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  • allen 301/124



    I am reposting this in the proper section of the forum--sorry I posted it in the wrong place before
    </p>I am choosing between an Allen system 301 or and Allen system 124. Which is better? Is there a website with pictures?


    </p>

  • #2
    Re: allen 301/124

    [quote user="organmaster100z"]


    I am reposting this in the proper section of the forum--sorry I posted it in the wrong place before
    </P>I am choosing between an Allen system 301 or and Allen system 124. Which is better? Is there a website with pictures?

    <P mce_keep="true"></P>


    [/quote]</P>


    The 301 has external speakers, 4 alterable voices, and a rank of analog oscillators to produce the celeste stops. The 124 has internal speakers and none of the features I mentioned for the 301.</P>

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: allen 301/124



      Doesn't the 301 also have a dual memory capture action, Whereas the 124 has something like a mere three factory presets? Also, I am pretty sure the 124 has no toe pistons or Crescendo.</p>

      Anyone want to verify this?</p>

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: allen 301/124



        I have played an Allen 225 (Mos2) for the last 23 years. The following general comments may be of help to you.</p>

        1. Check the condition of the speakers particularly the foam outer surround on the bass driver(s). This would have been due for replacement long ago - in fact may be due for a second replacement.</p>

        2. Be aware that these early Allens had a single expression pedal to control the whole instrument. They used 2 light dependent resistors one on the flute and one on the main channel. If these have not already died and been replaced they will certainly be close to failing. </p>

        3. If the instrument has a card reader the small exciter lamps may be at the end of their life. - it may be a good idea to replace these with leds - see Stan Harrison's site <font size="-1"><span class="a">www.hlabs.com/ The card reader also uses light dependent resistors - again probably approaching the end of their lives.</span></font> </p>

        4. Allens of this vintage tended to have a "dry" sound. O.K. in a live acoustical environment. but sterile in a dry environment. Several owners have reported a significant improvement in sound after fitting an external digital reverb unit --needs to be set with quite a low level of reverberation or it sounds artificial. Alesis nonoverbs have been successfully used. I have just had an Alto Alphaverb fitted to the organ I play. Stan Harrision manufactures a unit specifically for these organs. When fitting such units it is usually necessary to place an attenuator on the outputs or the signal overloads the expression controls. Again see Stan Harrison's site
        </p>

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        • #5
          Re: allen 301/124



          One of the posts asked about a capture action. The 301 does have a capture action--I don't know if it's double or not. Some of the 120 series of instruments have a capture action, while others do not. As I recall, the 120 had neither, only three or five presets. There was a model 121, and a model 122; one had the capture action and the other had the card reader. There was a model 123 (I think) that had both. I owned a model 120 for almost 20 years (sometimes it got as much as 20 hours of work per week), and I never had a lick of trouble with it.


          Good luck!</p>

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: allen 301/124



            You asked for pictures, and pictures you will get.</p>

            </p>

            This is a 301-C:

            [img]/photos/clavier/images/30271/original.aspx[/img]
            </p>


            This is a 123-C:

            </p>

            The main differences I have observed between the two include:</p>

            -The 301 also has a crescendo whereas the 123 only has a volume swell.
            -The 123 has a single memory capture action, but more two more general pistons than the 301
            -The 100 series has internal audio, the 301 has two or more external tone cabinets.
            -The 301 has six toe pistons for the pedal and an extra six toe pistons for the general presets, of course the 123 has no toe pistons
            -The 300 series has an analog celeste.</p>

            I don't know how close the 123 comes to the 124 so some of this info might not be exact, but you get the idea.</p>

            </p>


            </p>

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: allen 301/124



              Nice pictures, Joe. I'll add a little more info gleaned directly from the Allen MOS1 and MOS2 service literature:</P>


              The 123 in your photo was the fully tricked-out self-contained MOS-1 organ, quite well-equipped. However, the 124 is the lowest priced entry level model of the MOS-2 series. The MOS-2 organs were something of an incremental improvement over theMOS-1 models, incorporating frequency separation (flute channel tuned slightly sharp to the main channel),prettier chiff, card readers on all models, and perhaps a few other upgrades. These featureswere for the most part "options" on the MOS-1 organs but were built right into the computer board of MOS-2 organs and "free" instead of extra cost.The DAC boards used on MOS-2are cleaner and quieter, producing a slightlysmoother audio than MOS-1 organs.</P>


              The 124 being the entry level model, though, has only a 5-piston factory preset blind combination action. Not changeable by the user, and the tabs don't move into place. You just have to know what each piston brings on. It has internal amps and speakers. Some early versions had built-in jacks for adding external speakers, later ones you had to use screw terminals.</P>


              The 301 is part of the original MOS-1 series, and was the most complete model in the single-computer range having the 32' pedal stop, capture action, crescendo,card reader, most powerful amps and best speakers. An analog celeste generatorprovidedceleste stopson each manual, even though there is no secondary computer. This is a decent celeste, though it needs to be tuned periodically and can suffer from some of the same aging problems as the old analog generators on pre-digital Allens. There is an easy trick for tuning the analog celeste -- tune the computer (little stick-knob on the clock board) sharp by about 10 cents on middle C, turn on the chorus tab, then zero-beat the celeste notes with the digital notes. When done, turn off the chorus andreset the clock tuning to A440.</P>


              The 301, having no internal speakers but with amps in the console,would have been sold with a pair of HC-10 speakers, which were good units capable of reproducing the 32' pedal stop. The 15" drivers had a foam surround which will have rotted out years ago, and may already have been replaced. The 301 was actually a minor tweaking of the 300 model and included the improved random motion and speech articulation.</P>


              The capture action on the early production was the old sequentialclackity-clak type, although these are still reliable after close to 40 years. Later production would have used the Double Memory ("DM") capture, having two memories and a power supply able to move all the tabs at once, quite an improvement.</P>


              When the 301 was in production, there were several optional MOS board features such as frequency separation, digital delay (one channel speaks slightly behind the other),slow pedal for a more pipe-like pedal speech, "dash 3" voicing with cascaded choruses (a fancy way of saying the 8' and 4' member of each main chorus are in opposite channels for more realistic additive effect and slight frequency offset). So, any given 301 might have one or more of these options.</P>


              Either one would make a good practice organ or even a good starter organ in a small church. The 301 is considerably larger and more complete, but the 124 has the advantage of being possibly 8 or 10 years newer. </P>


              John</P>
              <P mce_keep="true"></P>
              John
              ----------
              *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

              https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

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