus (also a unit). The chimes might be on this manual as well, but that's about it.

          The assumption being that if you wanted more subtle or colorful stops you'd be playing on the choir or the swell, I suppose!
          John
          ----------
          *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

          https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

          Comment


          • #6
            Crazy. :) I guess I am just more familiar with pipe instruments of a European build style. I guess couplers will become my friends.
            Until The Next Dimension,
            Admiral Coluch.

            -1929 Wangerin Pipe Organ Historian
            -Owner 1982 Rogers Specification 990

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by m&m's View Post
              Actually it is quite normal for the Swell to have more stops than the Great, since that is where you find the big Reed Chorus, plus Celestes, and often the components for the Cornet (2 2/3 & 1 3/5, etc.).
              I wonder why Allen and others instead of including those mutations in the Swell stop list, they better include the Cornet stop and another 8´flue , which I thing is more important for the most frequent use of church organs.

              Comment


              • #8
                Where are the good 16' stops on these electronic instruments? Sure there are some in the foot-board, but why not a nice Diapason, or tuba on the Great?
                Until The Next Dimension,
                Admiral Coluch.

                -1929 Wangerin Pipe Organ Historian
                -Owner 1982 Rogers Specification 990

                Comment


                • #9
                  The Great on the 990 has a Gemshorn, which is keyed from the unit Diapason set to a soft level--I believe the level is adjustable, so you could set it to be a full-on Diapason.

                  Why no Tuba? See the early posts in this thread--Great reeds were not common when this organ was designed in US electronic organs. If organists had wanted this in a serious way Rodgers would have responded to market desires.

                  Of course, the Swell and Choir could couple to the Great at 16 ft.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X