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practicing with memory pistons?

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  • practicing with memory pistons?



    How important do you think memory pistons are when practicing the organ at home? I saw a good deal on a really good digital organ, but I could not set my own memory pistons..they just came preset. </p>

    Is it still worth it? I am an organ student...so I am not playing anything "big."
    </p>

  • #2
    Re: practicing with memory pistons?



    A digital organs with preset pistons? Hmmm... That's strange. Most of the digital organs have a capture system. Perhaps you have to press and hold the piston to set the stops?</p>

    Honestly, it depends on what you're planning on doing with the organ. No, it's not absolutely necessary on a practice organ for your living room, but they really do come in handy. My Allen at home has 3 preset pistons (it's an analog organ), and I find that I often do use them. They are really nice when I'm practicing hymns.</p>

    In my opinion, you should be just fine. If you can find an organ with settable pistons, it's worth spending a little extra dough for, but you'll be just fine with out them.</p>

    What kind of organ is it?</p>

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    • #3
      Re: practicing with memory pistons?



      I would tend to think that even a smaller digital organ with just a few general pistons would have some way to set the memory, even if the stops do not move (which is usually the case in these instances). I seem to recall some of the bottom-of-the-line analog (but still AGO) consoles from the 1970's had three or four non-moving general pistons that were factory set and unchangeable (at least not conveniently).</P>


      What make and age is this organ?</P>


      By the way, I find a traditional moving combination action helpful when I am at home practicing what I will be doing at church. But this is an expensive luxury for a small practice organ.</P>


      Good luck!</P>


      [Y]</P>

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      • #4
        Re: practicing with memory pistons?

        The Organ is an Allen from 1981. It has preset piston but they are set by the Allen company, and there is no way to change them.

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        • #5
          Re: practicing with memory pistons?



          Okay, that settles that. You might want to verify that this organ has a standard AGO pedalboard rather than the Princess pedalboard.</P>


          [*-)]</P>

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          • #6
            Re: practicing with memory pistons?

            I was unaware that Allen made digital organs without changeable presets. John, is this true?

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            • #7
              Re: practicing with memory pistons?



              Buzzy, unless Allen has a secret way of setting pistons that I'm unaware of, it is true indeed...</p>

              [^o)]</p>

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              • #8
                Re: practicing with memory pistons?



                no, no no.. I meant DIGITAL organs. I know that the TC-1 and TC-3 can't be changed.. or can they?</p>

                </p>

                How many Psychiatrists does it take to change an Allen organ's presets? </p>

                </p>

                1, but the organ has to want to change.</p>

                </p>

                </p>

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                • #9
                  Re: practicing with memory pistons?



                  The Allen TC-1 Series Service Manual tells on page 24 how to subtract or add stops to a pre-set combination. It says:</P>


                  "The Pre-Set system used on TC-1 series organs is called a blind piston system since the stops are not physically moved up and down by the system. The pistons are pre-set at the factory. The combinations may, however, be changed by a technician. By comparing the contact numbers on the pre-set drawing [on the facing page 25] with the tone strip numbers on the stop board drawings for the various models, a determination can be made as to which stops are included on each piston."</P>


                  The instructions then follow for bending contacts away or adding jumper wires to accomplish the desired changes. Purchasing the TC-1 Service Manual package ($50 plus $5 shipping) is a worthwhile investment.</P>


                  Carl D.</P>

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