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When did Allen switch designs?

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  • When did Allen switch designs?



    Hey all,</p>

    </p>

    Just another silly question for you organ tech type. When did Allen switch from this bad 1970's 'futurama' design console to the regular cute little one found in the other picture? </p>

    Wait, how do we put in pictures?</p>

    </p>

    </p>

  • #2
    Re: When did Allen switch designs?



    No, seriously, how do we post pictures on here in our postings??</p>

    </p>

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: When did Allen switch designs?



      Buzzy,</P>


      I was an Allen salesman back in the 80's and I think I know the design you speak of, even without a photo. You mean that ugly spaceship-looking console that Allen introduced in 1971 for the 100 and 200 series MOS-1 organs, right? There is a black stripe just below keybed level that makes it almost look like the top portion of the console is floating above the bottom part. When you open the top, you remove a screw on each side and tilt back the whole upper portion, including the sidearms.</P>


      That style console was subsequently used for the low-end MOS-2 organs too. Then the really cheap MDC models (not to be confused with the later MDS organs, an entirely different series). I believe the last organs to use that console would have been the MDC 42 and 52, which were discontinued in 1982 as the all-new ADC/MADC organs were introduced.</P>


      I don't think there were any ADC/MADC organs with that console. Someone may prove me wrong, though.</P>


      John</P>
      <P mce_keep="true"></P>
      John
      ----------
      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: When did Allen switch designs?

        That's what I thought until I saw this bad boy on ebay

        http://cgi.ebay.com/ALLEN-DIGITAL-CO...QQcmdZViewItem

        Now, how do you post pics???!!! Anyone? I know I've seen that before, but I can't find it in the search function.

        buzzzzz

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: When did Allen switch designs?

          [quote user="jbird604"]

          Buzzy,</p>


          I was an Allen salesman back in the 80's and I think I know the design you speak of, even without a photo. You mean that ugly spaceship-looking console that Allen introduced in 1971 for the 100 and 200 series MOS-1 organs, right? There is a black stripe just below keybed level that makes it almost look like the top portion of the console is floating above the bottom part. When you open the top, you remove a screw on each side and tilt back the whole upper portion, including the sidearms.</p>


          That style console was subsequently used for the low-end MOS-2 organs too. Then the really cheap MDC models (not to be confused with the later MDS organs, an entirely different series). I believe the last organs to use that console would have been the MDC 42 and 52, which were discontinued in 1982 as the all-new ADC/MADC organs were introduced.</p>


          I don't think there were any ADC/MADC organs with that console. Someone may prove me wrong, though.</p>


          John</p>
          <p mce_keep="true"></p>

          [/quote]</p>

          </p>

          Ugly??? It isn't either!</p>

          </p>

          I believe the ADC 400 series is in a case similar to that.</p>

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: When did Allen switch designs?



            Apologies to Clavier and anyone else.It was unkind of me to call that console "ugly." The one for sale on ebay is actually quite smart-looking in that nice oak finish. And though the AC was not my favorite Allen design, it does have a charm of its own.</P>


            Buzzzzzy, I must be wrong about the last ones coming out in 1982. That organhas all the hallmarks of the ADC/MADC era, such as "celeste tuning" and "B Memory." Having no alterables (card reader) would mark it as part of the MADC 1 series. And being self-contained AGO makes it a model (M)ADC420.</P>


            Perhaps Allen continued to use that console until they introduced the revised MADC models about 1986. These new models incuded the MADC 3100 with drawknobs and the 2100 and 1100 with tabs. They were built in a newly designed small console called the "T" console. So, beginning about 1986 Allen used the "S" (AKA "Princess") console for the smallest organ, the "T" console for the AGO MADC models, and the larger style "D" and up consoles above that.</P>


            Hope that is correct.</P>


            BTW, that little organ for sale on ebay might be worth a look, as you need something rather compact during your student years. I remember thinking back then that I could be happy with one at home. The sound is not really pretty up close due to the graininess of the era, but the stop list is quite good. The audio system runs on standard line-level signals throughout, so one could very easily add a good reverb unit without having to modifiy the expression system.The one drawback is the blind capture system. Although you can set up each piston, even twice with the "B" memory, when you press a piston the tabs don't move, but an LED indicator show which piston is active. You have to be sure to hit Cancel before you set up each piston, because otherwise you'll be hearing the active preset along with whatever stops you have down, but the system will not memorize the previous preset, only the current stops down. I used to get confused all the time just demonstrating this to customers.</P>


            Butthe price appears to be right, though the shipping will get you.</P>


            John</P>
            <P mce_keep="true"></P>
            John
            ----------
            *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

            https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: When did Allen switch designs?



              Obviously MOST MADC organs didn't have the spaceship console, because we've all seen a ton of them that didn't. (Love that sobriquet - indeed it does like like the design for a control panel from a Tom Baker era episode of Doctor Who, if it were in white plastic) I propose that this console was probably available as an option to 1980s churches that wanted a more contemporary, spaceship-y look.
              </p>

              I have an (M)ADC-1140.and I've always wondered, were the exterior dimensions for T series consoles ALL the same? Cause looking at my keyboard pocket spaces I can't believe they fit drawknobs in there for the 3100/3160. Yet that is exactly what Allen engineer Walter G. said they did over on the yahoo board a few years ago.</p>

              </p>

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: When did Allen switch designs?



                circ,</P>


                It's true that the MADC-1140 is in the same "T" console as the 3100 series with drawknobs. Same dimensions externally. The drawknob towers just aren't very big, as there aren't that many stops. They even used a zig-zag separator between the pedal stops and swell stops to cram in more knobs in the space available. What I mean is, the row of knobs in the middle has some swell knobs and some pedal knobs, separated by a diagonal gold-colored line. Used to confuse me all the time. I'd pull a knob thinking it was a pedal stop when it was on the swell, or vice versa.</P>


                I like those 1100 - 2100 - 3100 organs when I was selling them. Seemed like a lot of organ for the money. Your 1140 actually has 6 audio channels internally, though they get mixed down to just 2 to accomodate the internal speakers. But the expression takes place inside the cage (IIRC), so you could actually run the 6 cage outputs into 6 amps and have a pretty good sized organ. ( two channels for the great/pedal, two for the swell, and two for the floating alterable division.)</P>


                John</P>
                John
                ----------
                *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: When did Allen switch designs?



                  Indeed that is what I've done, more or less. I've discussed it elsewhere, if you are incredibly bored (you'd have be in solitary confinement somewhere haha) you are welcome to click on my profile and read all about it.</p>

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